Installing SSD on Desktop PC

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-10-19, 10:46 PM
kolias's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,285
Installing SSD on Desktop PC

At the moment I have one 250GB IDE hard disk installed on the SATA1 port and 2 IDE hard disks (150GB each) installed on the PRI_EIDE port (connected with 1 ribbon cable). These ports are shown on the attached snip (at the bottom right corner) and my P5K3 Deluxe Wi-Fi motherboard manual is shown on this link.

https://www.asus.com/ca-en/Motherboa...lpDesk_Manual/

I plan to install a 120GB SSD as my boot disk and connect it on the SATA1 port to replace the current 250GB HD. On the SSD I will only have the OS which is Vista32. I have no problem cloning the OS from the 250GB HD to the SSD

Is it better to install the remaining 3 hard disks on the available SATA ports? (there are a total of 6 SATA ports). Would I see a better speed? I donít know the difference between the PRI_EIDE and SATA.
 
Attached Images  
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-11-19, 02:33 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,165
Likes Received: 11
Originally Posted by kolias

At the moment I have one 250GB IDE hard disk installed on the SATA1 port and 2 IDE hard disks (150GB each) installed on the PRI_EIDE port (connected with 1 ribbon cable).
Something there doesn't quite make sense there-

An IDE drive uses a 40 pin ribbon cable, a SATA drive uses a physically different connector.



are you using an IDE to SATA adapter

to run the 250GB IDE drive on a SATA port?

Quick note, IDE, ATA, EIDE and PATA all mean "uses the "40 pin ribbon connector", but they differ as to what you can do with the drives.

Here, page 11 of the English Deluxe manual lists "Storage" which appears to indicate that the PATA 40 pin controller supports four configurations,
1) regular disk support, (you see the two 150 GD drives)
2) RAID 0 ("striping" and you see a virtual 300 GB that is ~2x faster than the individuial drives but sensitive to any bad sectors)
3) RAID 1 ("mirroring " and you have a virtual redundant/crash-resistant 150 GB drive) and
4) JBOD for "just a bunch of disks" and you see a virtual 300 GB drive.


So, here's what I'd suggest-

Just leave the 250 GB IDE drive on SATA 1, add the 120 GB SSD SATA drive on SATA 2, this makes it easier to clone the new drive at high speed, and then can just tell the BIOS to have the computer "boot from SATA2", usually with a few keystrokes.

As for the two 150 GB IDE drives, depending on how old the disks are, and how much usage they've seen, I'd consider making the in to a single 150GB RAID-1 array (mirrored for extra security). This is what I did when I added a SSD to a Vista-era computer that came with an OEM pair of spinner drives- put the older drives into a mirrored, data-redundant RAID1 array and use them for backups.

I'd suggest you download "Seagate Seatools" and run both their low-level disk health, AND run the drive information to see the total running time for each disk in the system.

Oh, I'd ALSO suggest at least updating to Windows 7 or Windows 10 so that your OS has security updates. Depending on the processor, go to 64 bit windows so that you can max out the motherboard with 8 GB of memory.
But that's another project.
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 04-11-19 at 02:59 AM.
  #3  
Old 04-11-19, 07:16 AM
kolias's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,285
Glad with your post Hal_S, very informative and I thank you for your time

I know is confusing but my 250GB hard disk has a SATA connection like the red cable in your post because I bought this disk at the same time as the motherboard.

The other two hard disks are older and only have IDE ribbon cable connections and thatís why I connect them with the ribbon cable to the motherboard.

I like your idea to leave the current 250GB on SATA 1 and connect the new SSD on SATA 2 and I will do this. I have no problem to set the BIOS to boot from the right HD.

Since the new SSD will now be the C:\Boot Drive, I will make the 250GB my D:\ and transfer all my programs to it from my older hard disks. So my older hard disks will be my E:\ and F:\ and will use them as storage / backup of older files.

I know what RAID is but I never use it because I always backup my PCís to an external USB 1.5TB Seagate HD. So I plan to connect the SSD and the other 3 hard disks to SATA 1,2.3 and 4. Do you think this is ok?

I also have the Seagate Seatools because 2 years ago I installed a new 250GB Seagate SSD in one of my laptops and that software was included and itís a nice utility but only works if you have Seagate hard disks. All my above mentioned hard disks are WD and the new SSD I plan to buy may not be Seagate depending whatís available locally.

My other 2 laptops, both 64bit, have Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 and my desktop is Vista Home 32bit. I like Vista despite the bad reputation it has but its only drawback is the 32bit which does not allow me to expend the RAM since it can only address a max of 2GB. My desktop P5K3 motherboard can take a max of 8GB RAM so it will be nice to go to another OS to take the advantage of more RAM but for now I will keep my Vista

However I will take a chance and increase the desktop RAM. Now it has 2GB but to add another 2GB for about $10.00 its worth to take the chance

The attached snip show the red SATA cable going to my current C:\ 250GB HD
 
Attached Images  
  #4  
Old 04-11-19, 09:34 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,938
kolias Ė

Iím not sure I followed properly but I think what you are saying is:

(1) You currently have one SATA drive connected to SATA port 1 and Vista is installed on that drive.

(2) You currently have 2 older IDE drives connected via a single IDE ribbon cable to the PRI_EIDE port (those IDE drives would be set as master and slave on the single cable).

(3) You will purchase an SSD thus giving you 4 drives.

(4) You want to install Vista on the SSD and connect that drive to SATA port 1 replacing the original SATA drive.

(5) You will then have the new SSD connected to SATA port 1 and now have 3 old drives: the original SATA drive and 2 IDE drives.

If thatís the case you can connect the original SATA drive to a SATA port, but you canít connect those 2 older IDE drives to the SATA ports on the motherboard unless you use a SATA-to-IDE converter for each IDE drive.

Just one more opinion here but I would make this conversion to a new configuration one step at a time:

(1) Connect your new SSD to SATA port 2.

(2) Clone the SATA drive on SATA port 1 onto the new SSD on SATA port 2.

(3) Disconnect the SATA drive from SATA port 1 and connect in the new SSD to SATA port 1.

(4) Operate this way for a while. You donít have to make any configuration changes at all.

(5) When you feel that the cloning operation has worked properly and you are satisfied you can then worry about configuring in the 3 remaining drives.

I would just take it one step at a time although the other method outlined in post #2 would work. Just my opinion.
 
  #5  
Old 04-11-19, 11:14 AM
kolias's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,285
You are absolutely right zoesdad, I guess I went to fast and didn’t think that my old IDE hard disks must remain where they are since they don’t have a SATA connection. BTW these 2 hard disks are set as “cable select” instead as “master / slave” and they both work fine.

Your idea of having the SSD on SATA1 is a good alternative.

I just thought that it may be a good idea to maintain the Vista directories on the 250GB original SATA hard disk in case the SSD somehow fails. If it does than I can switch the disks physically or thru the Boot menu and so I will not have to re install Vista. Does this sound good?
 
  #6  
Old 04-11-19, 12:49 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,938
That sounds like a good plan to me.
 
  #7  
Old 04-11-19, 12:51 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,165
Likes Received: 11
Originally Posted by kolias

However I will take a chance and increase the desktop RAM. Now it has 2GB but to add another 2GB for about $10.00 its worth to take the chance
Well, IIRC, 32-bit VISTA OS will work with 4 GB of ram, but usually recognizes 3 to 3.5 GB of usable RAM, and then usually allocates the rest to video card.

With ram at $10.00 for 2GB , I'd get 6GB NOW (with 2GB already that's for 8GB total) , because as time goes by, old RAM becomes scarce, and it will only become more expensive.

Soo, if you have existing Windows-10 64-bit computers,
If-I-Were-You, I would
A) do an image backup of the ALL of the VISTA machine hard drives to the 1.5 TB drive
(Macrium Reflect is my program of choise)
B) put in 6 more GB of ram to the desktop.
C) clone the Windows 10 laptop hard drive to the new SSD
D) install the Windows-10 SSD and boot the desktop as a Windows-10 computer.
Enter a default Windows-10 64-bit key for home/pro to get the desktop up and running. That gives you about a week to try the system out, make sure to allocate a full day to load new drivers and reboot several times as Windows-10 configures itself for the Desktop hardware.
E) Try it out for a week.
F) If you like the new setup, a Win-10 registration key is about 5-15 dollars on Ebay.
 
  #8  
Old 04-11-19, 01:45 PM
kolias's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,285
That sound very tempting Hal_S however Windows 10 is not the OS of my choice. I have it in my Lenovo Flex 5 laptop because I had no choice. Besides, my motherboard is 32bit and Windows 10 and 8.1 are 64bit so I don’t think they will work

However 32 bit Vista as far as I know can only read 2GB of RAM and the motherboard manual says the same. In addition the RAM must be in pairs and preferably from the same manufacturer.

There are 4 slots for RAM on my Desktop and slots 1 and 3 are now taken with 1GB chips each. So I was planning to get 2 more chips of 1GB each to make up the 4GB total.

But since the motherboard can take 8GB total RAM I can buy 4 chips of 2GB each which will give me a total of 8GB RAM. The question is would Vista be able to read the 2GB from one slot only?

I will buy the RAM from a used PC place I know and if the guy tells me that I can return the chips then I will by the 2 1GB each + the 4 2GB each and give them a spin.

BTW its about 5 years now I use Macrium Reflect and it’s the best backup software out there!. Prior to that I was using AIS Backup also from UK and that was also one of the best.
 
  #9  
Old 04-11-19, 02:06 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,165
Likes Received: 11
Ah, 32-bit Vista can only deal with 3 to 3.5 GB of ram.

Motherboard specs suggested it was 64-bit ready, really depends on the CPU though.
 
  #10  
Old 04-13-19, 07:33 AM
kolias's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,285
1GB RAM chips were not available so I got 2 chips (used) at 2GB each ($20 total cost)

I left the 1GB chips at their original locations (slots 1 and 3) and installed the new 2GB chis in slots 2 and 4.

After boot the system information now says:

Total installed physical memory: 6GB
Total physical memory: 3.25GB
Available physical memory: 2.12GB

I donít really understand the above but I gather that the motherboard can see the total 6GB but Vista only sees 3.25 or 2.12?

Regardless, the PC now is much much faster and Iím very happy with the results. I also got a brand-new Kingston 120GB SSD for $30 and is next on line to be installed
 
  #11  
Old 04-14-19, 08:19 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,165
Likes Received: 11
Originally Posted by kolias
I donít really understand the above but I gather that the motherboard can see the total 6GB but Vista only sees 3.25 or 2.12?

Regardless, the PC now is much much faster and Iím very happy with the results.
I also got a brand-new Kingston 120GB SSD for $30 and is next on line to be installed
That motherboard supports a 64-bit OS, but only shipped with the 32-bit Vista.
At the time it came out, there few 64 bit versions of programs (MS Office, Firefox) so there was little justification for installing the more expensive 64-bit OS.

You have a 64-bit motherboard, which sees all 6 gigs of memory.
You have a 32 bit operating system, which only see 3.5 gigs of memory.

Section 5.1 of your motherboard manual
https://www.asus.com/ca-en/Motherboa...lpDesk_Manual/
says that Asus P5K3 motherboard supports 64 bit operating systems.

I'd check to make sure you've got a 64 bit capable processor, (lookup processor in "system" then google it.

If you've got a 64 bit processor, then consider upgrading to 64-bit Windows so that the computer will access the entire 6 gigs of memory.

Windows 7 & 8 basic support has ended.
Windows 7 critical security support ends in 9 months (January 2020), then no more security updates.
Windows 8 critical support ends in 2023.

So, yep, time to think about updates, or disconnecting from the internet.
FYI, registration key for "Windows 10 Home 64-bBit" is only $5-$10 on eBay.
 
  #12  
Old 04-15-19, 06:11 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 496
Definitely consider upgrading your OS.

The SSD requires "TRIM" to help maintain performance. Basically, it gets the drive ready to accept new data in each storage location. Win 7 was the first version to fully implement TRIM.

You might find a utility from your SSD manufacturer that supports TRIM.

Without TRIM performance will take a big hit.
 
  #13  
Old 04-15-19, 06:18 PM
kolias's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,285
When I cloned the SSD I noticed that TRIM was enabled
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes