Fastening deck boards??


  #1  
Old 07-28-02, 07:45 PM
trarnold
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Fastening deck boards??

I spoke with a person that was using construction adhesive and 2 1/2" screws to put down 5/4 deck boards. Has anyone else down this? Would it not make board replacement tough in the future?
 
  #2  
Old 07-29-02, 03:29 AM
fewalt's Avatar
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trarnold,

The adhesive would be over-kill. The boards could be pryed up though in the future.

fred
 
  #3  
Old 08-04-02, 08:31 PM
josh1
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The adhesive is a good idea for T&G plywood subflooring so you dont get squeaks but 5/4 with 2 screws in it isnt going anywhere.

Hope this helps--Josh
 
  #4  
Old 08-16-02, 06:21 AM
D
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squeaky deck boards

I finished installing my deck late last year, and much of the deck squeaks as I walk across it. Main deck is 30' X 16', joists spaced 16" on center, 5/4X6 Pressure Treated SYP installed on a 45 (diaganal). I used 3" square head deck screws, 2 per board at each joist loacation. I have not sealed/stained the deck yet. I actually have one more set of stair rail to install, then I will pressure wash and stain the deck.

Does the squeaking have anything to do with the deck not being sealed/stained yet? Alot of the boards did shrink, and I am getting some cupping. Early this summer I tightened down all the deck screws. This took out ALL of the squeak, but it is back again. Are my deck boards just coming loose?

Also, I had about 4 or 5 screw heads snap off (just from the stress of a warped deck board). What's the best way to fix this? Should I attempt to drill out the old screw? I was leaning toward using the same screw hole, but going in on a slight angle as to not hit the broken screw burried in the joist. Or should I drill a new hole and fill the old hole with wood putty before staining?

Thanks!!!

Dave
 
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Old 08-16-02, 06:52 AM
RickG
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Exclamation

Howdy, I just stained my deck that I built last year. All wood was sealed with Wolman Raincoat before being built. This year my wife and I sanded (floor sander with 80 grit) the entire deck top and then used Cuprinol stain with BRUSHES. (all 1400 sq. ft.) (don't use a roller!!) Definatly make sure you sand level before you stain or you'll always be catching water. You probable wont have to pressure wash.

Some of your squeaks are probably coming from the movement due to drying out of the decking, but you might want to look at the connection between your joists and the beams. Movement here will definatly squeek if there is a nail or screw not holding well.

Hope it helps.
 
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Old 08-16-02, 07:12 AM
D
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Rick,

Thanks for your help!

The decking I used was "Thompsonized" when I bought it, however, MOST of it has warn off. I was told to pressure wash to remove what's left of the thompson's (Inferior product) before staining. I guess I could sand instead, but was told powerwashing would be just as good to remove all dead wood fibers.

Decking IS really dry, but the joists should still be attached securely to the beams (I will double check) since I used hurricane ties AND toe-nailed at the middle and outer beam.

I plan on using Cabot semi-transparent deck stain. I have been bouncing between Cabot, Olympic, Cuprinol and Penofin (twice the price of Cabot) and decided to go with Cabot. I think ANY of the above should be fine.

I WILL be brushing on the stain, probably with a big wide brush and extension. Do they make special brushes for this type of application? I would like to apply with the ease of rolling, but using a brush.

When I installed decking, I used 10d nails as spacers, leaving tiny holes in all the joists. Do these need to be coated with stain, or will the brushing action find its way down between the deck boards to the joist? Do you recommend staining the structure underneath (beams/joists/posts) for extended life?

Thanks Again.

Dave
 
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Old 08-16-02, 07:43 AM
RickG
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I used a 4 inch brush with a 2 inch finishing one for trim (we have two colors).

I think you should have enough stain going through to the nail holes since you should make sure all of your screw heads are soaked good and that is close to your joists. Make sure you brush it out good and don't over do it and put in on thick. Else you will be looking at brushmarks and blotches and using expletives a lot. DO NOT USE A ROLLER! DON'T USE SOLID COLOR STAIN ON DECKING, ONLY ON VERTICAL PIECES LIKE BALLUSTERS AND POSTS (too much pigment, might as well use paint)

The stuff underneath is already coated (as is mine) and the sun doesn't get at it but I do plan to brush on something underneath next year. Mine is 14 ft off the ground so I was going to use semi-transparent with a bit of white tint (kind of a whitewash effect to make it lighter under the deck. Ples it will protect it when it rains for several days and the water hans below the boards. What the hack we all have nothing but time on our hands right :-)
 
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Old 08-17-02, 11:38 PM
josh1
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you cant beat Cuprinol for decks. i use it on cedar shake roofs. lasts and lasts. -Josh
 
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Old 08-18-02, 04:28 AM
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DAVE,
Your Thomsonized pt wood means it was pressure treated then covered with the inferior Thompson sealer.
First, you need to do a water test on the surface. If the water beads at all it needs to be stripped off. If it isn't stripped it may repel any good stain. It is not necessary to sand. Sanding can remove the protective coating on all the nail/screw heads. A stripping and pressure washer accomplishes the same thing as sanding by removing the selaer and outer layer of dead grey wood fibers. I only lightly hand sand areas(benches and hand rails) where the PW may raise the grain and develop 'fuzzies'.
As info, a stripper will contan sodium hydroxide (lye) which will remove the inferior parrafin sealer. For safety reasons read the label carefully, especially note the eye protection.
Brushing is fine, and a roller works well if enough stain is used. I roll on stain and back brush to even out any puddles. As far as the small holes in the joists - you can't normally see them. If the stain hits them fine, if it doesn't, don't worry about it. If structurally sound the deck will be there for thirty years or more. We stain decks mostly for aesthetic reasons, and think we are protecting the wood. I've done some 20 year old decks that have been totally neglected and completely weathered grey. They were still in fairly good shape. It's just that they look much nicer now.

As far as appling stain to the underneath, if it will look nicer to you then go ahead. But I doubt it will extend the life of the deck.
Water will still find it's way into the wood anyway, by wicking and any unprotected area(between deck board and joist). But as I mentioned, it will be there a long time anyway.

The top three Consumer Reports rated stains are Cabots, Sikkens and Wolmans F&P.

Fred
Deck-Kleen Powerwashing
 
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Old 08-19-02, 05:19 AM
RickG
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Sorry, I did that assume thing. Of course, if your going to sand you need to make sure all of your screww are low enough. As your sanding you may see some that you'll have to take down a bit. The reason I sanded is to get a nice flat surface that won't hold water (nicer to walk on with bare feet) as well as take off any bad wood. Sanding also removes any shiny spots on the wood that is caused by wear and by manufacturing in the mill. This open up the grain so that the stain will go in. If is't a wood like redwood that has 'natural protecton this isn't as crutial, but spruce or PT spruce doesn't have natural protection. PT wood today isn't what we used to get. (just look at the end cut and try to measure the depth of penetration) The depth of obsorption is pretty bad and I would call it closer to pre-stained than pressure treated. (even redwood gets the natural oils leached out).

So while it was originally pressure treated, the suface is is where the wear will occur so there is where you want to have a good seal to moisture and UV. Doing the bottom, to ME, is half extending the life and half aesthetics. I coated all sides of my boards BEFORE I put them together. (joists and decking) thus there isn't the "unprotected" area.

Rick
 
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Old 08-22-02, 08:02 PM
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Thanks everyone for all your help!! Still puzzled regarding the deck boards squeeking. Will they quiet down once I STAIN the deck? This would indicate that the dryness of the boards is causing twisting and squeaking, which is what I kinda thought.

Also installed MOST deck boards bark side down. OLD methodology called for bark side up, but later that was changed and was told bark side down. SOME deck boards were so bowed, that I just installed the board CUP down so that it wouldn't hold water. Deck boards are installed diagonally (45) on the joists, 16" centers, would this have anything to do with squeaking?

Thanks Again!

Dave
 
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Old 08-23-02, 03:35 AM
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Dave,

The OLD methodology is STILL correct. Brk side should be installed facing upward. The boards will then shed more water properly. If you've got two screws/nails per board - add a third fastener.

fred
 
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Old 08-23-02, 07:02 AM
RickG
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Lightbulb

I'd just like to add a caution to Fred's suggestion (no offense meant Fred).

If your decking is at 45 degrees then the two screws you have should be about 5 inched apart. (assuming they are on centerline of the joist. This way the decking shouldn't 'ROCK' which may cause some of your squeaking. (this is also about 1 1/2 inched in from the edge, measured along the centerline of your joists, which is the same as 1 inch in from the edge of your deck board) (are you following)

If your screws are closer together already then the third fastener will probably do nothing to prevent the rocking of the deck board. If they are at the outer edge of the deck board already, and you've got the bark side down, then the middle of the deck board is the contact point to the joist and it could move and cause your squeek. By putting a screw in the middle it may hold down the part of the decking thats rubbing and stop the movement and thus, the squeak.

RickG
 
 

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