Deck rot

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  #1  
Old 03-06-04, 07:57 PM
dinday
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Deck rot

I have a large wooden deck with redwood 4X14 joists. I am replacing the decking adn find that there is some rot down the center line of the upper joist surfaces.

I have excavated the soft, decayed wood and have been treating the remaining wood with Minwax Wood Hardener prior to filling the voids with wood filler. However, it is a large deck, and Minwax hardener is expensive. This preparation is a mixture of solvents including methel ethyl ketone, and probably xylol from the smell, and has some unspecified "resins" dissolved in it.

My question is: Does any experienced carpenter out there know of a recipe for a similar potion to firm up that soft, rotted wood prior to filling? I am thinking that it should not be that difficutl to dissolve some specific plastic or resin in MEK and/or xylol to achieve the same end.

Any ideas? Thank you.

Brian
 
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Old 03-06-04, 09:09 PM
L
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Why all the chemicals??

Cut out the rot and sister 2X's onto the existing joists, then redeck it.
 
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Old 03-07-04, 07:40 AM
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Brian,

Trying to put a band aid on a bad situation is asking for trouble.

As Lefty mentioned, replacement or sistering, if feasible, is in order.

Good Luck!
 
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Old 03-08-04, 08:10 AM
dinday
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Deck rot again

Thanks for the responses, but I have every intention of sistering the joists, but I want to treat the tops of the old joists in addition, to STOP further rot. I think the tops of ALL outdoor deck joists should be treated prior to decking.

So, any ideas?
 
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Old 03-08-04, 09:00 AM
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Once redwood starts to rot, I know of no chemical that will stop it. The solution is to cut out the affected areas and sister on new joists, as you will be doing, or to replace the affected joists totally.

Treating the joists prior to installing the decking will lengthen the life of the joists. Problem is, once the decking is in place, getting to the tops of the joists to RETREAT them becomes next to impossible.

Personally, I am questioning the use of redwood for the joists when the deck was built; and wondering why 4X14's were used. A 4X is too wide to be used as a joist -- it traps too much water and will rot. A 4X 8, 10, or 12 for the beam(s) to support the joists works fine. Plenty of air circualtion above it to allow it to dry out.
 
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Old 03-08-04, 11:51 AM
dinday
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Deck Rot

Dear Lefty:


Thank you for the input. Minwax's "Wood Hardener", (the product that I have used) is not just a chemical to kill fungus, bacteria, etc. It is a solvent with resins and plastic dissolved in it. When it dries, the resins are left behind, restoring the rotted wood to stiff, hard condition. Thereafter, it cannot be penetrated by rot, because it is part plastic. I would still like to duplicate this product, and if I find a recipe, I will pass it along.

Thanks again.

Brian
 
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Old 03-12-04, 10:19 AM
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I think I understand that you will maintain the structural integrity with 2x4s but you also want to fill the void after you cut out the rot to keep water and junk from getting in.

I had a similar situation where it was too difficult to replace something and structural integrity was not the issue. My solution was to use auto body filler such as Bondo. After I cut out the rot, I screwed in stainless screws into the wood for the filler to attach to, kind of like rebar. This stuff is very tenacious! It really holds well, drys fast, and I look at it regularly (3 years now) and it looks great. I think it's similar to the minwax stuff.

I don't think it penetrates like you are saying, but if all of the bad wood is gone maybe you don't need penetration.

I use a 3" or 4" putty knife to mix it up (filler and catalyst) on a piece of 2x6.

Rob
 
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