10 x 10 deck frame?

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  #1  
Old 06-01-06, 08:14 AM
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10 x 10 deck frame?

im building a 10x10x 2 foot off the ground freestanding (not attached to anything)deck..what size framming lumber would yous suggest...i have a bunch of pt 2x6s at no cost to me,brand new also....i was thinking of using them...i would have my 4 corner post,then 4 more post 5 feet dead center around the perimeter ,then put 2 or 3 more post in the center of the deck itself...do you think the 2x6 would be good enough or should i go for 2x8s...thanks for any input...george
 
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  #2  
Old 06-01-06, 08:37 AM
deckgrasshopper
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10x10 deck

George -

You should really use 2x8's or 2x10's. For a 10x10 deck (small) - you really only need 4 posts, but you can do more if you're a glutton for punishment. If you cantilver the deck 2 feet on all four sides then you only have 6 foot spans between your posts. I'd go with 2x10's for this design.

If you want to put the posts at the corners - then - yes - you need 9 posts (3 rows of 3 evenly spaced giving 5 foot spacings -- or by your descriptors, just one in the middle). In this way - you can run your posts up through the deck and attach the railing directly to them. (however - if only 2 feet off the ground - you probably don't need railing by code) This is unquestionably a stronger design, but also much more hard work.

By the way- you might consider going to 12x12 - its 44% more space and no extra cost as you have to by 12x's anyway for the 10foot length. Here you barely get by with 4 posts (cantilever) using 2x10's as 8 foot spans are OK for 2x10's. Otherwise, the 9 posts will do just fine.

You should really build the 12x12. Less work actually - no cutting! No extra cost? No brainer if you have the room.....
 
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Old 06-01-06, 08:50 AM
deckgrasshopper
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PVC railing

George -

I remember that you asked about the PVC railing as well. Same thing here - the 12x12 will cost the same as the 10x10 on the railing and will actually be less work.

As a note- you probably don't need the railing by code with a 2-foot height and this railing for 12x12 will run you a minimum of $1000 (assuming three sides coverage)

Also - with that low a deck - you have to think about the height of your posts, plus beam, plus joists all staying under 2 feet. That's not easy with 2x10's. (figure 19 inches for the beam/joist leaving only 5 inches for the post of which 2 inches is post base)

My final recommendation based on your comments: (not that you asked)

12x12 deck (same cost, less work)
2x10 beam and joists
4 posts with beam and joists cantilevered 2 feet respectively
Raise just above 2 feet to allow for a bit more post (even 2' 4" will be enough)

Skip railing if code doesn't require- spend $1000 on nice built-in benches, grill and landscaping around the edges.

And oh yeah - use composite for the top - forget PT. (now that's more money)
 
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Old 06-01-06, 10:15 AM
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thanks guys for the replies...i want to go 12x12 but that would bring me right to my propert line,well 1 and 1/2 feet away..our code here is 3 feet from property line...this is going to be a deck on the backside of my koi pond..the deck will be level with the top of pond...pond is about 2 feet above ground..im not sure if my local building department would give me a problem being this is not attached to the house and isnt high off the ground,but here in nyc i dont even want to call and ask...lol..i probably will go 12x12 cause if they are going to bother me it will be for the deck itself ,and the cost of permits and inspection ,around here we just tear it down and wait 6 months and do it again...it like 5000.00 just in paper work to have a legal deck,but thats attached to a house...
anyways setting the post back a few feet (cativelting ) is a great idea i just have to plan it out and measure ,i also have 2 large settlement tank filters in the ground i will be covering with the deck,i just have to see how they interfer with the post....
thanks again guys for the advice and help i appreciate it...
 
  #5  
Old 06-01-06, 10:39 AM
deckgrasshopper
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Then go 10x12

Well - a 12x12 is a little extra cost - 4 extra boards, but a 10x12 is truyl no extra cost. That way you can keep off the property line at the back of your property, and still not have to cut all your top boards and joists. You can mix the 2x10 beams with 2x8 joists if you keep the spans right and that way arrive at the height you want.

Good luck
 
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Old 06-01-06, 11:51 AM
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Well Lovmy4x4

I build my deck framing with 2x6 p/t and it's 14x14 and never had any problem, but under the deck i'ved put 3 long beams made with 2 2x6 nailed together the first 2 beams are at 1 feet from the sides and the other one is dead center..
 
  #7  
Old 06-01-06, 01:02 PM
deckgrasshopper
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Joist span table

Dave25L is right - with 2x6's as joists - you can span 9' 9" with 16" OC which (if you cantilver) gives you the ability to use that free wood. And you won't need a 3rd beam (keeping your work light) Agree on the doubling up for the beams always a good idea. I still like the 2x8's - but your deck will be plenty strong with the 2x6's. (don't do more than the standard 16" OC with the joists though)

If it comes down to digging for a third beam vs. using 2x8's however - I'd use 2x8's every time. Digging holes stinks.

Dave can do it on his 14x14 because his 2x6's are only spanning 5 feet.
 

Last edited by deckgrasshopper; 06-01-06 at 01:29 PM.
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