Vista vs Windows 7

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  #1  
Old 04-13-19, 07:56 AM
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Vista vs Windows 7

My desktop PC with a 32bit motherboard runs on Vista32 Home Premium and Iím thinking to change the OS and install Windows 7 (I donít want 8.1 or 10 since I have those in my laptops).

I have some utilities which run fine on my Vista and I donít want to lose them and I know these utilities do not run in Windows 8.1 or 10 (both 64bits machines), despite that I selected in the compatibility mode XP or Vista.

Does anyone knows if the Windows 7 architecture is similar to Vista?

Or perhaps my utilities donít run in my laptops because both are 64bits machines?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-13-19, 02:15 PM
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To my knowledge, Vista, 7, 8/8.1, and 10 are all very similar. Many times you can use an older driver in Win 10 if there is no specific Win 10 driver for the device. If your utilities are 16-bit apps, that would explain why they won't run in your 64-bit laptops. Without knowing what the utilities in question are, it's impossible to say (just a guess).
 
  #3  
Old 04-13-19, 07:33 PM
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Back in the day, I would take 7 over Vista any day of the week. Vista had many problems when it was released with device compatibility. Almost all were solved when Windows 7 was released.
 
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Old 04-13-19, 09:27 PM
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I know the reputation Vista has Tolyn but for me Vista has been one of the best OS. I got it when I bought a Dell laptop which I kept for about 6 years and never had any problems neither a single crash. It still works beautifully on my old desktop and still love it.

Never used Windows 7 but Windows 8.1 is my next best choice.
 
  #5  
Old 04-14-19, 05:16 AM
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Sounds like you like and prefer Vista, so not sure why you're asking this question.?? You're arguing a reply when you asked which one. Sorry, but this doesn't make sense to me.
 
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Old 04-14-19, 05:28 AM
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I always preferred Windows 7 even over Windows 8. It wasn't until Windows 10 was released that I changed to a different OS than 7. To each their own.
 
  #7  
Old 04-14-19, 05:51 AM
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I was going to post a close response as Tolyn did in post #3. If you like Vista, after about a week with Windows 7 you'll be dancing on the ceiling.
To answer your specific question, I think anything that will run on Vista, will run on 7. I dont know of anything that would not run on 7 vs Vista.

Just to mention this, I havent checked so I dont know, but I really dont know if Windows 7 is even supported any more. If not, you're likely too run into issues with needed updates & fixes. Those may not be available.

Personally, If I could go back, XP would be my version for the rest of my life but, since I cant, & like you, I dont like 10 because of the way its set up, but I'd take 10 before I tried to install 7 if its not supported any longer.
 
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Old 04-14-19, 08:03 AM
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No question that 7 is better than Vista but my question was if 7 will run all the programs I now have on Vista and I gather perhaps not mainly because my Vista and motherboard are 32bit.

Windows 7 and XP are not supported anymore and its even hard to find them.

What I think to do is try to get Windows 7 (32 bit if available) and install it alongside Vista (dual boot) and if 7 will run all my programs then I will remove Vista.
 
  #9  
Old 04-14-19, 08:28 AM
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Windows 7 should run all programs that ran on Vista as it is a newer OS (unlike running older programs on Vista when it was released, but that is another discussion) You can also run programs in compatibility mode in Windows 7 which will emulate an older version of windows. I have run older Win XP programs on Win 7 using compatibility mode and they ran just fine. IMO Duel boot is unnecessary but might be fun to play with.

Win 7 support is ending next year. https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/wind...dows-7-support That doesn't mean it will no longer work, they will just no longer release updates for it.
 
  #10  
Old 04-14-19, 09:28 AM
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Being that 7 support is still available until 2020, I dont see a problem with upgrading to 7. And thats another thing, do you have a full "New" install of windows 7 or are you going to have to buy a copy. If so, since 7 was the next version after Vista, just buy an upgrade from Vista to 7. It'll be cheaper.
If you have a full new version of 7, make sure that you havent used all of the shared copies available on that disc etc. Each new copy of windows allows 2 or 3 copies or shares using the same serial number. If you have already used all your copies available for that serial number, you're gonna get it installed then not be able to use it. I'm just saying be sure before you start that project.

Again, because 7 was the next version after Vista, I don't see any reason why the current software you have wont work. I am using a software on windows 10 that was from 2001 I think. That was back during ME / 2000. I think XP came out in 2002. I'd think the next question to review would be if there is still support available for your software. If so, it most certainly has an upgrade from your current version to a windows 7 compatibility.... if there were any compatibility issues at all. I cant remember but I think 7 came with an auto software updater thingy, which automatically updates new software added like in your situation.

Anyway, good luck, I hope all this advice helps you think everything through before you make a final decision & it all works for you.
 
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Old 04-14-19, 02:02 PM
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Spend $20 and get another 2 GB of ram.
Spend ~$25 and get the fastest processor that 775 motherboard will support.
Spend $7 to upgrade to Windows 10-64 Bit.

It's worth it.

The oldest desktop/tower I have is a Dell Dimension 5150, which is old enough to drive, old enough to buy you a drink in-some-states.


It is currently running
Windows Pro 64-bit with 4GB of memory, (it sees 3.25) on a Pentium D 945.
Storage is 2 salvaged netbook spinner drives, 250 GB and 125 GB.
It runs 64-bit MS Office 2010, Chrome, Firefox, Pandora, Youtube.
Video "upgrade" is a $5 ATI Radeon x600 card (which can output dual 1080i HD monitors).

It shipped, top-of-the-line, with Windows XP 32-bit, 512K of ram, MS Office, and SVGA monitor. That was ONLY $2,200 (oh dear lord, don't remind me that I ever paid that much...)

And it works perfectly... Mostly.
Yeah, you have to "hit F1 to continue" every time it reboots, because the BIOS doesn't recognize the later-made processor. But otherwise, great day to day computer.
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 04-14-19 at 03:55 PM.
  #12  
Old 04-14-19, 03:03 PM
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Windows 7 was only half-jokingly called Vista SP1 because it really was little more than a few kernel tweaks different. Win7 is what Vista always should have been and would have been if M$ hadn't been in such a rush to get it to market. Basically Vista had such pathetic market penetration that M$ decided to ditch the Vista name and rebrand it rather than fix it under the same name.
 
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Old 04-14-19, 08:08 PM
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When dealing with things this old (Windows 7 is a 10 year old OS by itself...) I would leave well enough alone. If you happen to break something, there is likely no going back.
 
  #14  
Old 04-15-19, 12:19 AM
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I don't have Windows 7 so I will see how I can get it.

My thanks to all
 
  #15  
Old 04-16-19, 06:32 AM
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Originally Posted by stickshift
When dealing with things this old (Windows 7 is a 10 year old OS by itself...) I would leave well enough alone. If you happen to break something, there is likely no going back.
I generally agree, BUT, that is why you make a disk-image of the current setup BEFORE you try and upgrade.

Quick example - you make a backup "disk images" of the existing C:\ drive with Windows Vista. I use Macrium Reflect.

You try upgrading the OS on C:\ drive to Windows 7, or to Windows 10.

If it doesn't work, you just restore the old C:\ drive back to C:\ drive and you're back to running Windows 7.

I have a 1 Terrabyte external drive for backups, so I've saved backups of various configurations of Windows 10 on the computer (Home/Pro then 32-bit/64-bit, then Office 2003 verus Office 2011.

Having a backup drive with a few complete disk images can be very convenient.
If the setup doesen't work, you "flash" the machine back to the prior working condition.


Should also mention that Macrium allows you to "Mount" the disk image file in the same way you mount an ISO image of a cd or DVD. You can load up your prior OS configuration as a virtual drive, copy files.
With a faster computer, you can also "RUN" the disk image as a "Virtual Machine" so you can effectively "boot up" your old Vista OS computer and run it on a newer machine.
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 04-16-19 at 07:47 AM.
  #16  
Old 04-17-19, 08:44 AM
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All the big box manufacturers started putting a hidden recovery partition on their hard drives back about (late) WinXP to save the expense of including a recovery DVD, so I'm thinking an OE Vista install on a Dell box should have one. You can check the documentation to confirm. If it does, so long as you don't tell the Win7 install to overwrite the hidden partition (and I'm not sure it will even 'see' it), you can use the OE recovery partition to revert to Vista after you've installed Win7. Your pet programs and preferences will be have to be reinstalled but if it's still running on the factory Vista install, it's a bit long in the tooth and a fresh install would cheer it up anyway.
 
  #17  
Old 04-17-19, 09:38 AM
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Good point-
I can confirm that Macrium Reflect DOES see the OEM recovery partition.

I HIGHLY suggest that anybody doing updates/upgrades to an old computer make a separate partition-image of the OEM rescue-partition. They're usually small, but tend to have some VERY powerful disk/memory/OEM configuration functions.
 
  #18  
Old 04-17-19, 11:19 AM
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The only problem I see is that if you revert to Vista from the OEM recovery-partition, you will have many many updates that will need to be applied to get you back to your current state. That did not go well for me when I reinstalled Vista from the originals disks.

Got into some kind of loop and could never get past the Service Pack 1 update. The right hand said it was installed and the left hand kept insisting it still needed to be installed. Tried all kinds of combinations of the updates, but finally gave up and installed Windows 7.

(I guess, of course, those updates aren't even available today)
 
  #19  
Old 04-17-19, 12:45 PM
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There haven't been any new patches/updates for Vista in a couple of years but all of the patches have been rolled up into SP1 and SP2.

You can download SP1 here.

...and you can down SP2 here. They are 571 and 366 MB, respectively.

However, before you can install the service packs you will need to install two or three (depending on which installation media you're using) of the following patches:

KB937287

KB938371

KB935509


All five links are to M$.com itself and each of the the three patches is <10MB. I didn't see any notation at M$ saying how much longer those would be available but I wouldn't expect them to disappear any time soon. Still, you could do worse that to download them ASAP to make sure you have them available. I just stashed them away for safekeeping, and because I'm a data packrat.

In addition, if you're going on the WWW with this PC you're probably going to need some .NET updates for browsing, but you'll have to deal with those as they come up. And as best as I can recall, they stopped updating Internet Explorer for Vista at IE8, which itself is obsolete (probably no longer supported by Adobe Flash or Oracle Java) so you'll probably want to pick another browser.
 
  #20  
Old 04-17-19, 02:31 PM
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I think it was just a few months back I installed Vista in my desktop to replace XP. The Vista DVD I had it from a Dell laptop I bought a few years back.

The Internet is normally disabled when I use the desktop but I turn it ON during the installation and at the end of the installation I went to updates and it found tons of them including the .NET. Now Windows says Vista......SP2 so I think I have them all.

I’m searching now to find Windows 7
 
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