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Partitions


kaybyrd's Avatar
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06-28-02, 02:57 AM   #1  
Partitions

Just a quick, probably not easy tho, question:

I have a tendency to download shareware to try it before I buy it. What affect does this have on my computer by installing, trying and then deleting? I know that I probably need a good uninstaller because I probably have a lot of things on here that didn't get deleted/uninstalled.

My question is more about partitioning a drive. If I partition my drive and do all that stuff in one partition, can I clean that up easier? I don't truly understand partitioning or my hard drive having more than one letter assigned to it. Is there anyway to explain this to me in the K*I*S*S format? Am still way too novice to do some of these things, however I am also too novice to try to deal with the problems I cause myself on this machine.

My resolution: reformat. There has got to be a more sensible way to get back on track on this thing.

-Kay

 
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06-28-02, 05:39 PM   #2  
KISS partitions: draw a large circle. Using the same center circumscribe two smaller circles within the first. Each inner circle circumference is an electronic partition boundary. This is not an exact rendition, but it's close enough.

The primary or bootable partition (where the boot tracks are) is the outer most division starting at the edge of the disk. It is established first. Since the primary partition is the outermost division only one primary partition may exist per physical drive.

The two innermost circular divisions will become logical drives. But first, the area from the first inter circular division to the center must be created as an extended partition. After an extended partition is created, it may be partitioned into smaller logical drives or a single logical drive may be created. Partitions are created: primary, extended, logical. The extended partition 'reserves' disk space for creating one or more logical drives.

More detail....
Ignoring multi-boot loaders: if one physical drive exists, and if an OS is to be installed on it, the primary partition (drive c is set "active" or bootable after creation. If two or more physical drives exist one of the primary partitions on either disk is set active (drive c: or drive d. Only one primary active or bootable partition per machine .

Why only one bootable primary partition per machine: two or more active partitions are illogical.

The BIOS searches the boot tracks of enabled bootable drives for the boot loader routine. [Enabled drives and the search order are established in CMOS setup and the parameters are stored in CMOS memory]. [The boot loader routine is created when a primary partition is created with FDISK or a similar utility]. [Bootable CDs are a special case]. The boot routine knows the location of the OS boot files. [Any OS, not just Windows]. If two active partitions were found in CMOS parameters the BIOS would be forced to choose the correct one, according to your desires. Thus a choice is illogical.

Creating multiple partitions for managing windows executables helps, and it doesn't. It helps, because many of the programs files are segmented from c: [boot drive] making them more easily found, and then deleted. It doesn't help, because during a Windows application program installation files are added to c:, (a default action). and other files on c: are modified.

To uninstall manually you need to learn how your version of Windows operates, and then how to use another OS to adjust its head space. Using Windows to adjust Windows is just too funny, so I won't comment further.

 
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06-28-02, 08:22 PM   #3  
different o/s

Okay, all that made sense. Now another question: how many different OS's are there for a PC? I know of DOS, Windows 3.x, 98, 98SE, ME and XP. I currently run 98SE and am afraid to change. I don't have a totally outdated machine, however it is very close to it.

-Kay

 
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06-29-02, 10:05 AM   #4  
Windows, UNIX and UNIX like distributions, and DOS, are lumped categories of the most often used PC OSes. If individual PC OSes were counted [to include current OS projects, orphan OSes, and older PC OSes], the number of PC OSes would be significant.

Outdated or Jonesing. Jonesing is "the game". Outdated hardware/software ceases to serve your needs.

 
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06-29-02, 11:03 AM   #5  
When I got my first computer (286) I ran everything DOS. I tried to install Windows 3.? on it, but it just couldn't handle it. I did, however, run a program called GeoWorks. It was similar. Is that the same type deal? It was still DOS dependent, and I believe (please correct me if I'm wrong) that Windows was DOS dependent at that time, too.

UNIX is something I've heard, but wasn't sure what it was. I will check into it. I doubt that I will ever venture from my 98SE since I'm not sure what I'm doing to begin with, but....I just did something really stupid yesterday out of anger/frustration. I purchased 200MB of website space and a domain name. Now I have to figure out what the heck to do with it, and I may need to become more computer smart to use it. Unfortunately for you guys, I will probably be begging off help here in the forums.

Someone here in the forums explained to me why to have more than one OS on your system. Makes wonderful sense to me now. Too bad the only way I know to explain it to my family is comparing it to the PlayStation, and PS2. The way that one will play things designed for it, the next will play only things designed for it, plus previous PS1 games (poorly) and then also has extra things that it can do. That's what sparked my curiosity in maybe having more than one "drive" on my hard drive to keep the bull from the stuff I use all the time. Probably on my system a second physical drive would be more practical. I have a Pentium II, and only 4gig hard drive. I don't fill it up, thanks to 2000 showing me how to delete the hidden index.dat files, and reminding of the importance of 'taking out the trash' on the system. If I am going to learn learn to build website, and use the different programming tools, a better machine with the ability to handle LOTS more memory than the 256M that is max with this machine needs to be higher.

Building a machine seems the most logical to me, I have a nice tower which is way ahead of what's inside of it since I burned up the fuse in the power supply and instead of spending $50 for eMachines to send me another crappy power supply, I purchased a nice case w/ power supply and swapped everything over.

Okay, now that I've sparked 15 million more questions I will go ahead and close...

-Kay

 
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