Cantilever...


  #1  
Old 06-09-03, 05:55 AM
SillyMike
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Cantilever...

Facts:

28' wide deck, 18" off ground.

Beam is double 2x10, posts every 5 feet, joists 2x10. From ledger to beam is 8.5', 16" OC (except curved center, 12" oc)

Issue:

I'm reading some VERY conflicting info. I'd like to cantilever the deck 16" which I know is fine. But in the center of the deck I'd like to do a curve, with the center of the curve being a 30" cantilever, and then coming in from there to meet the 16" cantilever of the rest of the edge. I'm reading here that 24" is the maximum, but I'm reading in books, etc. differently. I would have like to have a post out at the 2' mark on that center joist... but that water under the bridge at this point.

Any ideas... I know one idea is to reduce the main cantilever from 16" out down to 10" and then drop the curved 30 down 24"...

The important thing to keep in mind is that the center of curve will be 30" out, but then the joists on the right and left of the center of the curve will work back into the baseline of the cantilever... my thoughts were to use between-the-joist bracing to firm things up. I can't see getting much spring out of 2x10 with this this setup. But I'd like to run it by you guys.

Thanks,

Mike
 
  #2  
Old 06-09-03, 08:14 AM
L
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Location: Arlington, WA
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IMHO, you will be happier with the deck years from now if you can reduce the cantilever. Your thought -- "reduce the main cantilever from 16" out down to 10" and then drop the curved 30 down 24"..." -- that is probably the most workable.

I don't think the problem is so much the "springyness" of the 2X10's being cantilevered 30". It has more to do with the amount of leverage that will give those 2X10's to loosen their attachment to the beams farther back in the deck. It's not something that you will notice in the first few years, while things are relativily new. But, as that lumber dries and ages, and goes through alternating periods of being subjected to wet and cold, followed by dry and heat, ...
 
 

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