1 more ? on post to beam

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Old 06-25-06, 09:10 AM
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1 more ? on post to beam

I have 6x6 posts and want to use2 2x10's for beam. What is the best way to connect the beam to the posts? notch out post for beam and lag bolt them or is there a connector to rest beam on top of posts?
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Old 06-25-06, 08:02 PM
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what is the size of your deck? 6x6 just sounds like overkill..... but yes there are special fasteners for all ways of mounting the beam on the post.....from my research just setting the beam on top of the post is the strongest way, you can just toe-nail the beam to the posts
 
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Old 06-26-06, 06:46 PM
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You don't say how high off the ground your deck is. I feel that 6x6 posts for a deck is a little macho, but maybe you're that kind of a guy. I would use 4x4 posts and set the double 2x10 on top. The tops of the posts must be perfectly level. Set the double 2x10 girder on top of the posts and scab a 2' piece of pressure treated 2x4 on each side of each post nailing through the 2x4 scab into the post and the girder. Use lots of nails, 10d or greater. The girder will be 1/2" narrower than the 4x4 so a 1/2" shim will be needed on one side. Or you could use 6x6 posts with a triple 2x10 girder with a 1" shim.
 
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Old 06-27-06, 07:52 AM
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Just FYI, my building inspector required that the beams not merely sit on top of the posts, but also that the connection resist any lateral moment. In other words, the post is rigidly maintained perpedicularly to the beam by some type of reinforcement. Toe-nailing the beam on top of the posts would not comply with the local codes for me. (My deck is only 2' off the ground, btw) What Craig suggested would have been acceptable if it is bolted all the way through (not nailed), but a metal connector was strongly suggested instead like a Strongtie CC or PC. I ended up using a PC66 for a triple built-up girder on top of 6x6 posts. It was spendy but it made my inspector happy.

Of course your mileage may vary, but just a FYI in case your building inspector is a little more strict about these things.
 
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Old 06-27-06, 10:15 AM
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An easy method

An easy way to create the beam is to put one 2X10 on each side of the post and use bolts to hold the hold it all together.

Use two bolts spaced equidistant on the 2X10 for each post.

This eliminates any worry about lateral movement in the beam if it were sitting on top of the posts. Once you establish the level line on the posts for the top of the 2X10 the 2X10s can be held in place with a few nails while you drill the throughholes for the bolts. Any excess post can be cut off with a handsaw after the beam is in place.

I just completed a 20X14 foot deck and it is 7 ft off the ground. I used 1/2" bolts with washers on the bolt head side as well as the nut side. The beam is more than sufficient to carry my two foot cantaliever as well as the remainder of the deck weight.

I do not agree that 4X4 posts are sufficient for a deck. I feel they make great fence posts but I want something solid underfoot, especially if I'm seven feet off of the ground with a cold beer in my hand while I'm enjoying my deck.
 
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Old 06-27-06, 05:17 PM
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If the deck is only 2' above grade, there was NO REASON to use 6X6's for the posts.

Matching the posts to the beams and the beams to the girders, and keeping everything in proportion sure makes life easier.

Up to 6', I use 4X4 posts and 4X beams. A Simpson BC4 ties that together nicely. I usually use 4X6 for the beams, with a 5' spacing between the posts. (Sure, I could space them at 6', but planning them for 5' leaves me wiggle room for the unforseen!) I plan the beams to be 5' O.C. with 2X6 joists at 16" O.C. Sure, I could spread the beams a little farther apart, but it comes back to the unforseen thing.

My customers are paying for a Cadillac deck, and that's what they get. Besides, I never know how big of a hot tub they will eventually put on the deck. Doesn't matter -- my decks will support it!!
 
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Old 06-28-06, 06:43 AM
jcs
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If the deck is only 2' above grade, there was NO REASON to use 6X6's for the posts.
Actually there was. My built-up beams were tripled up 2x lumber, so geometrically speaking, it made the most sense. Also, since the posts tended to be fairly short on this deck and thus prone to splitting, I felt more secure about using larger posts. Finally, they look better than 4x4s, at least to me.
 
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Old 07-10-06, 01:05 PM
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I just finished building my deck, this is what I did; triple 2x10s sitting on top of 6x6 posts with 2 30" long peices of 2x6 on the posts to prevent the girder from moving. Code in my area requires the half inch thick galvanized carriage bolts through the 2 2x6s and the 6x6 and the same through the girder. Hope this makes sense.
 
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