How to Open ISO

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  #1  
Old 03-28-19, 07:31 AM
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How to Open ISO

I downloaded 4 Linux OSís and made the ISO DVD for each one and now I can run each DVD to see how each one works..

Since my laptop does not have a DVD (I have an external DVD) I copied the ISOís into my HD but how can I run each ISO to see the differences?

I know how to install the ISO into my HD, if I want to, but for now I just want to be able to test each system.
 
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Old 03-28-19, 08:07 AM
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I would think you'd need the OS's on a flash drive and then boot from the flash drive.
 
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Old 03-28-19, 08:43 AM
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kolias Ė

As PJmax indicated those files are meant to be placed on a bootable device. You need to burn the .iso image onto a blank DVD and then boot from that DVD to start Linux.

Whatever software and process you are using to burn DVDís, use that same process and burn one of the .iso files of your choice to a blank DVD.

To boot from that DVD you might have to go into the BIOS and change settings to make sure that the system boots from the USB device (your external DVD drive would be USB) rather than the hard drive. There should be something in the BIOS that lists the preferred boot order or says something like ďBoot from USB firstĒ or something like that.
 
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Old 03-28-19, 09:57 AM
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Perhaps my post was not clear enough but I did mention that I got the ISO into a DVD and I can open the program from the DVD

My question basically is can I open the ISO from my Laptop?
 
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Old 03-28-19, 10:13 AM
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Yes. You just need to make sure the laptop BIOS is set to allow you to boot from the DVD rather than the hard drive.
 
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Old 03-28-19, 10:31 AM
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My laptop does not have a dvd, I have to plug an external dvd to use a dvd and the purpose of this thread is to find out if it is possible to click a Linux iso which I have copied into my laptops HD and open it. Thinking about it I don’t think it’s possible but I have to ask
 
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Old 03-28-19, 11:12 AM
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I don't think it's possible until it's actually installed. I was able to do something similar and load the ISO program on a flash drive and then booted from the flash drive.
 
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Old 03-28-19, 11:14 AM
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Yes a flash drive is a good alternative
 
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Old 03-28-19, 11:28 AM
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Why donít you want to connect your external drive to the laptop, with your Linux DVD inserted, and boot up from the external drive? I thought you wanted to test Linux on your laptop.
 
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Old 03-28-19, 11:56 AM
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It is not convenient to plug the external DVD player into my laptop where with a flash drive there is no problem. Testing Linux is an ongoing process for me before I decide if I should install it as a dual boot
 
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Old 03-28-19, 11:57 AM
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If you still have the ISO file then download Rufus.iso

It'll burn the image onto a USB drive and it will be bootable. No need for any DVD.
 
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Old 03-28-19, 12:12 PM
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It is not convenient to plug the external DVD player into my laptop where with a flash drive there is no problem.
A flash drive would be good, but I would at least boot up on your laptop from your ISO DVD in the external drive at least one time, to make sure that the ISO file is good and you don't have any problems booting up from USB on your laptop.

Otherwise buying a flash device and writing the ISO to it will be a waste of time and money - IMHO.
 
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Old 03-28-19, 12:48 PM
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.iso files can be run without a drive - right click on the file and you should have an option to mount it as a drive. Then the virtual DVD drive will show up in Computer so you can run it as if it were a physical DVD.
 
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Old 03-28-19, 06:00 PM
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stickshift you are right but then I canít find any file (executable) to run the program

Searching around I think the best solution to my problem is a virtual machine. I have the VMware Player installed on my laptop and the 4 Linux ISOís installed but VMware takes only 70% of my 15Ē laptop screen and then the Linux is even smaller and hard to see the small fonts. Good if you know what you are doing but not good enough to learn a new OS.

So I decided the install the VMware Player on my desktop which has a 20Ē screen and Iím in the process to install now the 4 ISOís. Hopefully all will be fine
 
  #15  
Old 03-29-19, 08:24 AM
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I think the drive emulator will allow you to mount the drive (the .iso file) and access it just like on a real optical drive, and will in fact allow you to access the contents with Windows Explorer just like any other optical drive, but what you really need is to be able to boot up from that .iso image. I donít see how that could work with emulation that seems to be at a higher level.

But, on the other hand, it looks like you can in fact boot from an .iso file in a virtual machine and that can work. You can try it, but if you have any problems you have now introduced another level of complexity by using virtualization. So if something doesnít work you wonít know for sure if itís a Linux problem with your hardware, or a Linux problem going through the virtualization interface.

If it were me, just to start with, Iíd keep it simple and boot up with the actual DVD on bare hardware. But it canít hurt to try the virtual method first.

Just my opinion.
 
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Old 03-29-19, 11:35 AM
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The drive emulator has the option to run the ISO from the ISO file or install it into a virtual hard disk. I choose to install into the virtual HD and now I can switch between the 4 Linux OS’s to see the differences between them.

I don’t want right now to install the ISO into my Windows (dual boot) in case I decide not to use Linux. I did it before and messed up my windows boot files and I was lucky I had a recent back up and after a restore (including modifying the boot files) my Windows went back to its original state
 
  #17  
Old 03-29-19, 12:46 PM
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The drive emulator
Donít you mean VMware?
messed up my windows boot files
Happened to me too. Thatís something the Linux world should correct. No way to back the installation out. I donít remember what I did to correct the problem. I donít even remember the exact problem, but I think I found a procedure somewhere online to restore the boot process files. Rings a bell.

But just for information purposes the entire purpose of the Linux DVD is so that you donít have to mess with the hard drive at all. You boot and run from the DVD. You are not forced to do an installation or modify the hard drive at all.
 
  #18  
Old 03-29-19, 05:55 PM
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Yes, Vmware

It’s true I can only use the DVD (in my case I used the downloaded ISO file) to test Linux but it is a bit slow and since it’s not a big deal to install Linux on Vmware which can easily be deleted afterwards, I did just that.
 
  #19  
Old 03-29-19, 10:51 PM
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My tool of choice for burning an ISO to a DVD is CD Burner XP. Despite the name, it works on later flavors of Windows, too.

For flashing an ISO to a flash drive, right now Rufus is the best one I've found.

For opening an ISO as if it were a file, I go with Daemon Tools Lite.
 
  #20  
Old 03-30-19, 06:36 AM
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@kolias-

Thatís why I also installed it on the hard drive after running from the CD, to maybe get a more realistic sense of the real world operation.

If you have any interaction with the Linux community in terms of help, and then if you get a chance some time, it might be helpful to those considering Linux to post back here and let everyone know what your assessment of the available help was. Just a thought.
 
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