building front porch cover with columns

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  #1  
Old 07-21-04, 01:12 PM
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TKEcowboy
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building front porch cover with columns

I have a brick house with a flat-faced elevation. My front door is taking a beating from the sun and rain. I'm considering building a cover with a couple of columns in each front corner. I would also like to build a flat top over it with a railing around the top. I'll post a link to picture of an example if I can find one.
I am an experienced woodworker, but could use some good pointers on this project such as types of material to use for the columns, how to join it to the brick over the door, etc. Thanks.

Glenn
 
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  #2  
Old 01-05-05, 07:30 PM
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Brent1
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I would like to tacke the same project and have the same questions. Bumping this up with hope to get some advice.
 
  #3  
Old 01-09-05, 06:38 AM
L
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A small roof isn't that difficult to construct. But I would suggest a gabled roof, rather than a flat roof. A flat roof is going to limit what you can use for roofing material. Asphalt shignles, which is probably what most people would go with, need a minimum pitch of 3/12 to seal properly and not leak. With a brick house, think in terms of making the cover freestanding (posts at all 4 corners) and flashing the roof-to-wall joint.

One option for the posts would be to install them 1st then use a composite sleeve to cover them. (Look at composite deck materials at a local lumberyard.) No maintenance, and they will never rot.
 
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Old 01-09-05, 09:24 AM
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Tkecowboy & Brent1,

The easiest way to attach the roof to wall is to attach a ledger. I would use a lag and lead shield in the grout joist or dill gently into the briack and attach an anchor. I would then lag on a 2x6 pressure treated ledger. I then would hang rafters @ 24" on center in u26 (simpson hangers). I would set the ledger high enough to allow the 3 inch in 12 inch slope as lefty suggested. I would use a 4x4 pressure treated post in the two front corners and use a pc 44 cap to attach to a pressure treated beam ( rule of thumb for each 2 foot in length of span you need 2" in nominal size for instance a 4' span would need a 4x4 beam, a 6' span would need a 4x6 beam etc...).You would need to attach the post at the base so I would use a pb44 post base or equal. With a 3/12 pitch you can use most roofing materials. I would then use the column wraps as lefty suggested or add 2x trim around the posts to build them out.

I hope this helps.

Brian Garrison
General Contractor/Professional Building Designer
 
  #5  
Old 01-09-05, 04:08 PM
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TKEcowboy
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The reason I am limited to a flat roof is because of the small area between the top of the door and the bottom of the foyer window. I would expect to have a small bit of slope even on a flat roof to help with rain drainage, but there's no way to build an actual gable style roof.

Glenn
 
  #6  
Old 01-09-05, 04:24 PM
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OK,

Then some type of metal roofing will work.

"Metal roofing" can be as ugly (IMHO) as coraggated tin, or maybe step up to a metal ridge (like as is used on metal buildings), or go with an aluminum "flat pan" patio cover (check sites like Texas Aluminum or Metals USA).
 
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