Deck sloped in wrong direction...


  #1  
Old 12-04-02, 08:09 AM
Rick Krakora
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Deck sloped in wrong direction...

My family will be moving into a house next weekend...as when I was there during the home inspection...as I noticed that the deck is sloping toward the house...where it should have been sloped away from the house....so I am wondering of what the remedy would be...as far as I don't know exactly how the deck was built....but would like to know several remedies to correct it...without having to tear it apart and rebuild...as I thought of changing the post depths, but not sure if it is good idea or not...

Tell me what the options are....

Thanks,
Rick
 
  #2  
Old 12-04-02, 05:46 PM
L
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
First, decks are almost always built LEVEL, not sloped. Why this one happens to be sloped could be due to a variety of causes. Maybe it has just settled. If it was attached the the house, there may be a problem with the ledger board pulling away from the house. It could be that whoever built the deck just needs a new, more accurate level.

HOW you would go about correcting this deck's slope would depend on WHY it is sloped in the first place. Need to figure that out first, then proceed from there.
 
  #3  
Old 12-04-02, 06:11 PM
andret
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Frost

I'm going to take a guess. You live in a region that is effected by frost.

If the footings where not dug below the frost line, they will slowly creap up to the top of the surface. It works similar to rocks in farm land (raised on a farm). Take a look at the footings and see if they look as if they have raised an inch or so.

During cold seasons, ice lenses form, exerting pressure against the rough edges of the concrete footing, forcing it upward. A pocket will form under the footing where the soil is not affected by frost. Dirt particles and water will then accumulate into this pocket. During the spring thaw, it is likely that the footing will not return to its original position (due to the accumulation of soil deposits). When repeated throughout the life of the deck, this process of lifting the footing can cause significant damage to the structural integrity of the deck and the connection to the house.
 
  #4  
Old 12-04-02, 07:18 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,817
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Deck problems

If the house is new construction, it is the builder's responsbility to correct the problems. If it is older construction, then it will be your responsibility. As already stated, the deck was improperly constructed. And, safety may be an issue, particularly if the deck has not been attached to the ledger board or if it has pulled away, as lefty indicated. If you are not deck savvy and as safety is an issue, I would have a contractor take a look at the deck.
 
  #5  
Old 12-05-02, 08:27 AM
Rick Krakora
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Yeah I guess so about the decks should be level...so I will check the levelness of the deck in spring when everything is thawed and settled and warm weather....as I had thought of this which I will attempt to maintain the deck at flat level....as well as to see the structure of how the deck was built....

Thanks for the info's!

Rick
 
  #6  
Old 12-05-02, 05:11 PM
L
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I think your last post kind of says it all. You are going to wait until "spring when everything is thawed and settled and warm weather" -- you are probably dealing with frost heave, as andret so well explained. The only way you are going to correct the problem and keep it from happening in the future is going to be to dig the footings for the deck down to below the frost line of your area. (Check with your local bldg. dept. to find out how deep that is.) Looks like that gives you 4 or 5 months to figure out how you are going to do it. First question -- is this deck worth the trouble of trying to level it, or would you be better off tearing it down and starting from scratch? (Whoever built it couldn't get the footings right -- what else did they screw up?) Are you going to run into rotten wood? How old is this deck? What type of wood(s) is it construced of? Time is on your side right now. Give us a description of the deck and how it was built, and over the next few weeks or months we can probably give you some pointers that will allow you to correct ALL of the problems that may exist.
 
  #7  
Old 12-05-02, 05:25 PM
andret
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
In the spring

If frost heave is the problem, the deck will not become level in the spring. You will need to either replace the entire deck or replace the footings with new ones burried below the frost line. It will only continue to get worse.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: