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Home Recording Studio


northgardengal's Avatar
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03-20-02, 10:32 AM   #1  
northgardengal
Home Recording Studio

Hi everyone!

I am considering upgrading my Voyetra Audio Station 2 to expand on home recording capabilities. I want to be able to record from a tape deck and turntable as well as record live music here in my home.

It looks as if the Audio Station 2 I have, along with my Sound Blaster have some basic capabilities already available. But, looking at the back of the computer, where the speakers (2 desktop with separate woofer (Boston Acoustics) and microphone all hook up, there are two 9-pin jacks, labeled A and B. Could these be for a tape deck input or something like that?

More questions: Does anyone have any experience with the more advanced software for all types of recording? Wjich ones? What sound cards are best? Any assistance you alll can offer would be great.

My system is a Gateway Pentium II/450, 10 gig HD, Windows 98. The system is about 3 and half years old now, and equipped with a CD/DVD, as well as a HP CD-Recorder

Can anyone help me? Am I too needy???

Thanks in advance,

North Garden Gal

 
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03-20-02, 12:19 PM   #2  
bigmike
Midi

Those two 9 pin ports are DB9s and are used for joysticks and MIDI inputs. Look in the manual for further instructions. There are all kinds of MIDI devices out here you will have to pick and choose. I am not a musician so have no idea what is out here for that purpose. I will assume you have a Sound Blaster LIVE right? It is MIDI compliant so get the owners manual out and it will give you several idea or go to the SB Live site.


Last edited by bigmike; 03-20-02 at 05:10 PM.
 
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03-20-02, 12:53 PM   #3  
northgardengal
Hi Big Mike!

Thanks for responding. I've been digging through my paperwork to find the manuals - just moved here a few months ago and still have unpacked boxes....

So, from what you've said, it sounds like I have some of the capabilities I was hoping for.

I appreciate your help.

North Garden Gal

 
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03-20-02, 08:55 PM   #4  
It all depends on how good of audio you want. The SB sound cards usually suppot 16 bit audio and the current studio standard is 24 bit. If you looking for the best then that would be digidesign. Good editing software includes Cool Edit, Sound Forge, and Acid. One other thing to look at, Sound Blaster has a new system out that includes both a sound card and a breakout panel for both analog and digial i/o. Looks real cool and it supports 24 bit all the way up to 96khz.

http://www.proaudioreview.com/

 
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03-21-02, 07:21 AM   #5  
northgardengal
Hi there Michael,

Thank you very, very much for your help. I doubt that I can afford the quality of Digidesign - I checked them out and realized immediately they are way out of my league in more ways than just pricing!

What I have now is an SB-PCI64, not "Live!". I looked at the Extigy (I think that was the Sound Blaster product you were referring to?) and then looked at the Audigy EX. I printed out information on both to get a handle on which is more suitable for our purposes. I will likely upgrade the sound card and then look at additional software for editing, looking at the products you mentioned.

I am still unclear as to which of these sound cards will also be the best at recording music from an external source, like a tape deck or turntable, to my CD-R Drive. Any thoughts on that?

Again, thanks for your time.

North Garden Gal
aka Elizabeth

 
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03-21-02, 06:39 PM   #6  
For basic recording a good Sound Blaster Card works just fine. All you would need for your tape deck is a 1/8" stereo to dual RCA adapter cable which you can get at any Radio Shack. The only problem you could run into on the turntable is if the only output it has is phono level. (It should stay phono if it is.) In this case you will need to get a phono preamp or run it though an amp that has phono inputs. The turntable signal is too weak for a sound card which is expecting line level for the audio in and the signal is to hot for the mic level input.

The better sound cards have outboard devices with appropriate connectors. These devices connect to the sound card via a cable that is similar to a printer cable. The advantage to this is that plugging directly into the back of a computer can cause a low level ground hum in your audio recording. (The same ground hum that can mess up channel 2 on your TV.)

 
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03-22-02, 06:38 AM   #7  
northgardengal
Michael - You're a God send!

What you've told me so far is in plain English and I actually think I am beginning to understand this stuff. Not sure about the turntable, now that you mention it, but I can check to see what in the world it is.

May I reserve the right to pester you some more should there be further questions? Meanwhile, I have some work to do.....

You've been a real help.

Elizabeth

 
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