Staining a year old pressure treated deck.

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  #1  
Old 08-06-04, 04:33 PM
Sabina
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Staining a year old pressure treated deck.

Last year we had a deck built with pressure treated wood. We were adviced to let it weather before staining it. I went to Home Depot and asked for advice and they told me I must use a wood cleaning chemical before attempting to stain. Someone elso told me I should sand it well. I thought I could just stain it since it is not really dirty, but apparently the chemicals in it could interfere? Can anyone advice me on the best way to go? I would like to use a semitransparent natural cedar stain.
Thanks so much.
Sabina
 
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Old 08-06-04, 06:05 PM
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If it's a year old it's already started to weather grey.
You were informed wrong then about waiting. Now it does need cleaned/brightened. Go to a regular paint store and ask for a deck brightener containing sodium percarbonate. You won'y find it at HD or Lowes!. It's crystal form and needs mixed with warm water. It can then be sprayed or mopped on and given a 10 to 15 dwell time. Scrubbing or preferably pressure washing will bring it back to like new condition.

While at the above same lumber store check out the oil base penetrating stains by Sikkens, Cabots, Wolman F&P. They all have a semi-trans cedar color.

fred
 
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Old 08-06-04, 08:07 PM
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Staining

You may not have been informed wrongly about waiting for your deck to acclimatize before staining because whether or not you wait before staining depends upon the type of deck lumber you used and where you live (in relation to your climate).

That said, cleaning the deck first as fewalt stated is a good practice but so too is cleaning the deck with a mildewcide or other 'antibiotic' agent to kill any naturally occuring organisms who may have started to break down your (even treated) wood.
 
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Old 08-06-04, 08:27 PM
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Most quality deck stains are formulated for application to pressure treated lumber after about three weeks drying time. Most pt lumber is wet and not kd, but will dry adequately for staining in a few weeks. Waiting any longer will invite misc. food stains and the damaging effect of uv radiation.

The cleaner/brightener mentioned, sodium percarbonate, is an oxygenated bleach and WILL kill algae and mildew. It is better than household bleach because it is safer and will not bleach the color out of nor damage the wood.

Sabina,
also , to answer your other post re your cedar structure.
The preferred cleaner for cedar is an oxalic acid wash. Unfortunately, you would need to clean the entire structure to avoid streaking. You start at the bottom and work your way up.

fred
 
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Old 08-06-04, 08:33 PM
Sabina
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Thanks a lot for a prompt reply. I will get the deck brightener you've suggested. I used Benjamin Moore's stain for the porche sides. Is sikkens better for a deck? or are they comparable.
We are in Ontario, Canada and I don't know wich type of lumber was used.
Thanks again.
 
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Old 08-06-04, 08:51 PM
Sabina
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Thanks again, it sounds like cleaning the water stains in the gazebo's ceiling will be a lot of work if I have to do the whole thing. If I just leave it for now will the water stains fade eventually? Also I stained the outside but not the inside of the structure. Is it better to stain the inside as well to avoid graying? So far it hasn't grayed at all.
Thanks,
Sabina
 
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Old 08-07-04, 07:42 AM
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Sabina,

I'm not sure which brands are available up "North", but the Ben. Moore stain sh be okay if it is a penetrating oil and has uv inhibitors. The Sikkens is good(and expensive) and you need to follow application directions carefully.

The gazebo inside will fade slower sincw it's mainly covered. You could try to cover the water marks on the ceiling(for now) with a semi-trans. stain if you like - give it a test.

fred
PS: wish I was up at Stoney Lake (No. of Peterborough) right now fishin' for Muskie!!!
 
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Old 08-08-04, 10:12 PM
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Not So

"Most quality deck stains are formulated for application to pressure treated lumber after about three weeks drying time. Most pt lumber is wet and not kd, but will dry adequately for staining in a few weeks. Waiting any longer will invite misc. food stains and the damaging effect of uv radiation."

Not so.

Whether or not one should stain immediately or after a period of time depends entirely upon how much moisture content is in the treated lumber, what the climate is where you live, and a number of other factors.

Anyone telling you that you should stain (nearly) immediately under all circumstances has no clue what he is talking about and should not be trusted as a proper advisor for deck coating.
 
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Old 08-10-04, 06:40 AM
Everett Abrams
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The true way to determine whether or not to coat the deck is by use of a wood moisture meter. Always check with manufacturer's recommendations but, most will advise for a reading below 15%. 12% is an ideal number, this moisture content will vary depending on climate and time of year.

It is recommended by the USDA Forest Products Laboratory and the Western Cedar Lumber Association to put a coating on, depending on wood type, as soon as you reach that moisture content. Further, this will usually means in 2-4 weeks. You will need to clean if this time expires.

The Power Washers of North America have also adopted these recommendations in their Wood Certification Program.
 
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Old 08-10-04, 05:01 PM
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Drying Times

While I am not disputing the findings of the professional associations I am disagreeing that most exterior lumber will reach a 12-15% moisture content or equilibrium suitable for coating within 3-4 week.

Unless one is installing kiln dried after treatment lumber, (which typically dries the lumber to the 12-15% mentioned above) these 3-4 week periods are unrealistic and overly optimistic.

The reality is, that treated lumbers from the lumber yard are most often kept outside, open to the elements, and have newly treated moisture contents well above 75% or more in many cases.

It can take months and months for the moisture content of this lumber to air dry and reach the 12-15% recommended by the professional associations (if ever) depending upon the climate and weather, humidity and temperature.

The answer remains, despite the idealistic advice of the lumber lobbyists cited above, that whether or not you can or should stain or coat a deck, depends entirely upon the mositure content of the lumber, and that content can make the lumber uncoatable for months on end.
 
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Old 08-14-04, 08:13 PM
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AGAIN, as I mentioned above, most quality deck stains have been formulated to be applied soon after a deck is built. Application instructions will vary and should be followed closely.
Also, these are oil penetrating stains and will penetrate the surface adequately to begin protecting the deck. Continued drying of the wood will not bother the applied penetrating stain. We're not talking congealing film base finishes here which are going to peel due to wet wood.

fred
 
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