Booster for router


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Old 07-17-20, 09:06 AM
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Booster for router

Moved to a 1500 sq ft condo , we have the basic optimum router , which my wife insists must be in our bedroom (she has no troubles) . I get lots of drop out and connectivity problems , both with the TV's (using amazon fire sticks) and also trouble with my internet , especially when my twins are on their i pads . Looking to put a booster in our living room , any thoughts on a reasonably priced one ?
 
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Old 07-17-20, 11:47 AM
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U running all items thru wi-fi? I'd have my main computer and tv appliances on ethernet, but i guess u use fire sticks. U need a whammy router... with all u got, I'd either look for a small mesh system or a Mimo dual band, at least AC 3000+, or you could add a router to your existing system if u configure it right. You may also check that your ISP is getting you at a min of 1MB speed.
 
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Old 07-17-20, 04:21 PM
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You can try wifi extenders to expand the wifi coverage. A mesh wifi system which would cost more. You can also try to find a powerline wifi kit which is what I used until recently. You connect a powerline box to your router and a nearby wall outlet. That routes the internet through your electrical wires. Then you plug a powerline wifi box on the other end of the house. It takes the internet signal from your wires and rebroadcasts it with wifi. They work well inside. I eventually
wired my home so I stopped using mine.
 
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Old 07-18-20, 06:51 AM
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Thank you , seems like the Powerline is better than an extender , as there is some signal degradation with an extender . Powerline go thru the electrical lines , and this is not a very old complex , so the electrical wiring should be pretty good .
 
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Old 07-18-20, 08:15 AM
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also trouble with my internet , especially when my twins are on their i pads
The issue might be more of a bandwidth issue than wifi signal. The more devices that are using the internet connection the slower things will get until there is packet loss and buffering. Especially if everybody is trying to stream video.

Go to speettest.net and see what speeds you are getting and what you are paying for. Then do another test when everybody is on hogging bandwidth and see if your speeds have dropped.
 
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Old 07-18-20, 03:16 PM
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IMHO that is very good advice from Tolyn Ironhand. I think it would be good if you can try to separate out any bandwidth issues from wifi issues.
 
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Old 07-24-20, 01:02 PM
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Just a thought. If you have pre-installed COAX cable you can run Ethernet over COAX. You loose some performance but still should be sufficient.
 
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Old 08-01-20, 04:44 AM
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Boosters can have really negative effects to your Wi-Fi's functionality and speed, especially if you're unsure how to optimize the connection. I would HIGHLY recommend getting a mesh network router system, even for 1500 SQ ft you could get by with Google's mesh routers or even 2 Linksys Velop routers.

No speed loss for multiple nodes in place, max signal strength for your home even on multiple levels. Even allows you to "hardwire" into a secondary node for gaming systems or PC's for max bandwidth (gaming/etc)

Edit: As far as the velops go, the reason they're so efficient is due to them being "smart" connections. You only see one wifi connection, but they have Tri-band versions that will automatically place your devices in 2.4 or 5g bands depending on where they will run the best. (2.4 = longer range slower data speed 5g= SHORT range and high data speed)
 
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Old 08-01-20, 09:10 AM
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What's the make/model of the modem/router?

Originally Posted by dennjim
which my wife insists must be in our bedroom
Well, that's the first problem- Main bedroom is almost always a corner, you want the router / wifi to be as close to the center of the house as possible to get even coverage.
A one-floor condo that is ~1,500 square feet is just under 40 x 40, so you would never be more than 20 feet from the router, IF you found a way to mount it in a central location. Two story is around 30 x 30, and if you mount the router centrally, you're not more than 15 feet from the router.

Second, many new routers use 5Gh signals instead of the 2.4Gh signals, but that trades speed for signal penetration- you get faster speeds with 5Gh but the signal is attenuated by drywall, so if the router signal has to go through 2 or 3 walls or floors you loose most of the signal. To get around that, many routers can downgrade from the TECHICALLY faster 802.11AC band to better penetrating 802.11 G band so that the WiFi signal can travel further.

Third, in a condo, it's likely that everyone's WiFi is set to the same channel by default. There are several "WiFi Analyzer" apps out there, check to see what range is least crowded by other signals. You can then adjust YOUR WiFi network to use a band that isn't as crowded.

Fourth, given all the problems mentioned above, in some situations, the WiFi will only "talk" at the speed of the slowest connection. So if you have one device that has a slow WiFi connection because it's physically far away, has to go through 4 walls, and on a crowded WiFi channel, that one device may be slowing down all of your WiFi connections.

Fifth consider setting up a guest/kids WiFi channel to balance the loads. Many newer routers support a "guest network" that is on a separate antenna, and can broadcast on a different standard. As an example, I've got a "guest" network setup to use 802.11G to cover the back yard, while the main network is 802.11 AC inside the house.
 
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Old 08-01-20, 10:31 AM
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in a condo, it's likely that everyone's WiFi is set to the same channel by default. There are several "WiFi Analyzer" apps out there, check to see what range is least crowded by other signals. You can then adjust YOUR WiFi network to use a band that isn't as crowded.
Even worse: wireless routers are usually set to "auto" channel by default. This means they can hop around and interfere with everyone. You can determine whether this is happening by looking at WiFi traffic over time. I had to visit a neighbor after he bought a new router so I could set up his channels not to be auto. You should never use auto. Find the least crowded channels and stay there.

Recommended 2.4 GHz channels are 1, 6, & 11, as they don't overlap each other. Neighbors using other channels overlap others. Adjacent-channel interference is worse than same-channel interference.

To the original question: 1500 square feet should be easily covered by a single wireless router without any extra hardware. As mentioned above, it should be in the center of the condo. It should also be elevated as high as possible and away from potential noise emitters like microwave ovens.
 
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Old 08-01-20, 11:36 AM
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Oh, you CAN also TURN OFF "Broadcast SSID" on the odd chance that somebody is trying to piggyback on your WiFi; (it's not very likely given random network names and password protection, but you never know.)

You can also change the SSID AFTER turning off SSID broadcast, (you WILL have to go back and enter new WiFi network SSID under "HIDDEN NETWORKS" AND forget the old SSID.
This can help with the innocent but annoying situation where neighbors inadvertently tap on YOUR WiFi,
(since everyone in the condo sees a long list of random network names on the screen, you KNOW that people will tap on the wrong WiFi network. The problem is that now their device is going to try and connect to your network. It won't connect because it won't have the password, BUT repeated attempts to connect still chew up your WiFi router's bandwidth.
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 08-01-20 at 12:19 PM.
 

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