Deck Screws - How Long

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Old 08-16-02, 12:26 PM
Mike C smith
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Deck Screws - How Long

I am replacing my deck boards using 5/4 rugullar pressure treated boards. I'll be screwing into the 2 inch side of the floor joist that are 16 inches apart (I think they are 2x8 or 2x10).

What length deck screw should I use?

Thanks,
 
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Old 08-16-02, 01:14 PM
RickG
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Most would probably tell you to use 2 1/2 inch, but i always go twice the member your screwing and add 1/2 inch if the reciving member will allow. That means 3" in your case. not a big increase in cost but much more solid.
 
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Old 08-16-02, 03:07 PM
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Mike,

One more suggestion.
Try to find #2 square drive galvanized screws. They rarely strip and be much less hassle.

fred
 
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Old 08-16-02, 07:20 PM
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Deck Screws - How Long

Mike C smith,

Between the 2 1/2" screws and used of square drive, galvanized -screws, you should have no problems. Use of 3" screws is overkill but to each his own but no harm in using them.

Good Luck!
 
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Old 08-19-02, 05:01 AM
RickG
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I can see where you get "overkill" from. But when building codes are developed, they seem to be just enough to get the job done and, TO ME, they lack some safety factors where I think they should be (again thats MY opinion). Just imagine building a house STRICTLY to the code with no extra "QUALITY". I can't. I would not like to be the owner paying the maintenance on that house 5 to 10 years down the road and definitly wouldn't want to live in it in the mean time. The difference in cost for 3" vs 2 1/2" screws is negligible, and since the screws is whats holding it together, the extra strength and peace of mind is well worth the extra couple of dollars a box.

But then I used 6x6 posts for my deck when 4x4 was good enough for code. I couldn't imagine the sway I would feel on the prtion of deck that's 14 ft off the ground. It's solid the way I built it.
 
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Old 09-01-02, 09:08 PM
Mike C smith
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Deck Screws

Okay everybody, Thank you for your advice. I used 3 inch galvanized Phillips Head deck screws for half my deck. I was having such a problem with stripping out the heads. I switched to the square notch galvanized screws. What a difference this made. It was 5 times easier with the square notch instead of the Phillips head. Actually I wanted the square notch in the first place but Home Depot did not cary them.

Anyway, if you ever have to put screws in a deck. By all means by the square not screws. You won't believe the difference.

Thanks everybody for your help.
 
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Old 09-01-02, 11:17 PM
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Originally posted by RickG
I can see where you get "overkill" from. But when building codes are developed, they seem to be just enough to get the job done and, TO ME, they lack some safety factors where I think they should be (again thats MY opinion). Just imagine building a house STRICTLY to the code with no extra "QUALITY". I can't. I would not like to be the owner paying the maintenance on that house 5 to 10 years down the road and definitly wouldn't want to live in it in the mean time.
Rick, unfortunately it seems to get done. My experience was summer work putting up multi-dwelling units with a commercial housing builder many years ago working my way thru school. Getting the bid's the name of the game and buying the cheapest, approved materials & supplies and using as few of them as could be used in each unit happened every day in these projects. And as for them worrying about future maintenance... the guys that were building them had contractors getting paid with our tax dollars to fix 'em up later so I'm sure shabby work equaled job security in their minds.

After a couple of months I was hired by another contractor framing houses in a subdivision, we'd put one in the dry and move to the next one. The crew and the attitude was totally different, worked hard as I ever worked trying to keep up with those guys but was really a good job for an ole country boy that knew just enough to get in trouble if you didin't watch him

That was many years ago but I drove by a house going up the other day and they were hanging vinyl siding directly to the studs. Makes me shudder to think of it.
 
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