Deck with stairs - too much for newbie?


  #1  
Old 11-08-08, 03:04 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: San Diego
Posts: 687
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Deck with stairs - too much for newbie?

I have a half-circle deck 13’ x 8 1/2 ‘ (off the second floor MB door) that needs to be replaced. Original deck is build without a permit and it’s 50% rotted out. Replacement deck (although nice to have in the round shape, but too much trouble for me to deal with) will most likely be in rectangular or square shape possibly 16’ x 16’. The problem is that I have no-such-friendly neighbor that I don’t want to deal with. If I extend my deck another eight feet out or even four – will interfere with his view out of the kitchen window and in our area view has a price on it. What if I try (not sure if I have enough skills) to bud a deck that has initial 4’ landing and then 3-4 stairs to bring the level up hopefully to avoid blocking the view. I have some rough sketches of the decks in a “Black & Decker” book none of the design I am thinking of and of course they don’t give the detailed plans because they want to sell them separately.
 
  #2  
Old 11-08-08, 04:03 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,982
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
If I understand you correctly, you want to build a 2 level deck. I think you can do it, but I wouldn't buy the plans from a book. I built a lot of decks as a helper with another carpenter. Then first deck I built on my own was a second story deck with strict orders to follow an architect's plan. It was different in the respect that, the plans didn't call for a ledger board and the deck stood 2 inches away from the house, so the water couldn't collect and rot the wood. You would do a lot better if you hired an architect to draw the plans.

You mentioned that the current deck wasn't built with a permit. Do you plan to file the new deck?
 
  #3  
Old 11-08-08, 07:12 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 20,233
Received 1,182 Upvotes on 1,140 Posts
If a permit is required, it should always be obtained.

Even more so if a neighbor is likely to complain.
 
  #4  
Old 11-09-08, 08:25 AM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: San Diego
Posts: 687
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Yes that is the plan - to file for a permit so the neighbor can't complain when i start building it. I would hire an architect or the contractor to build the deck if I wouldn't be on the strict budget maybe i can find a friend who knows an architect who would give me a "huge" discount and do it for free
I think if i can build a deck without touching my house it could have a good (neutral) impact on my taxes because attached structure is considered a part of the dwelling and requires additional taxes.
 
  #5  
Old 11-09-08, 05:04 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,982
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I've heard the same thing about the tax if the deck is a separate structure. The design that was used, on my job, to make the deck free standing, had the 4x4 posts go up to the top of the railing. In other words, they were part of the railing and 2 x 10s were hung between each set of 4 x 4s a little more than 3' below the top rail. When all the joists, decking and railings were completed, it gave the structure the support to stand alone. I still snuck in 2 L brackets between the house and one set of 2 x 10s.
 
  #6  
Old 11-09-08, 08:06 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: San Diego
Posts: 687
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
one more (for now) question about the deck. Is it practical to build a concrete supports for the second story deck instead of 6X6 treated wood? I know it's going to be more expensive but should last in my climate a lot longer then wood. I can deal with re-decking the top portion but supports i'd really hate to have to redo.
 
  #7  
Old 11-11-08, 11:15 AM
L
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Newbie,

Several things that you are talking about will be clarified by a trip to your local building dept.

First, a permit is required, and I wouldn't even think about doing the deck without one if the neighbor is apt to complain. You don't to open THAT can of worms.

The building dept. will tell you how close to the property line your deck can be, and you can't go any closer. They are called setbacks, and they are STRINGENTLY enforced.

Concrete pillars aren't going to fly unless they are engineered. A better solution (and MUCH CHEAPER!!) would be to add decorative columns around the wood posts to protect them. And embed Simpson standoff post or column bases in your footings and attach your posts to those.

Property tax impact -- it won't make ANY difference whether the deck is attached or freestanding. (It might in some other states, but it won't in CA!) Also, if your County Assessor is already assessing property taxes on your deck, you won't be charged any more as long as you don't increase the aquare footage. If you AREN't paying taxes on the existing deck, you'll see a VERY SMALL tax increase due to the new one. It's a deck, NOT living space, and the assessment rate is totally different. (My 12 X 20 patio cover added about $15/yr. to my tax bill when I built it.)
 
  #8  
Old 11-11-08, 07:55 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: San Diego
Posts: 687
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
hey cool,

thanks for the info!
I am building a little larder then current deck so a little increase - oh well, much better then dealing with neighbor or penalties.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: