Window 7 pro to Window 10

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Old 12-07-19, 12:30 PM
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Window 7 pro to Window 10

I am not computer literate: Copied from Computer Properties menu (Processor-intel(R) Core (TM), 2 DUO CPU, P7350 @ 2.00GHz-2.00GHz)
Installed Memory 3.00GB
64 Bit operating system

Running Windows 7 Pro on HP DC7- 2173. As of Jan 2020, Microsoft will no longer provide support and a local computer shop said I probly would not have issues for a couple of years. I am not looking forward to switching to windows 10 but it appears inevitable and if I understand correctly window 10 can be installed by itself w/ little if any input for the operator, so my question is since I do not have a clue regarding the inner workings of a computer would it be best to have a shop install windows 10 and possibly add any component(s) required for the upgrade(?)

Comments/Suggestions appreciated.
 

Last edited by lightspeed; 12-07-19 at 02:40 PM.
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12-08-19, 02:12 PM
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FWIW....Stick with what you have until such time you are forced to get new computer.
 
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Old 12-07-19, 04:56 PM
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I suppose a lot depends on how you use your computer. Tell us how you use it. What type of programs do you run? What type of browsing do you do? Does your computer run or inter act with any other equipment? I suspect you local computer shop is correct. But by then Win 10 maybe phasing out for something new and you'll be on the back end again.

Just a general comment (not directed at the OP)

At this late date why is anybody still using any Win OS older than Win 10? If you're a Windows platform user I don't understated why people are so reluctant to update to the new OS's after about the first year (allow for the bugs to shake out)? And every version of Windows has had it's dis-tractors and yet those same people complain when the current version is no longer supported and a new version is rolled out. It's a viscous cycle.

I'm old enough to remember when Win 95 was current and Win 98 made it's debut. All kinds of naysayers said 98 was no good. Here's the list of Win versions. On every single one there was an outcry of foul. And yet the precious one before the new version came became a favorite. Maybe WinMe was an exception and possibly VISTA. But even those were fine for the job at hand. They worked. And just to set the record straight at any current time MAC and LINUX were no picnic in the park. They too had and still do their share of problems.I used every single one of these version with the exception of Windows Mobile and never had any major problems.
 
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Old 12-08-19, 01:55 AM
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The main issue you could have is finding stable drivers for your system. I had to search and keep updating my sound drivers to finally get my sound to work upgrading an old laptop. You can search the manufacturer and try to find a driver that works. I found a real tech driver that finally worked.
 
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Old 12-08-19, 06:35 AM
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I never update to a new Windows until it is out there and proven stable.
I upgraded to Windows 10 a year ago and it went smoothly, also it has improved since then.

Whether you do it or get a shop to do it I highly recommend you back up all data ,pictures etc, and any install programs for programs that you have.
Depending on how much you have either use a stick or get an external drive,
With an external drive you could even do a disk image but I would still back up the above in a separate folder.

When I did mine it kept a copy of my Windows 7 on the computer for 30 days so I could revert back to it if I wanted. I am not sure that this is still the case.

If you have programs that do not want to run the first thing to try is to "Run as administrator"
Next is to run them in compatibility mode.

I am a critical user but I am happy with Windows 10.
Never did install Windows Millennium or Vista as in my opinion they were both dogs,
For years it seemed that Microsoft's every second Windows was crap, that is not the case with Windows 10.

It is also relatively easy to make it look like Windows 7 if that is what you prefer.
 
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Old 12-08-19, 10:56 AM
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I can not over emphasis my lack of understanding when it comes to computers, electronic equipment, or hi-tech instruments in general, my family and friends consider me a dinosaur.
I use the computer as a source of information, whether keeping up with current events and/or storing information and a majority of the shopping is done online.

I have an external drive but it appears the only option offered on this computer is to transfer files to disc? I also have concerns allowing computer tech access to documents and information regarding personal and financial links.
I agree with the comments that it would be best to upgrade to window 10 whether installed on my computer or check with a knowledgeable computer tech as to recommend a computer as a replacement.

I can not thank Y'all enough for comments and suggestions!!
 
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Old 12-08-19, 02:12 PM
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FWIW....Stick with what you have until such time you are forced to get new computer.
 
lightspeed, tribe_fan voted this post useful.
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Old 12-08-19, 05:08 PM
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Agree, intend to hold off since my next must purchase is a portable generator; in the meantime, likely try a 'do it myself' window 10 upgrade until I decide on a replacement computer.

Again, I appreciate the comments and suggestions!
 
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Old 12-09-19, 02:39 PM
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Since it sounds like you have an external hard drive, I would suggest the following.

1) Download the free home version of Macrium Reflect (backup software) from https://www.macrium.com/reflectfree

2) Install Macrium Reflect and make a bootable CD from the software.

3) Make a backup (image) of your current Win7 to the external HD using Macrium Reflect.

4) Download and install Windows 10 to your computer after downloading and saving Win10 drivers for your peripherals (video, sound, network, etc.). You should be able to activate Win10 using your Win7 key.

5) After Win10 is installed, install any necessary drivers you previously downloaded.

6) If everything works OK, you're all set. If you run into problems with Win10, boot from the Macrium Reflect boot disk and restore the Win7 image. Your computer should now be exactly the same (Win7) as it was when you made the backup image.
 
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Old 12-09-19, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by lightspeed
in the meantime, likely try a 'do it myself' window 10 upgrade until I decide on a replacement computer.
Generally agree with Bob1425 above, however with some caveats-

First, I'd strongly suggest asking whoever is your most tech-savvy relative to give you a hand for the day when you try this.

Second, I'd strongly consider picking up a new Solid-State-Drive ("SSD") from any big box store to create a "complete clone" (not "file only") of the hard drive. Adding a new hard drive generally means opening up the computer case, sliding in the new drive, hooking up a power cord and a data cord, then restarting and holding down a key to get into BIOS to tell the computer to "see" the new drive. The SSD drives are much faster than older drives, and you can probably get a new drive with 3x or 4x your existing hard drive's storage for a reasonable price.
That is helpful, because that means you can divide the NEW SSD disk into 3 "logical drives (C:\ and D:\, and E:\) that are as large or larger than your current "C:" drive. What I'd do then is copy ALL of your files to the SSD's E:\ drive. Then, CLONE the current C:\ drive TWICE, one onto SSD's D:\drive and AGAIN on the SSD's C:\ drive.
Remove the old hard drive and put it in a safe place.
Boot from the SSD's C:\ drive and update that from Win7 to Win 10.
If you don't like it, you can still boot your original Win7 setup from the SSD's D:\ drive.

Third, I'd run some basic virus checks and error checks with Windows-Defender, trial version of malware bytes, BEFORE you clone the hard drive- because if you start with bad copy, you'll have more work than necessary.
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 12-09-19 at 03:58 PM.
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Old 12-09-19, 07:12 PM
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I might add that you check on how many MB you have actually used on your current computer before you buy a new SSD. You may find that you don't need one as large as you might think. I was kinda surprised that I only used less than a third of the 1 TB hard drive in my desktop in the 10 years I have had it, so I replaced it with a 500MB knowing I will never fill it up.
 
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Old 12-10-19, 07:04 AM
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Over the years some users found it better to skip one or two versions and then upgrading to the next version to save on having to buy each and every version. While skipping and waiting, those users would usually find out which versions that were dogs.

There is a disadvantage in buying a very large drive for a machine that can hold more than one hard drive. Windows 7 and 10 will not restore a backup system image onto a new hard drive that is smaller than the one before, even if the C: volume was smaller than the hard drive and shared the hard drive with other volumes C:, E:, etc.

Windows 10 might be the last Windows system that users can buy. Thereafter users may only be able to rent Windows i.e. pay a fee every year. This is only a rumor I hear so far..
 
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Old 12-10-19, 07:47 AM
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=AllanJThere is a disadvantage in buying a very large drive for a machine that can hold more than one hard drive. Windows 7 and 10 will not restore a backup system image onto a new hard drive that is smaller than the one before, even if the C: volume was smaller than the hard drive and shared the hard drive with other volumes C:, E:, etc.
Correct, and IMPORTANT.

And that's why I like Macrium Reflect (free), because it WILL let you make an IMAGE of a large disk and put it on a smaller disk.
And boot that image as a virtual computer on ANOTHER computer.

Real World Example-
Coworker with laptop with 500 GB HD (only used ~100 GB) has a problem.

Family member replied to "Microsoft Tech Storage scam", scammer password-locks them out of their laptop, wants $250 to unlock, then $500, then $750 etc.

1) Remove 500 GB HD from laptop, make "disk image" of the 90 GB of used space, disk image file just fits on 64GB usb drive.

2) Start MY computer with 8 GB memory, boot 64 GB "disk image" as virtual laptop.

3) Try various fixes on "virtual laptop computer." If it doesn't work, re-start "virtual laptop" until able to re-enable hidden Win10 Administrator Account on "virtual laptop"

4) Purchase 240 GB SSD from Best Buy for $34.99 (price is now $28.99)

5) Clone disk image onto 240 GB SSD. Install SSD in laptop.

6) Boot laptop, enable hidden Admin account, retake control of laptop.

7) Clean laptop, for virus, malware. Setup user accounts, auto backups to 64 GM SD card.

8) Wipe hidden admin account, return laptop to VERY HAPPY co-worker.
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 12-10-19 at 08:12 AM.
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Old 12-11-19, 12:09 PM
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I have decided to keep the Win 7 for the next couple of months while I review and study U'alls comments and suggestions.

There is 550 GB free space on my computer and 950 GB of free space on the external drive WD/ 'My Passport' ultra I use primarily for storing photos and documents. I thought I would purchase a separate SSD specifically for the Wiin 10 upgrade.

I bookmarked Macrium.com and after reviewing and studying member's comments and suggestions I could experiment and/or practice using the free space in 'My Passport' in transitioning from Win 7 to Win 10 upgrade.

Again, I can not thank U'all the information is very helpful!!
 
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Old 12-27-19, 10:04 AM
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FYI

New article on ZDnet today, free upgrade to Win10 still works.

This free Windows 10 upgrade offer still works. Here's why -- and how to get it
More than three years after Microsoft’s free upgrade offer officially ended, people are still reporting successful Windows 10 upgrades from older machines. Here’s the latest extremely unofficial report.
https://www.zdnet.com/article/this-f...46523935910068
If you have an external drive with ~2x the size of your hard drive, you COULD easily update to Win10 but easily revert back to Win7 if you want.

You would save a Macrium disk image of your complete Win7 boot drive setup.
Use the free upgrade to Win10 and save a Macrium disk image of that complete boot drive setup.
That would give you a Win7 disk image and a Win10 disk image.
You could #1 write either Win7 or Win10 image to the boot drive and run either version of windows, or #2 boot either disk image as a virtual machine on fast computer with sufficient memory. And #3 you could add another hard drive and run both Win7 and Win10 on the same computer.

Might be easier than purchasing Win10 when the time comes.
 
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Old 12-28-19, 03:03 AM
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I did the free upgrade on this computer a couple months ago - could not have been simpler and everything is working as expected. You claim tech ignorance but you have to have a friend or three qualified to do this for you, if you so desire.
 
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Old 12-28-19, 02:38 PM
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Yes, I do intend hanging onto this computer until such time as I am no longer able to obtain drivers or/or software to keep it functioning; although it seems the closer to the termination updates I have been experiencing frequent cyber glitches?

After the holidays, I intend purchasing an external hard drive and I have someone who I can have review the comments and suggestions and help with the Win 10 and/or Win 7 transition.

Again, I thank U all for the input, greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 12-28-19, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by lightspeed
it seems the closer to the termination updates I have been experiencing frequent cyber glitches?
Suggestion check the hard drive for errors, ASAP.

1) Run Win7 file-explorer, C:\ drive, Properties, Tools, Error Checking.

2) Run as adminstrator, the chkdsk program.

3) Download and run Seagate Sea Tools, and run all tests - SMART reporting, SHORT drive test, LONG drive test.

I found out the hard way that windows "Error Checking" can mask lots of disk errors, and you get "no problem" until the hard drive actually starts failing to read/write.
 
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