How long to wait before sealing new treated wood decking

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-18-06, 03:30 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Houston Texas
Posts: 42
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How long to wait before sealing new treated wood decking

Our dock just got finished and the contractor told me that the lumber wholesaler where he picks up his decking sell so much wood that the decking hasn't had much time to sit in the yard and comes pretty fresh from the lumber treatment facility. Should I let the decking "season" for a few days or weeks before considering a sealer or get on it right away.

Consumer reports likes the opaque sealers and I don't mind the dock taking on some color. Can these be rolled or brushed on to avoid over spray into the water?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-18-06, 06:50 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,308
Received 47 Votes on 44 Posts
Treated lumber contains chemicals which inhibit adhesion of sealer. If you let it sit for a season, they should outgas and you'll be fine. If it was just built, I'd wait til late spring.
 
  #3  
Old 02-18-06, 07:17 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mitch17
If it was just built, I'd wait til late spring.
I would agree
 
  #4  
Old 02-18-06, 11:07 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,064
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
Me three

Depending on the material it may or may not roll well but can definetly be brushed.
 
  #5  
Old 02-19-06, 04:18 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 143
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
According the the lumber manufacturers, there is no need to wait at all.

ACQ can be immediately treated just as CCA.

Waiting will actually cause the lumber to shrink, twist, split, warp and cup as the material dries.

Treating immediately keeps the liquid in the lumber intact longer and allows for a slower more controlled drying process.

This controlled drying eliminates the problems of warping, twisting, etc...

Do it immediately.
 
  #6  
Old 02-19-06, 09:54 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,064
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
Originally Posted by manhattan42
According the the lumber manufacturers, there is no need to wait at all.ACQ can be immediately treated just as CCA.



I have heard this BUT my real world experience tells me otherwise. I have never had any paint failures when waiting 2-6 months before applying any type of finish to PT. I have [but not always] had paint/stain failures on PT that was coated immediatetly.
 

Last edited by marksr; 02-19-06 at 10:21 AM. Reason: typo
  #7  
Old 02-19-06, 10:12 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,308
Received 47 Votes on 44 Posts
I have to agree with Mark. The manufacturer might say ok to seal right away, but I'm still going to wait a few months if it's my deck or dock. As to your second question, sealers have to be worked into the wood, so you still have to roll or brush after spraying. Therefore, skip the spraying and you can avoid the overspray into the water.
 
  #8  
Old 02-19-06, 04:25 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm agreeing with Mark and Mitch. Even tho the mfgr. says it's OK not to, I would wait 4 to 8 weeks, depending on how wet or dry the wood is when it's installed and how wet or dry it becomes while you are waiting. The part about "waiting will actually cause the lumber to shrink, twist, split, warp and cup as the material dries" -- NO, not if you only wait 4 to 8 weeks, and WATCH it during that period. If it warms up and the wood starts to look dry in 4 weeks, seal it. If it stays cold, wait more like 8 weeks. In either case, if it rains, add a little more time.
 
  #9  
Old 02-19-06, 05:16 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I agree with mark, mitch, and lefty
I know some manufacturers say that you don't have to wait
Sometimes that doesn't work
In the real world, we wait, it works
All the time
 
  #10  
Old 02-19-06, 05:53 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 143
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sorry to disagree but my experience and the lumber and paint manufacturer's instructions tells me differently.

Waiting before sealing only creates additional problems, including the possibility of have to clean the lumber before sealing.

Having 'wet' lumber dry on site under uncontrolled conditions only further exacerbates problems with the lumber and increases the potential for the lumber to crack, split, warp, twist, discolor, etc.

Sealing immediatley helps to control the release of moisture in treated lumber and this slower release reduces the potential for damage.

Sorry to have to disagree with you guys, but the experts are not with you on this one....including me...

Having to wait before sealing is an old wives fable that is not supported by the expert research.

I've always sealed immediately and have NEVER had a single problem...and have reduce additional ones by doing so.
 
  #11  
Old 02-19-06, 06:09 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,308
Received 47 Votes on 44 Posts
It works this way sometimes - you ended up getting very different opinions and will have to sort out for yourself what to do.
 
  #12  
Old 02-19-06, 06:15 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 143
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, and sometimes the majority is just plain wrong..


Here are some really superior Deck, Dock and Spa sealing products made by Flood that are intended to be applied specifically while the wood is WET:

http://www.flood.com/Flood/Products/Exterior/Specialty/

Scroll down to the contractor specialty products on the bottom of the page.

In the future, the best way to avoid any controversy over just when to seal or stain can be alleviated by using kiln dried after treatment ACQ lumber.

It comes with a guaranteed moisture content of 15%.

No waiting.
No confusion.

Costs a bit more, but it will be straight, dry and you'll never have any issues with it drying or taking sealers or stain.
 
  #13  
Old 02-19-06, 06:19 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by manhattan42
Having to wait before sealing is an old wives fable that is not supported by the expert research.
I understand the manufacturers say different, and you are more then welcome to post your view here, that's the point of this place
tiki8w8 can take whatever advice he would like with this

But you do know we are the ones actually finishing this stuff right?
We are experts, and not old wives
Our research is doing it, not studying it
It's my company's rep, my rep, my warranty, my time, my money, on the line
To quote lefty "Even tho the mfgr. says it's OK not to, I would wait 4 to 8 weeks"

I would also wait 4 to 8 weeks regardless of what the marketing department said
 
  #14  
Old 02-19-06, 06:39 PM
Pendragon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 1,844
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
FWIW, I wait because I don't like the way new PT lumber looks, it looks too 'new'. I like to let the wood get some natural coloring on it, then seal it with a good water sealer. Haven't experienced a problem with cracking or warping.
 
  #15  
Old 02-19-06, 07:15 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
manhattan42, slickshift, Mitch, Mark, --

First off, we're NOT going to start WWIII over this thing!!

slickshift hit the nail on the head -- we know what has worked for us and what, at least on occasion, hasn't. I know the mfgrs. say to seal it right away. I've done that. Sometimes the results were fine, and other times they weren't. And I have waited a few weeks to seal it and have never had a problem doing so. MY experience has been to look at the lumber and THEN decide. How long it sat in the lumber yard has a LOT to do with it. If it came off of the truck from the DC a month ago and sat in the racks in the lumber yard, it was curing. Then seal it as soon as you put it down. But I have gotten into boards that seemed to come directly from the PT plant -- they are still WET!! I let those sit a while before sealing them. How long they need to sit depends A LOT on the weather.
 
  #16  
Old 02-19-06, 08:08 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,308
Received 47 Votes on 44 Posts
Lefty:

I thought we had a pretty diplomatic discussion going for a while here, but things have changed. Maybe time to close the thread?
 
  #17  
Old 02-19-06, 10:03 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 143
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Time to close the thread just because 1 person disagreed with the majority?

I don't think so.

The majority at least have begun to reconsider the facts and admit their positions were 'flexible' because they know their positions are not entirely defensible.

Yet, some still don't get that just because they 'apply' sealers for a living does not make them any more research 'experts' than does picking up garbage in a restaurant for a living make one an expert in gourmet cooking!

Doesn't matter to me what you all do 'cuz I'm going on vacation this week..

But the fact remains there is little truth and little research evidence to support the claim that treated lumber must 'wait to dry' before sealing when all the evidence is to the contrary...

Fight nice.

See you next week.
 
  #18  
Old 02-20-06, 03:42 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Everyone is allowed to post their opinions
Everyone is not allowed to be argumentative and insulting
Check the rules
 
  #19  
Old 02-20-06, 05:12 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Posting your opinions, and stating what has worked and what hasn't is fine. Keep it civil, and we can get a lot of good information posted. We WON'T come up the perfect answer -- there are too many variables.

I think it comes down to what you are using for a sealer and how it reacts with what you have for wet PT.

Manhattan42 mentions a Flood product. That will probably work extremely well on brand new PT since that's what it's designed to do. I've never tried it. I have used Sikkens and SuperDeck, and they give me cosistant results if I the PT is somewhat aged. If the PT is still really wet when I apply it, sometimes the results are OK and other times they aren't. Therefore, I wait until the PT is somewhat aged.

One other thing to keep in mind -- the only place I use PT on a deck is for the framing. What I can get for PT just doesn't work well for the deck boards themselves. Takes too long to sort through the unit to find the few boards suitable to use on top, and to find the 60 or 100 that may be needed for the deck would mean sorting through SEVERAL units. Therefore, in northern CA, we don't use PT for decking -- we have redwood if somebody wants a wood deck.

I know that other areas, like the east coast, have access to some PT that IS suitable to use as decking.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: