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Adjusting monitor color


abNORMal's Avatar
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03-04-02, 08:27 AM   #1  
Adjusting monitor color

I have a Dell M781S 17 inch monitor, only a couple of years old. It has developed a greenish color that I can't correct thru Control Panel/display. I'm pretty sure it's a hardware problem. I have a Radeon All in Wonder video card with TV-out. The color looks fine on the TV. When I try to correct the monitor color, the TV gets worse.

Has anyone tried adjusting the color from inside the monitor? I know there's high voltage there and to be careful. I took off the cover and looked around, but don't see anything obvious.

 
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03-04-02, 10:48 AM   #2  
bluecanary25
Have you tried to degauss the monitor?
Most monitors have an icon resembles 'A' except crossline is at angle, this is the degauss function. Give it a try; cheap and safe. Do not recommend playing inside monitor cover.

On some monitors, can also change tempature settings (do write down your inital settings before changing).

Bluecanary25

 
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03-04-02, 11:31 AM   #3  
Yeah, tried degaussing. No change. No color temperature settings outside of Windows.
The colors get really neat when you turn the monitor on its side or upside down, tho'.

 
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03-04-02, 01:12 PM   #4  
Sounds like you need to try a serious deguassing coil. You may have to take it to a TV repair shop for that. The only other thing is to check you plug to see if maybe the red pin is bent or damaged. (Check to the manual to see which is the red pin.) The only other thing is that your monitor maybe going bad due to a lack of red. This can be caused by control circuits. However, my bet is on deguassing with an external coil.

 
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03-04-02, 07:28 PM   #5  
bluecanary25
I realize this forum is to help oneanother and maybe save some money while sharing knowledge........ but sometimes, ya gotta bite the bullet.
If there is not an affordable TV shop closeby for heavy duty degaussing, it may be time to buy a replacement.
Thankfully prices are so much cheaper!!!!

Bluecanary25

 
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03-06-02, 07:02 AM   #6  
bigmike
Guns

Your green gun is going down. There is no consumer repair for this type of problem. Adjusting the guns takes thousands of dollars worth of equipment and most important knowledge. You stick a tool in the wrong place in the monitor and we will be reading about you in the Darwin Awards column. Almost all monitors come with a three to five year warranty. Did you buy this new with a system or do you know the people who did that you can get the warranty card from? Since this type of failure actually requires the CRT to be replaced you will most likely end up with a new monitor and a new warranty. Everyone please, if you don’t know how to discharge caps, or the CRT, DO NOT mess with it! I have been in electronics for almost half my life and “I” am even respectful of TV. There are voltages in the vertical and horizontal sections of that monitor or any TV that will absolutely set you right on your behind if you get across them. Even the audio section has enough voltage to burn you! If you have a weak heart etc it could even kill you. I have seen experienced techs get complacent and wake up on the floor wondering what happened. So, this rant being said, call Dell. Tell them it was a gift if nothing else and get you a new monitor. Of course say nothing about cracking the case on the unit, they will void the warranty. If you must, mention a tech at a service center opened it and then advised you seek warranty repair. Just a quick idea of voltages present, minimum of 30,000 volts at the Anode of the picture tube. (The rubber cap on the side if the CRT.) Horizontal, vertical and audio sections run in the vicinity of 600 volts or more. Take a defibulator machine at the hospital. It only uses about 200 to 300 volts to bring someone’s heart back on line. Think about what 30,000 volts would do to you… Colonel Sanders secret recipe comes to mind.

 
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03-08-02, 04:05 AM   #7  
Well I did bite the bullet and got a new monitor. Looks great.

Mike:

I had no idea monitor warranties were that long. I'll try to get Dell to replace it. I can use it on another machine I have which is now using a 15 inch.

Thanks guys.

 
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