Chromebooks


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Old 06-25-21, 06:14 AM
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Chromebooks

My wife has had a Chromebook for years. It is no longer supported by Google as of June 2022.
It is perfect for one who runs off of their internet in the house and is not too techy. it takes care of itself, is very secure, and can do as much as you ask it to do.
You can pay $200 but you get what you pay for-16GB RAM, SSD not emme and 128GB storage runs about $550.
We have an Acer and never any trouble, This was a low end, Does anyone else have one they wish to suggest as a replacement?
 
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Old 06-25-21, 07:10 PM
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I've had good luck with HP chromebooks. But one of the really nice things about Chromebooks is that they run really well on middle-of-the-road hardware.
 
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Old 06-26-21, 01:24 AM
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Our school district gives these to our kids, working as an engineer I feel they are pieces of junk, especially the software that they come with, not compatible with anything and a terrible introduction to the computing world.

Now that my kids are older and have decent Windows based lap tops they confirm those things were only good for shielding snow balls and carrying their lunch's to the table!
 
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Old 07-01-21, 07:12 AM
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Piece of junk is an inappropriate term within the context of this conversation.
An engineer should have more intelligence than to contribute negative comments.
They serve their place and for some people and for some job types are a meaningful tool. We are not sending a rocket to space here.
Not everyone can afford a high end device yet need to accomplish a task which this dies well.
You have taken this out of context.
 
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Old 07-01-21, 02:22 PM
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As an engineer, I will provide my best engineering evaluation, they are crap!
 
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Old 07-01-21, 03:14 PM
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Elitism

Your attitude smacks of elitism.
 
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Old 07-01-21, 05:04 PM
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Your attitude smacks of elitism.
No, it's called reality!

They don't use Chromebook's in any business/engineering environment, why, because its a POS tool used for grammar schools, and at that it fails. it's just a simple fact of life!

Not everyone can afford a high end device
Are you kidding, I just bought my Mom a rebuilt HP computer with i5 dual core processor, it will kick ass on anything short of high end gaming and it set me back a whopping $300 dollars, decent computers, especially rebuilt, are dirt cheap!
 
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Old 07-01-21, 07:34 PM
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IMO, it's all about expectations and picking the right tool for the job.

I wouldn't use a Chromebook for work because most of the work I do requires more horsepower and specific software. But I got my Mom on a Chromebox and it's been the best change because it just always works. She reboots it maybe once a month and that's it.

I also work with a fleet of 60 Chromebooks for work for a specific task, and again, they are great. Some of them are going on 6 years old, hitting end-of-life in terms of support, but still chugging along like they did on day one. Never had one go bad (other than physical damage).

Of course, your mileage may vary. If you're tied to MS Office apps, you're going to have a bad time.

I've had my fair share of problems with Windows computers, especially inexpensive ones. But hey, the same can be said about pretty much any technology!

Peterr - What models have you been looking at? Any ones rising to the top for you so far?
 
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Old 07-02-21, 05:00 PM
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If it were me, and I were happy with the Chromebook the way it performs at this time, I would not worry and just continue to use the Chromebook after the termination of support. I would buy an external drive (not expensive today given the size appropriate for Chromebook use) and make sure I dumped my important files out to the drive on a regular basis. I would not rely on the “cloud” - now or then.

But - I know some people don't feel comfortable when support vanishes.

Well - I just realized that if the Chromebook apps do a lot of auto-update to the cloud, then maybe switching to a manual backup to an external drive may take all the pleasure out of using the Chromebook. Still though, something to think about.
 

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Old 08-12-21, 12:02 PM
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Just keep using it. If Google stops supporting it,
A) flash it to the free Cloud-Ready OS and continue using it.
B) flash it to Windows-10 and continue using it.

I've been quite happy running Chromium OS clone 'Cloud Ready OS' on old Win-XP era hardware for years.
#1 Samsung NC10 netbook, 32-bit Atom processor 2GB ram, 120GB SSD drive,
#2 HP Mini 210-2000, with basically the same specifications but 64 bit.
They boot, they run. I found Chromium OS was quite convenient to create accounts for every family android phone / google account; that way no matter how somebody locked themselves out of their phone account, you could always recover by logging in via the Chromebook.
Of course, Chromium / Cloud Ready were NOT really fast on such old hardware, but sufficient for web browsing, email, reading documents, composing documents.

However, about 1 year ago, the newer, faster, lighter version of Win10 came out, and I actually switched both netbooks back to Win10, I found they are great "take along" computers, take outside to read on the patio or by the pool (where the new phones / computers are NOT allowed) or to take along when I know I'm going to be waiting, e.g. taking somebody to a doctor's appointment or picking up somebody from the train station.

Although they're so old, they're also surprisingly resilient. I especially like the HP mini, because it's a no-tool disassembly. Slide the battery out, one click takes off the backshell, and swap out the SATA drive. Great trick to have when troubleshooting another computer.

Finally, they netbooks are set to automatically shut off after 10 minutes- comes in handy, as I'd left one outside on the patio while running errands, it was doused by a random thunderstorm, my wife was awe-struck that I could just shake the water out, pop off the backshell and let it dry in the sun, the running just like always after about 20 minutes.
 
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Old 08-12-21, 12:16 PM
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Chromebook

Thank you all for your comments I did settle on a Google chrome book 16 GB RAM and SSD etc.
incidentally Chromebook‘s in context for those who are less skilled and have few dollars are the right tool for the right job. I have both windows 10 on my home built computer iAsus Z390 and my MacBook Pro. The MacBook outperforms them all but it has its purpose as does the chrome book so I do not consider any of them junk; just a matter of context.
Thank you all for your positive contributions.
 
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