Fios and Moca?

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  #1  
Old 02-09-20, 10:39 PM
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Fios and Moca?

Hi All,

I have FIOS, and I'm trying to bring very fast internet to my smart TV so I can stream 4k (which needs something like at least 25 Mbps or so). Unfortunately, I can't put the FIOS modem/router next to where the TV is (and its too far away for a good wifi signal), so I am looking for alternatives. I tried TP-Link powerline gigabit adapters (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06WP2ZT5N/), but I'm only getting between 10 and 20 Mbps.

I'm wondering if the moca technology is something I can use (I do have a coax cable right next to my smart TV). So, can I basically just buy a moca adapter, plug the coax thats already next to my smart TV into the adapter, then run an ethernet cable between the moca adapter and the smart TV? If it helps, I took a picture of my FIOS ONT box; I also took a picture of the moca bypass amplifier.

The order of everything is ONT has coax cable running from its "video/MoCa output" to the Moca bypass amplifier. Then the Moca bypass amplifier has a coax cable running to a coax splitter. Then, there are half a dozen coax cables going from the splitter to different rooms in my house.

On the ONT picture, it may be hard to see, so: the following lights are lit green: Power, Network, OMI, MoCA. The following lights are off: Battery, Fail, Video, POTS. There is also an ethernet jack (presumably RJ-45) with nothing plugged into it.

So, can I just buy a single moca adapter, plug it into a coax cable in one of my rooms, and get ethernet internet out of it?

What about the ethernet jack in the ONT? Is it usable for this? If so, I could run an ethernet cable from it to where my smart TV is.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

(Also, I know the easiest thing would be to just put the modem/router next to the smart TV, but I've apparently been having lots of interference from the modem/router, causing all sorts of interference sounds with my receiver/speaker set up, so I really want to keep the modem/router away from the receiver/speakers).

Thanks for any help!
 
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  #2  
Old 02-10-20, 08:44 AM
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I have something similar to what you're thinking,
I'm using left over FIOS Actiontec routers over MOCA. When I upgraded routers, I kept the old Mi424Wr Actiontec routers. You can probably find one for $5 if you look through a local thrift shop or yard sale (oldest is black 1 antenna, newer are red with 2 antennae)



You have to reset the Actiontec routers and configure as "MOCA access point" (you can google search
for instructions). Once the Actiontec is configured for MOCA, you physically detach the cable from the back of the cable box, attach a FIOS splitter, then 2 cables, one to cable box, one to Actiontec.
Once it boots you connect the smart TV and Actiontec with an ethernet cable.

I'm getting about 25 Mbps over Wifi, would expect ethernet to be a bit faster.
 
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Last edited by Hal_S; 02-10-20 at 09:22 AM.
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Old 02-10-20, 08:59 AM
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Thanks for the advice, Hal.

I guess what I'm doing is sort of the same thing? The item I had my eye on was also an actiontec thing, but apparently meant for being solely a Moca access point (I think?): https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FKTMWDE Its less than $20 to buy.

So, is this the only item I would need? I could just plug this directly into an unused coaxial cable in the wall in one of our rooms? I would rename the SSID/password to match my current wifi, and then it would give me wifi coverage from it with regular speeds? I know handing off between same-named SSIDs is not anywhere near as good as what a business would get, but I think this would work acceptably. Thoughts?

Thanks!

Thanks again!
 
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Old 02-10-20, 09:27 AM
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I've added a photo- of basically what you'd do - MOCA to ethernet, then ethernet cable (blue in my photo).

Detach cable from cable box, to MOCA-friendly splitter, 2 leads, one to box, other to MOCA adepater.

For WiFi, I've had good results with using the same SSID, same password, but different channel.
This lets the device simply switch CHANNELS, without switching ID and login.

 
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Old 02-10-20, 09:49 AM
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Hi Hal,

Thanks for the further advice.

I think that part of your initial post I understood. What I am trying to figure out is if I need two devices of some sort. I've read online that under some scenarios, two devices are required (I think one from the modem and then another in the room in which you want the new moca access point- I think).

With my scenario, is the device I linked to on Amazon the only device I would need? Do I need any other devices at all?

Also, the room in which I'd like to put the new device does not have a TV or stb...in that case, no reason to get a moca splitter, is there? (Anyway, how can I tell the difference between a moca splitter and a regular coax splitter?)

Thanks yet again!
 
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Old 02-10-20, 03:39 PM
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Re-reading your post
I tried TP-Link powerline gigabit adapters (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06WP2ZT5N/), but I'm only getting between 10 and 20 Mbps.
If you've got gigabit adapters, but are only getting 10-20 Mbps, that suggests they have a bad connection AND/OR are on different "legs" of the house power
This means you MIGHT have a simpler solution - figure out which circuit breakers serve the two circuits that you have the powerline adapters. Swap ONE of those circuit breakers with the breaker above/below the current breaker.

Retest the connection speed.

 
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Old 02-10-20, 03:59 PM
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Thanks for the thought on the powerline adapters.

Yes, they are gigabit (although I only pay for 75/75 from FIOS, so a bit of overkill with the adapters). Anyway, switching the circuit breakers is a bit beyond my abilities, I think. (Also, there is a subpanel involved.) Also, TP provides a utility, and it shows that the two adapters are communicating at ~325 Mbps, so I don't know why I'm getting such slow speeds out of them.

Anyway, regarding the Moca question - is the Actiontec network extender / ethernet over coax device I linked to on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FKTMWDE) the only device I would need? Or would I need a second device to do what I want?

(The heck of all this is that everything was working perfectly except my av receiver / 7.1.2 set-up is getting awful bursts of zapping static. The FIOS tech support person convinced me that it was due to the router, so I moved it...but still getting the static. I'm thinking (hoping!) it may also be due to the powerline adapters, so I'm trying to remove those from the equation. Other than that, I'm at a loss...and I can't move the fios router back to near the smart TV because my wife has now decided she likes the way it looks now without the router there!)

Looking forward to your thoughts on whether the actiontec device I linked to on Amazon is all I need, or if I'll need something else.

Thanks again!
 
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Old 02-11-20, 03:40 PM
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Maybe I'm behind the times. I used MoCA in my previous home which was wired with coax but not with Ethernet. It worked fantastic, infinitely better than powerline adapters. I had literally no speed loss compared to wired Ethernet.

My MoCA adapters did not include WiFi. So maybe I'm not up-to-date on how newer ones work. But I needed 2 MoCA adapters. It went Ethernet <-> MoCA <-> Coax <-> MoCA <-> Ethernet. I don't see how one adapter could work alone. You have to demodulate as well as modulate.

As for splitters, you just need enough bandwidth. The MoCA signal lives in the high frequencies above cable TV frequencies, which is why it's not compatible with satellite TV.

EDIT: D'oh. I took a closer look at the photo and see there is already one end of the MoCA connection. So yes, only one more adapter would be needed at the other end of the coax.
 

Last edited by RocketJSquirrel; 02-11-20 at 03:45 PM. Reason: Correct my failure to understand the OP
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