Deck life expectancy

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  #1  
Old 07-15-00, 03:31 PM
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How long will wolmanized decks last? I know about the 30 year gaurantee but I've seen some look horrible in a lot less time. Strong sun is a killer. I'm looking at a house with 2500 square feet of deck that is ten years old. Should I be concerned about replacement 10 or 15 years from now when I would want to sell? How often and how expensive is it to maintain? I'm thinking about doing a section at a time every few years. Replacing a deck this large is financially out of the question.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-15-00, 04:43 PM
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Sun, rain. snow -- they will all take their toll on the deck. How long it might last depends a lot on the weather it is exposed to and how well you keep it sealed. Thompson's, Behr, Super Deck, etc. all make sealers. Check with a local paint shop and see what they recommend. And keep an eye on not only the deck boards but also the supporting structure. Replace bad boards when you find them.
 
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Old 07-16-00, 12:00 PM
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Thank you for your quick reply. Replacing boards as they are needed is good advice, instead of waiting until it is too late. I've used the wolmanized natural stain (and sealer, I believe). I thought wolmanized would know best how to protect their product. Now that I think about it who knows the real manufacturer of their sealer. Do you think Thompsons or super deck sealer is better?

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by lefty:
Sun, rain. snow -- they will all take their toll on the deck. How long it might last depends a lot on the weather it is exposed to and how well you keep it sealed. Thompson's, Behr, Super Deck, etc. all make sealers. Check with a local paint shop and see what they recommend. And keep an eye on not only the deck boards but also the supporting structure. Replace bad boards when you find them.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

 
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Old 07-16-00, 08:33 PM
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You did not say what kind of wood your deck was made of. Green treated, fir, pine, cidar, redwood. Each one has a different life span. If you know let me know.
 
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Old 07-19-00, 01:17 PM
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Is rain or sun your deck's primary enemy? Given that Superdeck costs about $25 a gallon, and Thompsons cost about $10 a gallon, my own personal subjective opinion is that Thompsons is overpriced -- especially if UV is a major problem.
 
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Old 07-29-00, 09:02 AM
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Jack the Contractor:
You did not say what kind of wood your deck was made of. Green treated, fir, pine, cidar, redwood. Each one has a different life span. If you know let me know.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Wolmanized or green treated, I always assumed that green treated was fir treated. It did not seem logical to me to treat pine.
 
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Old 07-29-00, 09:04 AM
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Sheetrocker:
Originally posted by Jack the Contractor:
You did not say what kind of wood your deck was made of. Green treated, fir, pine, cidar, redwood. Each one has a different life span. If you know let me know.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Wolmanized or green treated, I always assumed that green treated was fir treated. It did not seem logical to me to treat pine.
 
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Old 07-29-00, 09:12 AM
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Sheetrocker:
Originally posted by Jack the Contractor:
You did not say what kind of wood your deck was made of. Green treated, fir, pine, cidar, redwood. Each one has a different life span. If you know let me know.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Wolmanized or green treated, I always assumed that green treated was fir treated. It did not seem logical to me to treat pine.

Is it always necessary to powerwash before applying the sealer. If surface is in decent shape will a hose with the power spray get it clean enough. I've used a bucket with a strong mix of chlorox and water to remove the mildew.

Sun is the problem on my current deck, I think water and snow will be the major problem on the new house.
 
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Old 07-30-00, 06:36 AM
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You can power wash if you like, but I am a anti power wash kind of guy. My theory is if I am trying to get my deck dry to seal it, why get it wet. I would not use Thompsons.
I would use a good penetrating clear stain/sealer combined. You will have to redo it in in about 2 to 3 years even with the best sealers. the sun draws the goodies right out of the wood. Good Luck
 
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Old 07-31-00, 05:37 PM
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Jack the Contractor:
You can power wash if you like, but I am a anti power wash kind of guy. My theory is if I am trying to get my deck dry to seal it, why get it wet. I would not use Thompsons.
I would use a good penetrating clear stain/sealer combined. You will have to redo it in in about 2 to 3 years even with the best sealers. the sun draws the goodies right out of the wood. Good Luck
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thank you for your input, this answers all my questions ... without having to powerwash my cost will go down significantly. By doing it every two or three years I can stagger the 2500 square feet.

 
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