How poor for patio doors?????


  #1  
Old 12-18-02, 02:25 PM
incub8
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How poor for patio doors?????

So, I have nice brand new windows, but old patio doors. Previous owner too cheap to replace them when he had the windows done. I was wondering what I will be shelling out for 2 new sliding or french swing doors. The width is 8 feet and the height is standard size I believe. Yes it's a pretty big opening. Basically, I just need a rough price range, so I know rather to wait to sell my first born. Materials and labor cost???

-thanks!
 

Last edited by incub8; 12-18-02 at 02:41 PM.
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Old 12-18-02, 05:18 PM
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True French doors (both doors operating) will be the most expensive. Expect to pay $1200 and up, depending on the mfg and finish.

Sliders vary in price from dirt cheap to astronomical - do some research on the brands you select as possibilities.

An alternative (Benchmark makes one, as do others) is a two panel unit; one panel operates as a door, with the hinge in the center of the two panels. This is a steel door (another option to consider, as steel generaly is less expensive than wood) and should run under $650.
 
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Old 12-18-02, 06:02 PM
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Depends on how good of a door you want and whether you will be installing it or having it installed. If you are thinking of having it installed, call a couple of glass shops or contractors who retrofit windows and get estimates from them. Compare the quality of the sliders they are proposing to install, as well as the quality of their workmanship.

You can buy a so-so 8' slider at HD for something like $400 to $500. They have contractors who will install it for you, for whatever they are going to charge. You could spend a couple grand to get a Marvin or Pella 8' slider -- installation is extra.

8' french doors -- you are looking at a chunk of change. Most french doors are 6'. You might consider a 3/0 center door with 2/6 sidelights, or a 6/0 french door with a small sidelight on each side, or simply reducing the oping to 6/0 if you want to go with french doors.

Guess what I am saying is "Go shopping".
 
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Old 12-19-02, 01:24 PM
incub8
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Thanks!

Thanks, this confirms my thoughts about the estimated costs for either french style or sliding glass patio doors. We want good doors foir our home. But not necessarily the top of the line.


I really like the swinging type doors. Because I read they provide better insulation from the elements. And helps to keep your bills down. This being the main concern, second being looks. But having done more homework, I am finding that sliding glass doors provide equal if not better protection to swinging ones. Is this true????

I knew that if I went with french swinging, I would have to size down the width of the opening to meet a more standard 6foot. I like the idea of sidelight that open and let in air. But my wife rather get sliding patio doors.

What are the advantages of steel/aluminum/wood???? Besides cost?
What about wood and metal clad? I am thinking wood look on the interior and white on the exterior to match the paint.

Is Marvin and Pella the best? How about Anderson or Hurd???
 
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Old 12-30-02, 06:07 PM
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Sorry I didn't get back to you sooner. My computer died and I had to wait for Santa!

In your last post, you mentioned you want good doors, but not necessairly top of the line. Then you close by mentioning 4 top of the line doors. That's fine, but you can find doors with equal performance (energy efficiency), equal warranties, but without the name or the equal price tag. There is nothing wrong with any of the doors you mentioned, and I wouldn't hesitate to install any of them for a customer if that's what they wanted.

Yes, sliders provide equal or better protection, and have probably better insulating qualities than swinging doors. There are more spots where a mfgr. can seal a slider than there are on a swinging door, and no voids in that seal.

Vinyl, clad, or wood exterior. Wood veneer interior. It's doable, but you will have to do some shopping. Check with a couple of glass shops, with a couple of lumberyards where your local contractors shop, check your Yellow Pages, and on-line.
 
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Old 12-31-02, 11:06 AM
incub8
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No name brand patio doors.

We are gonna wait till summer to change the patio doors, but before I hammer down and start researching a ton of patio door companies and making a lot of phone calls. I want to hear from the experts out there. So far, the info I have recieve is very useful.

Where should I start to look for such brand-less name doors? Would you say that Home depot, Lowes or any of these large commercial companies sell these no-names. Quality-wise, is it the same? Insulation? UV protection? solid construction? How about the install? What is a fair cost for installation?

I called Pella and they priced their ProLine 8 feet wide door at $1500 and the install at another $800. This feels a little high, especially since I need two doors. But they said that they will have a sale come summer and the doors will be priced about $1200. Marvin said that they were higher then Pella.

I want decent quality without paying for the name. Am I wrong to think that $3000 and another $1600 is too much to pay for the affordable line from a company? The cost for these two doors is almost as much as all the windows in my home.

-thanks
 

Last edited by incub8; 12-31-02 at 11:41 AM.
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Old 12-31-02, 05:33 PM
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It's New Year's and you are getting ready for a summer project. That gives you some time to do the research. That's good.

Marvin, Pella, Anderson -- you're going to pay something for the name. (A lot like Cadillac or Lincoln.) There are literally thousands of window and door mfgrs. out there, and even more styles and features. Start narrowing your search. You seem to have already done a little of that with the wood interior and white exterior.

Next -- vinyl or clad? (What type of windows were installed in the house? Might want to stay with that.)

Compare warranties. Compare the NFRC festation ratings. (Those are like MPG stickers on a car, and every mfgr. is required to put them on every window they sell.) Visible light -- the higher the number, the more light passes through the window. With the other two, the LOWER the number, the better. (Something in the range of .28 to .32 is excellent.)

Low-E or Low-E squared glass -- I wouldn't buy a window without it.

You will be hearing a lot of sales pitch. Take notes, and take your time. You should be looking at something in the range of a $2,000 to $3,000 investment.
 
 

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