stack pages

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  #1  
Old 05-03-02, 04:24 PM
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stack pages

I had address book open and the screen went blue with the following message. " There are no spare stack pages. It may be necessary to increase the settings of 'MinSPs' in SYSTEM. INI to prevent possible stack faults. There are currently 5 SPs allocated. Anybody know what this means. All greek to me.
Thanks
Bill
 
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  #2  
Old 05-03-02, 08:57 PM
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A stack page is memory allocated for temporary storage. It's used by the "OS" -> Windows. For example, swap file transactions (to or from physical memory).

Choices:
[System is obese] Increase MinSPs= [typically multiples of 4 (4, 8, 16)].
[System is overweight] Run fewer processes (from the moment Windows loads - including start menu programs).
[Cut fat & cholesterol - Bigmikes standing advice] - delete the swap file in DOS and/or use a static swap file size allocated on its own disk volume, delete temporary internet files, cookies, [onward to] old email, and all of the other Windows fluff of instant availability. Defrag, backup & remove old files....

All of the former. Lean heatlhy machines don't blue screen. Fat and/or sick ones do.
 
  #3  
Old 05-03-02, 09:55 PM
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stack files

Not being too computer literate most of what you told me went right over my head. The only thing I know how to do is get rid of the temporary internet files. The rest of what you said is a mystery to me. I appreciate yur advice but I just don't know how to do what your telling me. Simple to you, complex to me.
Thanks
Bill
 
  #4  
Old 05-03-02, 10:58 PM
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The memory allocation for the swap file memory...where is that? Is that in the system properties/performance tab/virtual memory button/then checking specify own settings? I couldn't find anything in the system.ini by going through msconfig.

isetheby
In reference to 2000 and the second recommendation: to keep what is running the background, even though you're not using it is done in one of two ways (that I know of). If you will look in the bottom right hand corner of your screen you will see some icons next to your clock. All of these programs are loaded and ready to run when you click on them. If you're not using them, then try right clicking on them to see if you can disable them from the taskbar. If not, then try opening the progs that you don't use all the time from there, and see if you have the option to discontinue "start when Windows starts". Unclick that option. If that isn't possible, the you can do it through start button (bottom left on screen)/run/type 'msconfig' and then the enter key. When the system configuration utility screen opens, you can click on the tab labeled startup. Listed are all the progs that windows loads up automatically. Be cautious of what you uncheck, windows does need some of these progs, but most can be unchecked and windows will load these things only when it needs it to run a program you've told it to run. Personally, I have unchecked them all and been fine, but its a pain to have to manually load my firewall and virus protection every boot up. In otherwords, if you're not sure, then try leaving it. It will slow some programs down in their loading, but performance afterwards shouldn't change. Make sure that you have you a bootable disk handy in case windows can't reboot. If it causes problems after you have unchecked something (reboot problems) then use your boot disk to go back to msconfig to recheck the boxes that you think may have caused the problem.

In reference to the last recommendation: start button/programs/accessories/system tools/disk cleanup. That will show you have large the files are in those places, and gives you the option (checking the box) to empty those files.

Hope this helps, and also, 2000 & Big Mike might have better directions on the minimizing start up items.

Kay
 
  #5  
Old 05-04-02, 11:34 PM
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Kaybird, to clarify: (for example....) was a sample use of stack pages. Stack pages are NOT specific to swap file transactions alone nor are they the same thing as Virtual Memory [hard disk space made to act as if it were memory].

System properties, performance tab, virtual memory button, specify own settings, is one means of allocating fixed disk space for Virtual Memory [swap file size]. [Generally applet entries modify the registry]. For Win9x both size and/or location may be specified within System.ini also.

Being a command line user in control of your own destiny you will create a backup Directory [folder is a Windows thing] such as (Me-undos, Oopsies, or Cry-baby); copy the current version of system.ini to it (using a preconceived renaming convention); then set the file attributes as read only before making changes.

md c:\cry-baby
copy c:\windows\system.ini c:\cry-baby\system.in0
attrib +r c:\cry-baby\system.in0

If you err you will use a boot disk; then delete the current version of system.ini, and replace it with the
backed up version.

del c:\windows\system.ini
copy c:\cry-baby\system.in0 c:\windows\system.ini

You're ready to edit (almost).

edit c:\windows\system.ini

Under the section heading [386Enh] you may add either or both:
MaxPagingFileSize=[replace with size in kilobytes]
PagingFile=[replace with location]

If location is specified alone: Windows moves the swap file to the specified fixed disk and/or directory. Do not specify a non fixed disk, because your entry is not overseen. If size is specified alone: the swap file is limited to that size. If size is too small expect problems... including a hard system crash.

PagingFile=[location] Include Upper Case drive letter of the fixed hard disk F: Include Upper Case Directory Path if applicable F:\SWAPFILE Include Upper Case swap file name F:\SWAPFILE\WIN386.SWP OR F:\WIN386.SWP if using the entire disk or the Root Directory.

You may, at will, change the location of the swap file on the same disk for the sole purpose of deleting the old swap file. Afterward the location may be changed to its former value - "remove the entire entry" for the default location of C:\WINDOWS. [Reboot to make the changes properly]. [Does this sound like a batch process or what].

MaxPagingFileSize=[kilobytes] This value is estimated based on the entire system plus running tasks and programs. If the estimate is 50Megs then: 1024 * 50 = 51200 MaxPagingFileSize=51200
50 Megs may be suitable for one system and cause problems on another. Too little - problems. Too much - wasted disk space. Monitoring the swap file size for a period of time before making changes
is a REAL GOOD IDEA.

dir c:\windows\win386.swp >>c:\cry-baby\swap.log
[using system monitor is another option].

Windows manages the swap file size or "virtual memory" dynamically. Changing that is an elective choice. [Are you sure? > Are you in control? > Do you know what you're doing? My favorite would be: "Hands off!... Up against the wall and spread em'". Trouble is MS is too kind (sometimes)].


Stack page (if interested):

A stack is a reserved area of memory for (if you will) piling or stacking data. Different types of stacks can be defined (a programs stack, the system stack, a TCP/IP stack, a stack page). For some types of stacks the system memory where the stack existed is reclaimed when the stack is no longer needed, and for other types the assignment is permanent for the session.

The same reserved area of system memory is reused over and over. Stored values or data can and do change. Paging is the process of transferring data to or from physical memory. Thus stack pages are reserved for moving data to or from physical memory.

Since memory to disk transfers are slower than memory to memory transfers in some instances it makes sense to transfer valves to or from a working program to an intermediary memory location [a stack page] and then finally to or from disk [for example, the swap file]. That is one instance where stack pages might be used.

On fat, dumb, and happy systems (low disk space or slower disks and low system memory in relationship to running tasks and their memory requirements) use of stack pages is reasonable. Omitted: the possibly that one or more programs require stack pages for paging transitions. [My view: those 32 bit snot wad behemoth programs would receive the axe quickly]. [I'll take two of those 25 million byte wis bang programs... no, make that three]. [Mine's better than your's].

Didn't find MinSPs= under the section heading [386Enh] in system.ini? Well then they ain't necessary. Maybe you're running a lean system or haven't encountered a behemoth monstrosity yet.

I would further detail what to do when you receive an explicit error message in conjunction with a system crash but I had better not. [It will be a frying pan across my skull for sure, and permanent banishment form the Internet].

Bigmike, please save me. Tell him what to do.

Signing off... Over and out.
2000
 
  #6  
Old 05-05-02, 07:59 AM
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2000

Didn't mean to take up your whole night on this. Thank you so much. I haven't used a dos machine since 1996 (a 386), and it is so true that you lose what you don't use. When you were describing the batch file (potential one) then all the swap file stuff started coming back to me.

I try to keep my machine as lean as possible, especially since it's a Yugo (EMachine) and only has 256M of memory. I also follow the directions that you and BigMike give me on how to keep the fat out, and try to keep it as lean as possible. I love the batch file you gave me on how to get rid of the "other" cookies and temp files.

I realize now that I was in Windows looking at the 386Enh and it had a + by it, but wouldn't show me what the information when I clicked the plus sign. My settings at the time were for it to show all files. Anyway, guess I could see it under dos mode.

Thanks again for your help.

Kay
 
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