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slightly advanced networking


green jacket's Avatar
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Join Date: Sep 2000
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06-03-02, 04:57 PM   #1  
slightly advanced networking

I have been comptemplating changing my network hardware configurations, mainly to create more locations to plug in laptops.
I currently have a linksys router, that does not have enough ports for as many locations arround the house as I physically have. (not all of the hard wiring is usable do to this dilema).
My thought is to add an additional switch with as many ports as I would like (say an 8 port Netgear fast ethernet switch (I saw a good sale price)) to the setup. I have not had any success trying to find information on the web about this. Cound someone(s) explain what to do accurately?
Specifically,
1. Where do I connect the cable from the uplink port on the new switch to on the router/switch? one of the regular ports?
2. Will the machines connected to the new switch be able communicate normally with those connected to the switch inside the router?

3. How involved are the settings changes for either piece of equipment? Is this realitivley easy?
I have a cheapskate neighbor which I going to install a network for, I may use the same setup. He is dreaming of sharing a dialup connection through his main machine. I think he is nuts, and will find that will not work out at all. Therefore no need for a router yet. I have repeated cable and dsl many times to him.
gj

 
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06-04-02, 09:51 AM   #2  
bigmike
Router

Well your on the right track but if your going to spend the money on a switch why not just buy an 8 port router? I didn’t price them but why add and extra component to take care of? I'm just lazy but if I only have a single router feeding the three computers here I don’t need a switch, hub etc… K.I.S.S.

 
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06-04-02, 08:04 PM   #3  
It used to be easy, router to router or hub to hub or router to hub was a crossover cable. Then to make it easy??? manufacutures started usinguplink ports. Hence you can go from a port on one the main switch, router, or hub to the uplink port on a switch or hub with a standard Cat5. But guess what, if you go from an uplink port to an uplink port you need a ... crossover cable.

Basically, if you are going between two network devices you need some form of crossover. This can be a crossover cable or an uplink port. However, you can't have two crossovers because that takes you back to where you started.

Is any of this clear. It still makes my head hurt.

 
green jacket's Avatar
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06-04-02, 09:00 PM   #4  
I have the router already, which is not going to be replaced.
The new switch would then be connected from its uplink to a regular port on the router(8 port) with a croosover cable. I know all about the actual wiring of cabling etc, no need to to explain that to me. (I install home networks on the side).
I wil try this sometime soon, perhaps in several weeks.
Thank you.

gj

 
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06-05-02, 05:28 AM   #5  
jpeskoff
If connectivity with your laptop is what you want, the easiest way is to go wireless. For this, you will need a wireless access point which will be conncected to your network with an RJ-45 cable and a wireless network card in the laptop. This way, you don't need to wire the house anymore and you can roam around (even in the backyard) and still be connected.

I've done this and it's great sitting in the backyard on a lounge chair surfing the Internet.

 
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06-05-02, 07:12 AM   #6  
It's very easy to add another hub or router. All you need to do is free up one port on the router, connect a Cat5 cable from the port to a port on the switch or hub (if the hub or switch doesn't have an uplink port then you'll need to use a crossover cable). Then simply plug your computers into the hub or switch. That's all there is, the router will never know the difference. Of course, a switch is better then a hub, and 100 is better then 10. When you stack them, try to put the router on top, it gets pretty hot (especially Lynksys).

 
green jacket's Avatar
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06-05-02, 02:14 PM   #7  
I know, the linksys router does get hot. My question has ben answered, and wireless is not ans option. (Security/proximity to neighbors).
Thank You,
gj

 
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