Would this work?

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-17-06, 07:13 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 267
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Would this work?

Coming up with ideas on renovating my existing deck, this one popped into mind:

Right now its a 17'x40' deck. For ease of renovating (and to gain some yard back) Im cutting it down to 16'x32'. Thats not an issue.

However, the decking boards are currently running in the long (40', soon to be 32') direction. My thought was to reverse it, so that the decking boards run on the short direction (16'). That way I can have full 16' boards across the deck and no seams.

To do this, I planned on just adding joist hangers and 16" pieces of joist between the current joists. What I would end up with are 16" "squares" for support. Is this a good idea? I plan on using composite, so the more support the better, but I just wanted to know if using the extra 16" pieces and hanging them with joist hangers is the best/easiest way to "reverse" the deck. Wanted to avoid ripping the whole thing down, because the substructure on the current deck is in good shape, basically only the decking and railings need to be replaced.

Thanks!
-Chris
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-17-06, 01:43 PM
JCT
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a

Man, you're Thinkin Too Much Ahead...


For starters, did you do the math?
32x 16 deck= 24 joist spaces W/ 11 blocks ea (not counting ledger & header) comes to somthing like 264 blocks----If placed on 16" centers (some composites suggest 12") and 528 joist hangers. Man, I don't think I have to go much farther here.

For the same amount of effort, I'd tear down the substructure and completely rebuild it with the joists parallel to the house. You could use the outer support piers and dig new ones a foot or so out from the house for saddle beams (4). And you might find that some (if not all ) of the wood is not worth building your new deck from.

One more word here: It may be building code in your municipality that replacement of deck planks can be considered "Repair" work if the structure is left as is... Doing any kind of major redo to the structure could cost alot more than dealing with butt joints is worth...
 
  #3  
Old 03-17-06, 03:47 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 267
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yeah, I did all of the math. Then realized its just as cost effective to replace the whole thing.

But another option was mentioned...........putting one deck board perp to the house right down the middle of the deck, and then having 16' of decking on either side. So no "seams" per-say, and I get the "fancy" look of an opposite board down the middle (and down the sides if I choose).

I might be going that route. And yeah, I think way too much ahead but since I cant do it this year, I figure Ill plan everything out (even getting samples of different composites to let "weather" outside for the next year to see which one turns out better).

-Chris
 
  #4  
Old 03-18-06, 02:12 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Chris,

How long has that existing deck been there?

If it's more than about 5 years old, tear out everything but the footings and start with new framing. (It would make no sense to put a composite deck board that is going to last 20 or 30 years on framing that will be termite food in 10 years or less.)

Now you can design the framing and run the joists in the 32' direction and the decking in the 16' direction. I would go 6" farther and run a deck board along the outter edge parallel with the house and cover all of the butt ends of the decking as well. Just takes a little extra framing and 2 more deck boards at 20'. (You'll use the 20's in place of the 16's at each end so you can miter the corners, and have about 3-1/2' of waste from each. But that will be the ONLY waste you have in the entire deck, other than a little in the framing.)
 
  #5  
Old 03-18-06, 02:31 PM
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,188
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
[/QUOTE]If it's more than about 5 years old, tear out everything but the footings and start with new framing. (It would make no sense to put a composite deck board that is going to last 20 or 30 years on framing that will be termite food in 10 years or less.)[QUOTE]

Huh? I have a 24 year old deck. I have replaced the decking twice during that period. Each time I have replaced the decking or restained it I have inspected the piers, footers, ledger and joists (all PT lumber). None of them show any rot, wear, or termite damage. What's with the 5 year framing concern. Are decks built with untreated lumber in your area?
 
  #6  
Old 03-18-06, 03:00 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wayne,

Most decks around here are built with PT lumber for the framing (ALL of mine are), but it depends on where you are at, the weather conditions that the deck is exposed to, and what you can get for PT lumber.

Redding CA is probably the harshest area in the country on decks. Our PT is doug fir -- strong, but not anything that is going to withstand extremes in wet or hot very well. Redding is wet -- we get about as much rain in a year as Seattle WA -- 50". And in July and August, we are right up there with Phoenix AZ and Death Valley as far as heat -- going weeks on end above 110 to 115 degrees everyday is not unusual.

And what you get for PT today and what we got 25 years ago are totally different animals too. CCA doesn't exist any more. It's now ACQ.
 
  #7  
Old 03-18-06, 07:01 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 267
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Im going to guess its more than 5 years old because we moved in about 5 years ago and the deck was already clearly worn.

However, Ive looked underneath it and the PT substructure looks to be in quite good shape. In fact the boards still have that greenish PT tint. Obviously not exposed to much weather and plenty of air flow around them so they wont crack, etc. So the question comes down to the best way to layout the new deck boards.

Im leaning towards pulling down the substructure, and then putting 2 joists perp. to the house at 16', then joists parallel to the house out from center, 16' long. That gives me the structure I need to have the boards perp to the house (and hence 16' boards with no seams), and I can do this without buying any extra wood for the frame (the existing joists are 16' 2x8s, so I can use them in the opposite direction.....Ill also flip them over so that the nail holes from the existing decking are on the bottom and the new decking screws can bite into fresh wood).

As far as an outer board, I was going to put one final PT joist around the outer edge of the deck flush with the deck boards, and then screw/glue composite fascia to the PT board. Finished look without having to buy end caps for each deck board.

-Chris
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: