wifi challenge

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Old 12-22-15, 09:49 PM
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wifi challenge

I got one of those tablets for a gift. It needs wifi but I don't have wifi in the house; I'd need to get a router. But I already have an older desktop PC and a laptop in the house which I use just plugged into the modem. The desktop has no wifi capability but the laptop does. I'm fine with wired connection, I'm used to just plugging the ethernet wire from the modem back and forth to either the desktop PC or the laptop depending on which I want to use; and just never bothered with getting a router set up and having wifi for the laptop in the house. If I get a router so I can have wifi for the tablet then can I plug either the desktop or the laptop into the router and be connected with either of those (wired) and also be connected (at the same time) to the wireless connection I'll need to set up for my tablet? Or would there be conflicts with one or the other computer/tablet not being able to connect unless I do something special?
 
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Old 12-22-15, 09:56 PM
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You can get a wireless router. You'd get one with four LAN jacks on it for hardwired connections. You could use your two wired computers and the tablet all at the same time.

You can also use the laptop wirelessly at the same time.
 
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Old 12-22-15, 10:15 PM
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Ok a wireless router was actually what I was meaning when I just said router. So it should be just that simple? After I set up my wireless connection with my wireless router I can just plug my wired computer(s) into a LAN jack on the wireless router and can be connected with the (wireless) tablet as well as connected with the wired computer? No conflicts, one or the other not connecting because the other is in use? No special "configuring" I need to do?
 
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Old 12-22-15, 10:20 PM
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Another option is to give your desktop wifi with a tiny USB dongle that you just leave plugged in & never have to worry about:

Amazon.com: Edimax EW-7811Un 150Mbps 11n Wi-Fi USB Adapter, Nano Size Lets You Plug it and Forget it, Ideal for Raspberry Pi, Supports Windows, Mac OS, Linux: Computers & Accessories

Then, your desktop, laptop, and tablet will all be wireless & you don't have to worry about plugging stuff in.

With a wireless router with 4-port switch, it's a good bet that it'll come pre-configured for "automatic conflict resolution" (aka, dhcp). You're gonna have to go in the settings regardless to setup wifi security - make sure you choose WPA2. Don't just plug & play...
 
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Old 12-22-15, 10:23 PM
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No special configuring at all.

You'll plug the wireless router into power.
Connect it to your modem.
Fire it up.
You can just plug in the desktop computer.
The router will come with a WiFi password which you can use or choose your own.
Set the security to WPA2.
Go to set up WiFi in your pad. You should see your new router listed. Click on it and enter the password when prompted.
For the most part.... that's it.
 
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Old 12-22-15, 10:48 PM
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The only conflict I can see is if you are on a shared connection and if so you can still use your own router with its own wifi signal but your router has to be set differently from the host router. So basically you just connect your own router directly into your computer log into it and then turn DHCP off on that router as otherwise it will conflict with the main router. I have two routers going at once because I have an old PDA that can only use WEP and at the time I wanted to be able to use that old device. I have only done this once so my explanation might be off.

I suggest you wait until more people have posted who have greater experience than I in networking. I am positive about one thing though if you are sharing a router the cord from the main router to yours needs to go into your Ethernet port on your router not the WAN port for it to work right.
 
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Old 12-22-15, 10:54 PM
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Okay this is good. Shouldn't be a complicated ordeal then. Thanks.

wireless router. You'd get one with four LAN jacks on it for hardwired connections.
I wouldn't necessarily need four LAN jacks, just one or two. Unless that's just how they typically come, with four.

Another option is to give your desktop wifi with a tiny USB dongle that you just leave plugged in & never have to worry about
Yeah, get off the wired completely, I could. Even though I have no problem with the wired. Never worry about it.
 
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Old 12-22-15, 11:01 PM
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The only conflict I can see is if you are on a shared connection
Not sure what is meant by a shared connection but I just plan on wanting to connect as I described, and with one router.
 
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Old 12-23-15, 12:28 AM
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You can have any machine connected either way, wired or wireless. One home router can provide about 254 IP addresses. Wired is more secure than wireless. Connecting anything directly to a modem is not secure. Follow what was already said about wpa2 encryption. What is the make & model of your modem?
 
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Old 12-23-15, 05:10 AM
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I have a wireless router with a PC plugged into it via the Ethernet cable. Many/all wireless routers have Ethernet ports and it's almost required that you plug it into a computer with a cable for setup. But, any computer plugged into the router with a cable can have access. Since they are hard wired the security stuff is not needed unless you choose to turn that feature on.

I would suggest researching wireless routers a bit. At first I thought I only needed OK range just to cover inside my home. I soon found how handy it was to have access on the back patio or when working in the shop or on a car in the driveway.
 
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Old 12-23-15, 08:32 AM
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Wired is more secure than wireless
Yeah but despite that I was still wanting to maybe connect my new "tablet" at home (wirelessly because that's the only way it connects).

Connecting anything directly to a modem is not secure.
Well I connect my wired PCs directly to a modem, currently anyway... So that's no good then? Not secure?

Follow what was already said about wpa2 encryption
Definitely planned on that, with the wireless router when/if I get one.

What is the make & model of your modem?
RCA DCM425. Provided by my ISP (cable company). Is that gonna be ok?
 
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Old 12-23-15, 08:42 AM
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I would suggest researching wireless routers a bit. At first I thought I only needed OK range just to cover inside my home. I soon found how handy it was to have access on the back patio or when working in the shop or on a car in the driveway.
Yes, it'd be good to have one that has decent range so I could have access at such places at my home. I'll definitely keep that in mind. I figure a range of a good 50 feet should be sufficient for my situation.
 
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Old 12-23-15, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by sgull
Originally Posted by Pulpo
Connecting anything directly to a modem is not secure.
Well I connect my wired PCs directly to a modem, currently anyway... So that's no good then? Not secure?
In a general sense for most of the population...yeah I would agree. Basically when you plug your computer/laptop directly into a modem, your modem simply passes ALL internet traffic to your computer.

If a router instead of your computer is connected to the modem, now the router receives ALL traffic coming from that modem. Your computer then connects to that router, and there is now a boundary between your computer and the internet. The router will only forward stuff to your computer if necessary & depending on security settings. If you have a combo modem/router/gateway, you're protected in the sense that there is a boundary between your computer & the internet.

Not to cause any alarm, but there's always random people scanning random computers on the internet ALL the time. And most are in an automated way (ever hear of the term "botnet"). These random people/machines are always trying to see if you have programs such as remote desktop, windows file sharing, etc. so that they can hack into your computer.

But the reason I say "general sense" is because if you were so inclined, you could lock down your computer to act just like a router. Most internet security/anti-virus programs like McAfee, Symantec, etc.. will include some type of firewall that will filter traffic coming in/out of your computer. Honestly with the amount of "stuff" these computers force us into nowadays, it gets harder to secure them (in favor of convenience...but that's another topic).

But I agree that for the general population, throw a router between your computer & your modem for a bump up in security. Just don't go enabling DMZ...
 
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Old 12-23-15, 10:47 AM
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I agree that for the general population, throw a router between your computer & your modem for a bump up in security
Ok will do, and thanks for the explanation jpritzen.
 
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Old 12-23-15, 01:13 PM
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Well I connect my wired PCs directly to a modem, currently anyway... So that's no good then? Not secure?
It's not secure if file sharing is enabled because the shares can be seen by anyone, if they happen to look. In the days of dialup, I couldn't count the hard drives that were available, to view.


RCA DCM425. Provided by my ISP (cable company). Is that gonna be ok?
The modem is fine. Just secure the network.

Not to cause any alarm, but there's always random people scanning random computers on the internet ALL the time.
That's right except they are scanning IP subnets not computers. When they find a computer like yours, they will look at whatever is readable. I used to leave little files on their desktops entitled open_me. If they opened it, they would see advice on how to password protect their computer. There have been times when someone left a note before me. Then I added to it. I would say, I'm the second guy here & he's right. Secure your PC.
 
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Old 12-23-15, 02:26 PM
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I would say, I'm the second guy here & he's right. Secure your PC.
...except that the 10 people before the both of you decided to just steal the poor guy's files without leaving a note! Or better yet, place a virus or malware on the share, and create a shortcut to the malware on the desktop giving it Internet Explorer's icon & naming the shortcut Internet Explorer. Or fast-forward to today's day & age where they'll do that whole encryption ransomware routine.

Not to go off on a tanget sgull, but once you get that router, change the default password, ensure WPA2 is used for wifi security, and that remote management is disabled (no need to manage that router from the internet based on what your usage needs indicate). And if you want to really be proactive, keep the firmware of the router up-to-date by checking the manufacturer's website every now & then for any updates. Lots of routers get hacked because of bugs in the routers themselves.

Same goes for your PC. If you keep Windows, Adobe Flash, Microsoft Office, and Java up to date, you protect yourself from most malware out there being able to take advantage of your PC.
 
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Old 12-25-15, 03:35 AM
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...except that the 10 people before the both of you decided to just steal the poor guy's files without leaving a note!
That certainly could have happened.
 
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