What is combined 10-Gigabit SFP+ ports are and use for?

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Old 11-10-16, 08:12 AM
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What is combined 10-Gigabit SFP+ ports are and use for?

I found the NETGEAR ProSAFE 16-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet Smart Managed Switch (XS716T-100NES) for $1,323.83 with two combined 10-Gigabit SFP+ ports and NETGEAR ProSAFE 16-Port 10-Gigabit Copper Web Managed Switch with 1 Copper/SFP+ Combo Port (XS716E-100NES) for $1,350.74 but has only one combine 10-Gigabit SFP+ ports. The one with one less combined 10-Gigabit SFP+ ports is a bit less expensive. So, what exactly is the combined 10-Gigabit SFP+ ports are and what are its advantages/disadvantages?

I'm thinking about wiring my whole house and I'm looking for a 10-Gigabits switch.

Thank you.
 
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Old 11-10-16, 10:03 AM
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SFP is an acronym for a plug with "built-in electronics" turning it into a complete network transceiver. They used to connect a switch (or other devices) to a network. Not familiar with the + but I'd bet it indicates higher speed.
 
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Old 11-10-16, 10:26 AM
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Just curious but what do you need 10Gb speed for in your home? That may be current high end networking speeds but what are you doing on your home network that would require that speed and bandwidth? I don't mean to pry but most home activity can be managed just fine with 1Gb ethernet or really even 100Mb ethernet. You probably know most of this stuff already if you are looking at high end network switches but most of us are limited by our internet connection and then any congestion on our home networks. By upgrading to a managed switch from your basic network hub, you eliminate the congestion. Seems like you might have alot of options in the under $500 market without focusing on 10Gb speeds. Even 16 ports is a lot considering how much wireless networking there is on our devices.

Not trying to be rude, just curious where this hardware fits into a home network.

- Peter
 
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Old 11-10-16, 10:34 AM
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Thank you all for the response. I'm working with 2GB-5GB of layered Photoshop images , editing and playing HD to 4K videos. It may still be lagging for HD/4K video editing but at least it's not as bad.
 
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Old 11-10-16, 02:31 PM
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Not trying to be rude, just curious where this hardware fits into a home network.
That would be my question too. Why spend all that money if you can't enjoy the benefits?
 
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Old 11-13-16, 06:03 AM
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The slots are typically used to connect switches together via fiber. The GBIC, or GigaBit Interface Card, is used to populate the slots. The shared RJ connector is a standard port, but only one of the shared ports can be used at a time.
 
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Old 11-15-16, 09:18 AM
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Ah, I see. Thank you, Rick Johnston.
 
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