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battery


darrell McCoy's Avatar
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10-04-01, 05:11 AM   #1  
darrell McCoy
Need to change the battery in computer. Any pointers or advice before I attempt this project?
Thanks.

 
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10-04-01, 05:58 AM   #2  
1. If its not rechargable replace it.

why do you need to recharge it? is it one of those stubby round ones soldered onto the mobo? Cmos botteries are cheap you can get at any store that carries watch/camera batteries.

If it is soldered, I would remove it, being carefull to use a low watt soldering iron, and go to a radioshack type store and get a battery holder so you can easily replace the battery when it goes dead on you again.

Brian

ps. *slaps self silly* and then I wipe the bolder sized sleepies from my eyes and notice that the word charge is actualy change. hehehe.

depending how often you shock yourself on door knobs and such get a grounding strap, you can get them for about $5 other then that just besure you dont break the battery holder when changing out the battery. thats about it, there aint much to replacing the battery.
G'luck

Brian

 
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10-04-01, 06:32 AM   #3  
darrell McCoy
Thanks Brian: I have access to a ground strap. Just didnt want to get into a major project.

 
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10-06-01, 04:22 AM   #4  
bigmike
STOP

You have to do this while the computer is running. Why do you want to change the battery? In all my years working on this stuff I have Never had to change a battery. If you pull that battery while the computer is off you will reset the BIOS and possibly have to format. Not saying you will, usualy u just have to go into the BIOS and reselct ur drive type etc. These battery's last for many years, I have seen MB's that are 10 years old and the battery's are supplying enough to maintain the BIOS.

 
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10-06-01, 04:37 PM   #5  
Marshall Buttrey
Darrell,

Just replace the battery. I HAVE seen battery problems. It is the only problem where I had to take the PC to a shop to find out what caused the problem.

The difficulty comes because the battery can no longer support retention of the bios. In older computers, the configuration of the hard drive is not retained in the bios, and the PC cannot boot (IPL).

Marshall Buttrey

 
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10-07-01, 03:26 AM   #6  
bigmike
Battery

Well Marshal in 26 years of electronics repair including chief engineer of two AM/FM rafio stations all running computer systems I think I have a grasp of the workings of computers. And drive info is stored in the BIOS. Heads, cylinders etc are saved there. If you reset the BIOS it used to be u had to go in and reset your configuration. In todays newer boards most likley the BIOS will auto recognize the drive etc and come right back up. But if it doesnt u end up with a dead drive until you can get it's BIOS settings and manualy load them. You can flash a BIOS and trash it just as easy! I have given bad news to numerous customer that their MB it trash because they used the wrong BIOS flash. I too have seen battery problems but only in the most older systems that didn't have accsess to Lithium ion or even Ni-cad batteries. I have seen packs that have 4 AA carbon cells in them but even then a configuration like that lasts for many years. Lithium and Ni-cads will and do last for 10 years or more if not allowed to lay dormant for great lengths of time. Ni-cads will not develop a "Memory" if kept charged. The biggest killer of Ni-cads is to allow them to fully discharge and a cell or more reverses polarity. The so called memory, per a Sony technical course I was required to attend is nothing more than a crystaline growth on the plates of the battery and can be corrected by a 24 to 36 volt surge across the plates. But this is an iffy repair to say the least as explosions can occur if not properly done. Anyway, Darrle, if you are experinceing problems with the BIOS having to search for the drives etc when it boots then more than likley the battery needs replaced. If not leave it alone. And if u do change it, ground yourself to the chasis and replace it hot so u don't have to reset everything.

 
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10-07-01, 04:09 AM   #7  
Marshall Buttrey
bigmike,

Thanks for the lecture. I never questioned your knowledge or experience. If you read my previous response, I did talk about "older" PCs.

By the way, my experience in the electronic industry is just uner 38 years, including repairing and teaching "big iron".

 
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10-07-01, 06:14 AM   #8  
bigmike
Sorry

Sorry that was a little bit of a lecture eh? Changed jobs and just had to "Prove" who I was for the last ten years etc. Kinda rolled over a bit. But you have to say that if u pull the CMOS battery with the unit cold that it is going to reset the BIOS. I have done many a CMOS reset that way. Experiments would go a little too far to the point of oh well, reset, format and start over. Our labs were do it then fix it. Go ahead and push "Any Key" and see what happens Really man, didn't mean to get preachy! Mike...

 
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10-07-01, 06:48 AM   #9  
Marshall Buttrey
Not a problem bigmike. We all now have a bit bigger problem to worry about.

It's still fun (and informative) to have these virtual conversations. As a last resort only, I would hit any key and see what happened. (There were times when the fastest way to fix something was to short the fuse and see what burned.) That's a bit extreme with today's dense (expensive) technology and when it's your own money.

To continue the previous discussion: If the battery is bad (in an old PC) the BIOS is already reset. Thus there is no harm in removing the battery when the power is off.

Enjoy

Marshall Buttrey

 
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10-07-01, 11:10 PM   #10  
Besides if the PC refuses to boot because of a dead battery it doesn't matter. The bios is already reset to factory defaults. And you will have to restore your bois. Remember a bit of advice from dkerr....write down any information you may need some time down the road. Unless you dont mind playing with your system, or your like me, too damn lazy or end up loosing the info anyhow and find some morbid enjoyment from fighting for days with your system to get it back up and running.

Later

Brian

 
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