Proper treatment for new pressure treated deck

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Old 09-21-04, 09:01 PM
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Question Proper treatment for new pressure treated deck

I am currently in the process of having a deck built with new pressure treated wood. How soon should I apply a protective sealer to the wood? The lumber dealer indicated that a product such as CFW (Clear Wood Finish) should be applied within a few days after the deck is completed, but it seems to me that the lumber would still be too wet to absorb the sealer. Other products recommend waiting 30 to 60 days before application. I am considering using McClosky's Man O' War (a division of Valspar) transparent stain. Has anyone had experience with this product? Part of the deck is in full sun, part has morning sun and afternoon shade, and part is in full shade. This is my first encounter with a pressure treated deck, so I would appreciate any advice from those who have been down this path before. I would like to do it right. Thanks
 
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Old 09-22-04, 05:45 AM
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Don,

There is a consensus on a wood restoration forum I am a member of to wait about 30 days for the lumber to dry to about a 12% moisture level. Most newer deck stains have been formulated to be applied to non kd lumber.

Even though it is new pt wood it should be cleaned (lightly pressure washed) using an oxalic acid wash to remove mill glaze. Lightly pressure washed means 1000 to 1500 psi with a 40 degree tip. Allow about three days to dry and you are ready for a stain.

Most professional deck restorers will recommend a penetrating oil stain with water repellancy and UV protection. Some brands also include mildewcides.
Some of the better oil stains are Cabots, Sikkens, Wolman F&P, Readyseal, Superdeck, Penofin, Menwood, and a couple others.

Do Not use the Man o War! It is a film forming spar varnish and it WILL be peeling in a year from now. PERIOD! I know from experience.

fred
 
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Old 10-02-04, 12:31 AM
Icemancomth
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My Rule Of Thumb

My Rule Of Thumb
When To Stain Deck


There are many different opinions on this subject some say wait a year other say like wait 3 weeks. There is no rule to this. If you live in a dry climate then you do not have to wait long. If it hasn't rained after you built your deck then stain it. Most quality deck stains have been formulated to be applied soon after a deck is built.

Most PT wood is dry at to within 15%-12% of moisture content. But if the wood is left out side at a lumberyard or home improvement store then there is no telling how much moisture is in the wood. Then it is wise to wait a two weeks before staining. (No rain during that period) If you put a drop of water on a deck and it soaks up quickly into the wood then you are okay to start staining. The deck is dry enough. Or you can buy a wood moisture meter that will tell you how much moisture is in the wood. All above is depending on climate and time of year you built your deck.

I have some articals and links on this subject. Copy and past this link http://decks.hemmingsjones.com

Iceman
www.dvdhomestudios.com
 
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Old 10-03-04, 10:42 AM
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Not True

icemancometh said: "Most PT wood is dry at to within 15%-12% of moisture content."

This is not true.

Only specially ordered 'kiln dried after treatment' treated lumber has a controlled mositure content of between 12-15% and little if any treated lumber on the shelf in any lumber yard is "kiln dried after treatement".

Most treated lumbers have variable moisture contents ranging upwards to 40% when purchased regardless of how they are stored in the lumber yard.

It is true, that when to treat depends on the climate, but it also depends on the moisture content of the lumber as fewalt stated.

Getting moisture content from 40% or more down to 12-15% can take a year or more depending upon your climate.

And whether one should wait to seal treated lumber even with high moisture contents depends on the location.

Using extremely wet treated lumber in a very hot, dry climate may still require immediate sealing since left unsealed, wet treated lumber can dry out too quickly under such extremes and actually contribute to excess shrinking, twisting, cupping, warpping, splitting and so forth.

What we all do agree on is there is no set 'rule' when dealing with treated lumber and the rule will be set by your complete circumstances including moisture content, climate and location.
 
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Old 10-06-04, 04:51 PM
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how 'bout OLD pt wood?

I have an OLD deck made of PT wood. I know it hasn't been cleaned in awhile, but I don't know whether it was ever "sealed." After I clean it, what should I do? The deck faces northeast. It is in full shade. It's got quite a bit of mildew on it.

Also, I'm a little confused about dryness. I live in New England and we are entering the rainy season. There are few times when there are four straight days of dry weather.


Originally Posted by fewalt
Don,

There is a consensus on a wood restoration forum I am a member of to wait about 30 days for the lumber to dry to about a 12% moisture level. Most newer deck stains have been formulated to be applied to non kd lumber.

Even though it is new pt wood it should be cleaned (lightly pressure washed) using an oxalic acid wash to remove mill glaze. Lightly pressure washed means 1000 to 1500 psi with a 40 degree tip. Allow about three days to dry and you are ready for a stain.

Most professional deck restorers will recommend a penetrating oil stain with water repellancy and UV protection. Some brands also include mildewcides.
Some of the better oil stains are Cabots, Sikkens, Wolman F&P, Readyseal, Superdeck, Penofin, Menwood, and a couple others.

Do Not use the Man o War! It is a film forming spar varnish and it WILL be peeling in a year from now. PERIOD! I know from experience.

fred
 
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Old 10-06-04, 05:49 PM
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Clean it now or wait till spring.
If you throw water on it and it beads, it may need to be stripped.
But it probably only needs an oxygenated bleach cleaning (sodium percarbonate), and either scrubbed or pressure washed. Find the oxygenated bleach at a regular paint store. Lowes/HD don't always carry the best products.
Two good days of sunshine after cleaning and you can stain.

fred
 
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Old 10-07-04, 10:39 AM
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Old PT Wood Deck

Thanks for your repsonse. One point for clarification. Stupid question, probably. After I clean the deck and wait two days, you said I could stain it. Does the stain "seal" also?
Thanks for your time!
Loren
 
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Old 10-07-04, 07:32 PM
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Loren,

"Sealing" is really a misnomer. You can't completely seal outdoor wood unless you seal ALL six sides of each piece of lumber - nearly impossible!.
So, we try to protect it as best we can. Find an oil base penetrating stain with water repellancy and UV protection. The sun can do more damage to pt than water.

good luck,
fred
 
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