Porch Post

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  #1  
Old 04-14-05, 07:46 AM
Stephanie Brust
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Porch Post

I have a question about porch posts. We are building a front porch that has 3 courses of continuous concrete block. We have installed the rim joists and ledger attached to the house, the 2x8 Pt floor joist that span the 8 feet width of the porch. The porch is 36 feet in length across the front of the house. We want to install tongue and grove pine floor boards that have a water repellent and oil based primer on them prior to installation. We are using 6x6 posts. What is the best way to install the post on the deck of the porch? The porch will be covered with a roof that is attached to the band of the house. My questions are how and when do we need to install the post, and also your opinions on the porch flooring choice.

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Stephanie
 
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Old 04-14-05, 10:01 AM
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The posts won't be installed ON the deck. You need a footing under each post, or at least have the post sitting on the mud sill -- the PT 2X that lays flay on top of the blocks.

Hopefully you have pulled any permits that may be necessary for this project.
 
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Old 04-14-05, 10:14 AM
Stephanie Brust
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Thanks for the reply. This is new construction. We have completed the house and was putting the porch on before we finished the sding in the front. All permitting has been secured. As for the post...How is a 6x6 post going to sit on a 2x4 sill plate with half of it already covered by the rim joist?
 
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Old 04-14-05, 10:40 AM
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Stephanie,

The T&G pine decking is simply not going to support the weight of the roof. That's why you don't want to set the posts on the decking. You want the posts to sit on a solid footing below the deck, and they get installed before the decking goes down.
 
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Old 04-14-05, 12:19 PM
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Here in NH the footings of 4' depth would have to have been put in first then the hardware to keep the 6x6 from touching the concrete footings. For a span as wide as yours we would have 5 footings and posts. From there we would pre build our triple beam of 2x10 pt for the span and then use more hardware to fasten that to our posts. This framing method would then support your rim joists and floor joists. Just a thot for ya.
-Bob
 
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Old 04-14-05, 01:11 PM
Stephanie Brust
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Here's my problem... I have 8" of concrete footing that goes around the entire porch outline, then I laid concrete block around the perimeter on top of the footer 3 courses of concrete block high. I used 2x4 PT sill plate and made a box from the 2x8 rim joist and ledger board. The porch is 36 feet in length and 8 feet wide. I used 2x8 PT joist running perpendicular to the house ( running the 8 ft width). I am now ready to put the post and decking down. The plan for the roof is that is attaches to the band joist between the first and second floor of the house with ceiling joist that sit on top of a beam that rests on the posts and rafters coming from the ledger board attached to the house. I am at a loss as to what to do with the post. I thought that I could lay the deck boards, then attach the post with some sort of bracket and the concrete footing and blocks would be enough support but that doesn't seem to be the right way. My question is what can I do now since I have the foundation and joist already completed? Why would I need another footer if the concrete block is on a 8" concrete footer already and the post will sit ontop of the block?
 
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Old 04-14-05, 01:43 PM
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Where you're at? Is frost, snow load, or wind load a factor in all of this? It matters. For Bob53, in NH, frost is an issue -- that's why he is talking about footings that are 4' deep. For me, there are very few places around here where frost is an issue, but snow and wind loads are.

Your 8" deep footing isn't enough to support a roof -- even one with an 8' projection. The footings need to be at least 12" deep -- more if frost is an issue. A 6X6 post is overkill -- unless snow load is an issue. But you can certainly use them for appearance. Post spacing is determined by the size of beam you'll be using.

What you need is a footing for each post that is at least 12" deep, and at least 4 or 5 inches above grade (You have plenty of room -- I would have 8" above grade.) Put the footings inside the block foundation wall. Set a Simpson CB66 or PB66 in the concrete as soon as you pour each footing. Give the footings several days to cure, then set your posts, the beam, and the roof rafters. Then you can roof it and deck it.
 
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Old 04-14-05, 02:02 PM
Stephanie Brust
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I am located in Louisiana where snow or frost are not an issue.
 
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Old 04-14-05, 04:03 PM
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Reading back to your saying that it is new construction correct? Then, you mention a perimeter of 8" footing. Do you mean 8" thick? If so, then in reality the footing was already poured during the foundation phase, correct? It had to be poured according to code. Then , you added 3 courses of block to bring up the height of the foundation? If all this is correct so far, then I am assuming you are probably good to add your decking and posts. Assuming that the block was assembled correctly. 6x6 is definately overkill, unless you are looking for a really "beefy" look to the porch. A 4x4 or even pre fab PT columns carved from 4x4 are available also. It sounds like you are going for a "Farmers Porch Look?"
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-Bob
 

Last edited by Bob53; 04-14-05 at 04:17 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 04-14-05, 05:02 PM
Stephanie Brust
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Yes all that is correct. So I can deck the porch and then place the columns since they will be supported by the footing and the concrete block? Yes, the farmhouse look is the style. Thanks for your help.

Stephanie
 
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Old 04-14-05, 05:37 PM
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Sounds like you're good to go! GOOD LUCK AND POST BACK TO LET US KNOW.
 
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Old 04-15-05, 01:22 PM
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Stephanie,

I may have misread you last post, and if I did , I apologize. But no, you can't deck the porch and THEN set the posts. You have to set the posts, and THEN deck the porch -- cut the decking around the posts.

Bob53 is thinking (if I can put words in his mouth) that because this is new construction and the inspector saw the trenches for the footings before any concrete was poured, then an 8" thick footing must be OK. I agree with his logic. It could well be that 8" is all the thicker of a footing that you need in LA. (It would never fly in CA, but I have to abide by a different set of codes, and I'm in a different seismic zone.)

But the posts need to sit on the block foundation, or on their own separate footings, whatever the approved plans show. They cannot sit on the 1X6 T7G pine -- THAT won't support the weight of the roof.
 
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Old 04-15-05, 04:44 PM
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Greetings from NH lefty, if her decking is square to the sill plate edge, and her sill plate is square to her blocks, and the blocks are squarely on the footings, doesn't that provide sufficient weight transfer for her posts to support her porch roof if her posts are squarely plumbed over the footings and block wall? Just wondering here. If you are picturing her posts just sitting on the T&G pine with a hollow joist bay below then, you are absolutely correct. I am assuming that the posts will at a minimum be located over a double joist supported by joists hangers.
 
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Old 04-15-05, 04:49 PM
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Hello Stephanie, I've read these posts and I think things are getting too complicated here. From what I read what you are asking is can you set your roof supports for your porch on top of your porch decking. If thats correct I'd say go for it. Thats the way this porch is done on this farmhouse here. One thing I might add is to place your posts directly over your concrete footings, but in this case, where it is a continuous wall I guess it wouldn't matter as much. I'd say these are about 7 or 8" apart..........Just my 2 cents.
 
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Old 04-15-05, 08:04 PM
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Stephanie,

What I've been trying to tell you is that you need a continuous path from the beam, thruough the post, to the footing. SOLID SUPPORT! If you triple up the floor joists where the posts are going to sit, that would work. What you DON'T want is to have the posts just sitting on the 1X6 decking with no support under the decking. The weight of the roof will just punch the post right through the decking in time.
 
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Old 04-16-05, 05:52 AM
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Hi lefty, I believe we agree. One just has a west coast point of view and the other an east coast point of view. However, I believe we both mean the same thing.
 
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