ok to use nails for mahogany decking?

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  #1  
Old 06-09-04, 04:12 PM
brian7972
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ok to use nails for mahogany decking?

5/4 x 6" mahogany decking.

16" O/C joists

three, 16 guage (nail gun), stainless steel finish nails on each board, the outer nails angled toward each other and the inner nail straight down.

I'm trying to avoid screws, of course.

If it helps your answer, we are in New England, but plan on being in this house for no more than 5 more years.

Thanks!
 
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Old 06-09-04, 10:26 PM
L
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What do you mean, you are "trying to avoid screws, of course." WHY??

Sorry, screws are the fastener of choice for a deck. Sure, my nail gun IS faster than my DuraSpin, but I would NEVER nail a deck for a customer. And if the DuraSpin were to break, I would get out the Dewalt 14.4 screw guns and PAY the crew to screw the deck that way. NAILS??? Not a chance!!
 
  #3  
Old 06-10-04, 09:27 AM
brian7972
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Thanks for the reply lefty.

I'm trying to avoid screws for two primary reasons...they're ugly and they take much longer to install.

The reputable lumber folks who sold me the mahogany gave me the exact opposite reaction as you. "Why in the world would you use screws on one inch mahogany?" Their sense was that the boards won't cup or warp, so no need for the super-protection of screws, unlike what pressure treated would do. They felt that as long as I toed in with 2.5" nails, I would be fine.

Is there really that much of a difference between nailing and screws on mahogany? (On PT lumber, yes, I know why there would be a difference.)

Thanks for your insights...
 
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Old 06-10-04, 10:02 AM
brian7972
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Thanks to lefty's comments, I've done some more reading and am leaning toward the screws now for the following reasons:

1. I'm nailing into relatively green PT lumber. As it dries out, it might lose grip on the stainless steel (i.e slippery) nails.

2. Nail guns are quick, but not the best fastening method.

3. Increase chance of squeaking with stainless nails.

4. I don't need to rent a nail gun and compressor and be pressed for time like I was planning.

5. I can return the $80 box of stainless steel finish nails.

So, lefty, now that you've helped convince me to screw in, do you recommend 2 or 3 screws per joist?

Finally, flush or countersink (if countersink, how much ?)

Thanks again....
 
  #5  
Old 06-10-04, 01:54 PM
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Using ringshank nails is as good as using screws. I screwed ONE deck for someone and i hate the look of it. I will keep using screw nails for those i hand nail. I took a deck apart a bit over 2 months ago for my dad. It was 2x8 joists and 2x8 decking and all nailed, that deck was up since 1977. I had to use a 3' pry bar and sledge hammer to take the deck off. Now tell me what is wrong with using screw nails again?

Sorry lefty, i cant resist arguing about using screws. The heads pop off and you land up zawsawing them off to replace a board. Not everyone uses quality deck screws, they use the cheap coated ones and they start to rust within a year. I wouldnt put it past some people to use drywall screws.
 
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Old 06-10-04, 04:31 PM
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5/4 mahogany can in fact cup and warp.

Find a colored/coated screw that will match thw wood, preferably a #2 square drive deck screw and you won't be stripping the heads like phillips. Just put 'em in flush not sunk.

fred
 
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Old 06-11-04, 12:47 PM
amyswagart
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I'm so glad I found this forum, but now I've got to ask yet ANOTHER question.....sorry!

I'm now concerend I didn't purchase quality screws! I bought them at HomeDepot (can't remember the name) but they came in a clear plastic tub with a green lid (25# for $75 I think). I bought the green coated ones but you could also buy a gold'ish color. Do they make other colors as well? Neither the gold or the green matched very well with the walnut so I just went with the darker of the two.

Is there a particular brand you recommend that has a more options then the green and gold?
 
  #8  
Old 06-18-04, 07:10 AM
brian7972
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Ok, after speaking with 4 other people in my area who build decks, 3 out of 4 of them recommended virtually the same thing... 2.5" stainless steel ring shank nails, 2 per board, not toed in. I went and looked at a deck one of these guys did 6 years ago and it's still beautiful. So, I've changed my mind (again) and have arranged for a nail gun to be delivered tomorrow AM.

HOWEVER, we just got 1" of rain last night and it's fairly cool and drier today. Should I wait to nail the boards down ? (I was planning on doing that tomorrow). Should I wait until late Sunday or Monday?

Thanks.....!
 
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Old 06-18-04, 07:37 AM
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That's about right!

Three out of four people who build decks can't afford a good screw gun, or are won't take the time to build a deck properly.

my last post on this topic,
fred
 
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Old 06-18-04, 08:04 PM
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Or they think decks that are screwed are exactly that. There is nothing wrong with using ringshank or screw nails on a deck. Nails have been used and proven long before screws were even on the market. Next someone will suggest building houses with screws too...
 
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Old 06-18-04, 11:19 PM
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Hellrazor,

You are right -- nails WERE around long before screws. (Model "A"s were around long before my DuraMax, too). Ringshank nails -- that's about the same a '55 Chevy in this whole thing, with the stovebolt small block. An impovement, but how do they stack up TODAY??

Screw the deck. That's today's technology. 20 or 30 years from now somebody WILL have a better system.
 
  #12  
Old 06-19-04, 10:08 AM
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The difference is, nails are still being produced and used daily. The only difference now is the use of green wet treated lumber that twists. I buy kiln dried pressure treat, costs more but doesn't end up looking like it should have been a long bow.
 
 

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