Deck posts not aligned correctly


  #1  
Old 04-06-10, 09:47 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Deck posts not aligned correctly

Hello, it's another edition in the composite deck saga. Here's my problem now:

It looks like the help I had didn't align the deck posts correctly on one side. To be more specific:

Looking at the house from the outside, the posts on the left side of the deck (attached to the rim joist). Post closest to house and middle post are aligned. But the post furthest from the house is positioned about 3-4 inches off to the left. I'm now trying to attach the rail and the top railing board (which is in two parts that butt together at the mid post). The mid to far post has to go at an angle to line up and fit correctly at the far post (45 degree angle butt). Is there some kind of trick to solving this problem short of having to tear the far post out, dig a new hole and concrete again? I suppose I could cut an angle in the railing board at the mid to far board butt location (I would have to use and cut a bigger board than the 2x6 to make the angle work I guess). Any suggestions? Thanks guys.
 
  #2  
Old 04-06-10, 09:44 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Maryland
Posts: 439
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Attach a 2x to the side of the post, the thickness of the difference then install the rail top and bottom.
 
  #3  
Old 04-07-10, 01:56 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Do you mean a 4x?

Hi Dan,

Thanks for the response. That would work great if the distance the post fell short was to the outside. But the post needs to be further to the inside to align with the mid and back post. Doing what you suggest (I take it I would actually use a 4x to cover the 4-5" the post is off) would allow the top board to sit correctly, but then the portion of the post outside the ideal frame would still stick out. Then I have an aesthetics problem (I'm married, not an option The side rail board would also be off and couldn't go on the outside of the post.

Any other ideas? I guess the only other alternatives would be to install a second staircase in that area (so as to not require a top board), or use a wider top board (8" or 10") all the way around?
 
  #4  
Old 04-07-10, 02:17 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 9 Votes on 8 Posts
Can you post a couple of pictures of what you have. That way we can see what you see. http://forum.doityourself.com/electr...your-post.html
 
  #5  
Old 04-07-10, 03:18 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
pic of what's going on

here you go:

 
  #6  
Old 04-07-10, 07:09 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
middle post is problem

Turns out it's the middle post (it's too far inside). The house post and the far post are actually aligned. I think the idea now is to cut the middle post at the rim joist and move the upper portion over, securing it on top of the rim joist. I might cut the post above the rim joist, take a new 4x4, secure it on top of the rim joist AND nail it to the bottom post. Either way, the bottom post in concrete will still support the frame and deck floor, while the relocated joist will support the rail.
 
  #7  
Old 04-07-10, 07:28 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 9 Votes on 8 Posts
Did you pull a 3-4-5 on this deck? Is it square? Did you bury your posts? They should be sitting on a concrete footing with an exposed Post Base which are somewhat adjustable.
 
  #8  
Old 04-08-10, 09:34 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It's a rectangular deck, the posts are buried in concrete. No, I did not do a 3-4-5.
 
  #9  
Old 04-08-10, 12:45 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Southeast, Pa
Posts: 355
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The post in question does not need a footing. Cut it off at grade and install it using blocking between the joist to make it strong. Take the 2x block off the end joist before re-installing the post. The posts are not supposed to be set in concrete because they will rott (even if they are treated, cedar or redwood).

Do you have a beam or is the ribbon board nailed to the posts? It looks like that might be the case, if so you should install some lags at the least. Most inspectors require that the beam gets notched into the posts.

Bill
 
  #10  
Old 04-13-10, 06:07 AM
D
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Maryland
Posts: 439
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I see your pic (good job on that) but being so close up it's hard to figure what I'm looking at. A few different views and a little farther out would help a bit. I understand the married thing :^). The deck boards are just laying on the deck and not installed yet? Is the deck square (3 4 5 and does it matter to you if it is not)? I think what I see is the outside post, mid post and the post at the house is concealed behind the mid post? At the mid post, there is a 2x spacer between the post and joist. Looks like the joists are 2x6? The deck projects from the house about 14'? If the post that you need to realign is the mid post, I would (A) remove the outermost joist 2x6, cut the mid post and install, depending on the deck projection, a 2x10 or 12 from house post to outer post then brace and bolt the mid post to the 2x10 or (B) cut the mid post at the top of the joist, notch the upper section of the mid post to fit in the space where the filler block is You may want to notch both parts of the post, upper and lower (makes for a stronger post but more work) then bolt through the joist upper post and lower post. This puts a little dog leg in the mid post below the deck and aligns the upper post dead center between the house and outer post. If that will work, great. Let us know.
 
  #11  
Old 04-15-10, 08:30 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi guys,

What we ended up doing was cutting the problem post level with the rim joist and moving the post 2" out to correct the misalignment, then about 2" closer to the house. To support the new (upper) cut post we sent a lag screw up through a piece of scrap wood, through a piece of flooring, then into the bottom of the upper (cut) post. We secured the scrap wood to the rim joist with screws and took a second piece of scrap wood and attached that first piece of scrap wood to the original post in concrete. I also plan to place an elephant foot concrete block underneath the new assembly with a cut and vertical 4x4 and secure it snug underneath.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: