Removing sidewalk and patio. Help!

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  #1  
Old 09-20-02, 02:24 PM
Mattmold
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Exclamation Removing sidewalk and patio. Help!

i was thinking in the spring to removing a sidewalk that goes from my driveway to the front door, then to the road. i was also thinking of removing a large patio and 2 cement porches. They have brick on the side and the top is about 3" thick. they are appx. 9x7. i recived several quotes for about $2000 - 3000 to remove everything. I have never done this before and was wondering how much work is involved. The porches are re- bared i'm almost sure, but the patio and the sidewalk dont have any re-enforcement. Should I just pay someone or do it myself. I know I can do it, but is it worth paying someone?? Any help is appreciated. Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 09-21-02, 01:54 AM
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Re: Removing sidewalk and patio. Help!

Well Matt, this may just the job you've been waiting all this time to use that bigger hammer you mention at the end of your post.

Sounds like you may want to rent a jack hammer to break up the concrete. You can usually cut the rebar and wire with the blade of the jackhammer too. And don't get the wrong impression about the jackhammer, it will speed up your job for sure but will still work your tail off. You will also need a sledgehammer and if you have a prybar long enough to get your shoulder into if needed that may come in handy. You also may have occasion to use things like cold chisel, small hand held sledge, hacksaw or sawzall and small bolt cutters or heavy gauge wire cutters.

And this ain't the place to work without eye protection, heavy leather gloves, and ear plugs. And unless you're lucky enough to have some property with a huge holler that needs filling, be sure to find out where you can dump the stuff, and the cost. It's a rough job but doable.
Dennis
PS - I left out friends. Bring lots of 'em!!!
 
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Old 09-21-02, 12:52 PM
MeffaDawg
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I think what ScrollMaster was trying to say is let someone else do this for you!

I recently had a large slab removed for me by a friend who's into demolition and such. He used a lot of heavy equipment and he almost destroyed a BobCat. But because he had all the right tools and the hired help, he was able to finish the job in a day.

You could certainly go it alone, but make sure you have a heavy duty truck to haul everything away and some friends to help you load it up. With a regular pickup you'll most likely be making a few trips to the dump.

After watching the job I had done, I was happy to be sitting on the sidelines for that one, and I hate to hire anyone for anything I think I can do myself. Some jobs you're just better off leaving for the pros.
 
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Old 09-21-02, 02:14 PM
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I've busted and moved a few concrete sidewalks, patios, pads, etc over the years working for other folks and although a lot of work I'd do it myself if I had to move one. But meffadawg is definitely right... this ain't something just everyone is gonna want to do, especially if the slab is good size. This is long, back breaking, heavy work just full of busted knucks and mashed fingers so if you're a mind to pay someone for a job this may be the one to do it.

Breaking the slab up is just the start. Separating the pieces from the rebar and wire so they can be loaded is a job in itself. And remember, you won't have the heavy equipment to load it with so the pieces will have to be broken small enough to be loaded by hand. And I'll make the point again, the jackhammer is a killer, it will cut your time down but will work you about as hard as anything I've ever used. Another point I'll make again... eye protection, heavy leather gloves, and ear plugs if using the jackhammer.

As for hauling the pieces away, I'd use a trailer if available, this stuff will beat up the inside of your truck bed quick and doesn't take many pieces to overload the springs and shocks, you will certainly have to make a bunch of loads using a pickup.

Good Luck either way and let us know how it turns out.
Dennis
 
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Old 09-21-02, 04:31 PM
Mattmold
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Thanks for your help guys. there's no mesh or rebar in the sidewalk or patio. my dad put it in...well...that's why I'm removing it. hehe! I was thinking of renting a bin to load all of the peices into. just gotta check out the prices and how big. a jackhammer is at the top of my list. i was gonna spend a few days busting it all up and then get my friends to help me toss it all into the bin. I do want to do this my self and I'm in good shape, its just I have no experience in removing cement. I still got a good Isea on what to do though. Do you think that it'll be a problem taking out the sidewalk and patio especially since it has no rebar or mesh? Maybe make my job eaiser. i hope !
 
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Old 09-21-02, 05:06 PM
MeffaDawg
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If the slab isn't reinforced, then it'll definitely be easier than if it were. For me, the toughest part of doing demolition around the house is what to do with all the crap you need to get rid of!

If you're planning on renting a dumpster to put the concrete in, I'd check to make sure it'll be able to take the load. I don't know how much rock you'll have and the size of your dumpster, but better safe than sorry. I rented one when I blasted out my kitchen, but I wasn't filling it with concrete. Like I said, probably Ok, but just double check on that. Oh, and the dumpsters can really mess up your driveway, especially if it's asphalt, best putting it in a spot that you don't really care about (if possible), otherwise put down plywood for it to rest on.

A jackhammer will make things a LOT easier. I would try to crack the slab with a sledge first. You never know, it might just break up easy and you'll be on your way. Best to start at an edge if you can.
 
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Old 09-21-02, 07:31 PM
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If it's a thin enough slab you might just make it with a sledge. Sometimes sidewalks are thin enough you can dig a bit under them, insert a pry bar and lift it up to get a space under it and it will break easier. Just don't forget that you and anyone close needs to wear goggles when that sledge or jack hammer is hitting the concrete and heavy leather gloves help with the shock of the sledge hammer or the vibration of the jackhammer and when handling the concrete.

If it's 4" or more you'll probably want the jackhammer with point or narrow chisel loaded. Use the point and start on a corner or an edge like meffadawg was talking about. Section off pieces that are manageable to pickup and load. It is easier to do this at first than taking a larger piece that is broken off and trying to break that later.

The hammer is pretty heavy, get your slight angle going in and lean into it a bit to steady it but it will do most of the the work going in and when it breaks the piece from the slab you can usually rotate the handle of the jackhammer down toward your feet which will further separate and lift the piece up so it can be handled. I'm no expert with one by no means but I've use them on occasions and this seems to be how I worked best with it doing similar jobs.
It's definitely a butt kicking job but ya can do it if you're determined ... and let us know how it goes,
Dennis

PS-Tell a bunch of your friends you are grilling hamburgers this Saturday and show up a few hours before lunch for some group activities. Now after they find out exactly what the group activity is and that the cookout part doesn't start till supper time, if you have any that didn't leave you gotta real friend.
PPS-Weigh the hammer before you start and after a few hours of vibration and picking the hammer up over and over then weigh it again and I promise you it's at least 3-4 times heavier than when you started.
 
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Old 09-23-02, 06:06 PM
Mattmold
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thanks guys! Don't worry scrollmaster, we'll all be wearing goggels. the sidewalk id about 3" I'm gonna get some meore qutoes and figre things out. I want to do it myself, as I'm sure everyone here does, but if there isn't that much difference(which I doubt) in the prce than I;ll have them do it. Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 09-24-02, 06:33 AM
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Originally posted by Mattmold
thanks guys! Don't worry scrollmaster, we'll all be wearing goggels. . Thanks for your help.
Good deal Matt. When I was 18 and a laborer we were busting a slab for removal and the guy working with me had a piece of concrete hit his eye. Had to wear a dressing for a couple of weeks but was lucky. It made my mind up about eye protection.


[i]I'm gonna get some more qutoes and figre things out. I want to do it myself, as I'm sure everyone here does, but if there isn't that much difference(which I doubt) in the prce than I;ll have them do it. [/B]
BTW, you might get someone to trade out labor for something. I added 1450 sq ft to my house couple of years ago and traded electrical labor for engraved guns; drywall tape & float & texture for Les Paul Guitar and amp; foundation finishing and painting for dentures; etc, etc. Bartering is a great way to conserve money.
 
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