Best way to get internet in detached garge???

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-15-14, 11:37 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Best way to get internet in detached garge???

Hello everybody!!!
I am turning my detached garage into a store and I am trying to figure out a way to get my internet service in there.
My modem and router (Belkin AC 1800) are located in a second floor bedroom on the opposite side of the house from the garage (this is where the previous owners had it installed).
The garage itself has no cable lines, phone lines or ethernet ports and has its own fuse box but runs on the same meter as the house.
The garage is less than 100 feet away from the house (150-200 ft from router).
The garage is also concrete slabbed with block base.
I want to install a POS system in the garage and need to have the best internet possible.
I get a weak signal (about 1 bar) when using my Galaxy Note.
What are my options and best way to proceed???
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-16-14, 12:58 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: United States
Posts: 2,446
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If it were me I would probably run category 5 wire from the house to the garage but not just any category 5 as at some point the wire will need to be buried so it needs to be rated for burial and then you need to mark where the wire is to prevent it from being dig up in the future. That would be the ideal way as it would offer more security than wifi would and would be option one. Option two would be to mount an antenna on the roof that would be connected to your router so you could boost the signal some but it has its bad sides lightning strikes and the possibility that someone could listen in.

There are various antennas on this page from Amazon.com with their good and bad points here is the link Amazon.com: outdoor wifi antenna . I really can't say which is better and have only looked into them once or twice. Those are your options though with them being the basic options that you could add onto such as adding another router or using a router switch between the router and your garage. Welcome to the forum!
 
  #3  
Old 11-16-14, 03:15 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
Why not move the router to the other end of the house closer to the garage?
 
  #4  
Old 11-16-14, 04:44 AM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,113
Received 30 Votes on 28 Posts
Considering moving the router might require relocating some cabling, running cat5 to the garage might be a bit more work but would be a more reliable connection.
The other thing to consider is relocating the router as suggested and replacing it with a better one that would be more powerful and has external antennas.
 
  #5  
Old 11-16-14, 06:40 AM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 8,420
Received 169 Votes on 154 Posts
the easiest route is get a repeater to boost the wifi signal
 
  #6  
Old 11-16-14, 08:10 AM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the suggestions so far! And thanks for welcoming me to your community!!!
As it is in the 20/30s here in PA, digging a line really isn't an option at the moment. But it might be something I could look into next spring
An associate at Best Buy also said to try an extender, but there were some issues when using one.
A friend of mine also suggested to ask the cable guy if they could run a line into the garage for the internet???
I guess there are a couple of way I could do it, but I want to make sure what I do is going to be a solid connection...
 
  #7  
Old 11-16-14, 05:34 PM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 5,050
Received 78 Votes on 73 Posts
I haven't had many good experience with extenders. I spent some time trying a Linksys extender and determined it's not even worth it as a paperweight. I've had more luck with Apple routers, but they still aren't 100% reliable.

I would first try moving the router/access point as Chandler stated. That's definitely the easiest, even if you need a second access point in that location. No wires, no worries about digging, grounding, etc.

The second option I would try is a hard-wire connection... maybe above ground for the winter, but eventually buried. I don't typically like the idea since underground wires tend to act as antennas for lightning in the area. I wouldn't really like connecting my expensive equipment to it if I can help it.
 
  #8  
Old 11-16-14, 08:44 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
In regards to moving the router...I took a look at what all I would have to do and here is what I see:
1. there are multiple lines in the back of the router:
a. one coming from the modem
b. one going to the computer
c. one coming from a Direct TV device
d. and lastly the power adapter
2. I do not know if I can move the Direct TV device
3. I would have to run cable through the room and down the stairs (50 or so ft)
4. I would have to run 2 Cat5 cables back up the stairs and through the room to connect to pc and modem
This seems to be a lot of work just to move the router...any suggestions???
 
  #9  
Old 11-16-14, 11:13 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: United States
Posts: 2,446
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Here is another idea that works fairly well for most people. Instead of moving your present router get another router with a good deal of range and use that for your wifi instead of a repeater or extender as Zorfdt is right from my research they don't work all that well. GregH makes a good point too in saying you should use another router connected to your old router. Basically you would turn your old router into a hub and you would turn the wifi off on the old router. Take a look at GregH's link and look at the back of the router.

Do you see where that router says Internet? You would connect cat5 wire onto the part that says Ethernet from your old router and on your new router connect the Ethernet wire to the Internet connection. Since you say you have a great deal of things plugged into your old router you will need an Ethernet switch next to your old router here is a good one here for you to look at that isn't the cheapest but isn't real expensive either http://www.amazon.com/TP-LINK-TL-SG1...thernet+switch . That will give you more hub space than what you have now.
 
  #10  
Old 11-17-14, 04:31 AM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,113
Received 30 Votes on 28 Posts
First place I would start that only involves a few dollars is to replace your current wi-fi router with something like this.


The antennae are removable and you may you mat be able to get aftermarket directional antennae that might increase range even more.
 
  #11  
Old 11-23-14, 04:33 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Other Possibilities

Hello,

Firstly I wouldn't recommend a repeater. Or at least make sure you get a dual antenna one.

By default most repeaters are a single antenna, that it both "repeats" on and talks back to the source. This can cause a huge degradation in your wifi.

Since you are looking for a very stable connection (since you are selling things)... that is even more of a problem.

I would recommend at a minimum an access point. In this particular case you have a couple of options but again it depends on what you really are willing to do..

1) Run a cable to your primary router from downstairs and then use a secondary Access Point (not just a router, although may routers can be an Access Point if it supports Bridging).

You would then make the access point WiFi the same Name and Password (or security Key) that your primary router has (or wifi device).

In this way the signal will be as strong as possible at its starting point, as it's not a repeater, it's an Access Point, so the signal at ITS point is as strong as you are going to get

I would really recommend 5G if you are going to do this... but I realize you said you needed to keep costs low

2) You could buy and run and outside cable.. I have NO idea if you have the ability to run it so it's not just completely sitting on the ground BUT external cable does NOT need to be buried.. While it's better to do so, you could literally run a cable from your second story, through the air.. to your garage in a window and down to your machine..

3) If you CANNOT run a cable.. to your upstairs router then you have another option.. You can buy a powerline device. It allows you to plug in (upto a 500mbps) adapter to your wall plug. You plug one downstairs, one near your router upstairs (do not plug into a surge protector). Each of these will have a Cat5x plug on it.

Add a new 2.4 / 5 dual signal wireless router(as an access point) You would plug THIS in bridging mode and plug it into the adapter in the wall.. then the one in the wall to your router upstairs (you need to make room for it)

Now hope that nothing really interferes with your signal

4) IF you are lucky enough that the garage power and the house are on the SAME panel and have a cross-over etc (meaning they share power lines connectedly), then you could merely put a 500mgbs power adapter in your garage, and then one in your house (upstairs), and plug them into their respective sides it could work.

I've used them and they work really well and you can get up to (supposedly) 300feet - 350feet on them so your 150-200 shouldn't be a problem.

You should still get at least 10mgbs and that would be fine for your POS system.

5) Make your Phone a hot spot, or get a hot spot from your Wireless Phone Company... chances are, if you are good... while I truly hope you sell so much you are rich rich rich :-), you probably could get away with 1gig a month of data

Anyhoo, hope that helps

Cheers,
 

Last edited by DIYSammamish; 11-23-14 at 04:33 PM. Reason: clarification
  #12  
Old 11-24-14, 06:33 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the suggestions...I am throwing around the idea of having the cable company run a line to the garage...
Since the garage does have its own fuse box, I do not think the powerline will work...but it might be a viable option for adding an extra router closer to the garage...
Should be getting the POS system delivered tomorrow so I will see what kind of signal I currently carry and go from there...
Thanks again to everyone that has helped!!!
 
  #13  
Old 11-26-14, 04:39 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,542
Received 69 Votes on 60 Posts
Two ideas

First - have you considered data via your cellphone?
I'm getting up to 10 megs download through newer 4gLTE smartphone.
I've canceled my cable internet at my office and run that data through via my phone.

Second - My home situation is quite similar,
I have internet (and LAN access to printers etc) to an office in the garage using a spare router in the house as a broadcast point with a second router in the garage as a repeater-gateway.
edit- If you just need internet access, that is simpler. If you also need LAN access to home file servers / network printers, that can be a bit more complex to setup.

Discontinuing cable internet at the office gave me a spare Westell 327w router.
Hard reset the router, set it to same SSID and password but different channel from the main house router.
Purchase 100' of Cat5e online, plug into main router, the spare router is now an access point.
Put the spare router in a window facing the garage. Works ok, get 1-5 megs speed in garage.

Upgraded it- added a repeater-bridge located in the garage.
Checked the local thrift shop for a router that would run an open source router firmware called DD-WRT, which lets you create a wifi bridge.
Found a Linksys WRT54G router for $20 bucks a few years ago.

Setup is
1- main router on Wifi channel 1 in house at desk, SSID is "House"
2- 100' cat 5e cable
3- Westell 327 router sitting in 2nd floor window facing garage. Router is setup as access point, it uses wifi channel 6, SSID is "Bridge".
4- 100' of air between house and garage with routers facing each other.
5- Linksys WRT5t4G router running dd-wrt is sitting in 2nd floor window of garage facing house. Router is set to be repeater-bridge. Router listens to hidden SSID "Bridge" and rebroadcasts as SSID "House" on wifi Channel 12.

Result - any wifi device only needs to be set to "House" with password to work in both house and garage, by keeping same SSID but shifting wifi channels, the connection works seamlessly.

Results in the garage on speedtest vary by device,
android cell phones are 5-10 megs iphone and kindle fire run 15-20 megs,
not bad as the basic service is fios 30 megs.

Hal
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 11-26-14 at 05:15 AM.
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: