Deck posts

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Old 08-06-10, 09:46 PM
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Deck posts

All this talk about deck posts, different materials, rot etc. has anyone ever used a lally post as a permanent deck support?
 
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Old 08-07-10, 05:11 AM
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I have not installed them, but have remodeled decks that were perched on them. If a proper footing is used and they are taken care of (paint, etc.) I don't see the problem with them. They must be sized properly, so I doubt the 3" columns would be strong enough to pass the muster. Cost wise a 6" column may cost as much as two 6x6's.
 
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Old 08-07-10, 10:02 AM
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If of the adjustable kind, I doubt they can be used. Many B.D. will not allow these in a basement for a permanent fix, let alone exposed to the outdoor environment. You may need a Structural Engineer to write a paper before the Inspector accepts this substitute for the now required 6x6 post. http://www.lancova.com/deckinfo.pdf

Be safe, Gary
 
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Old 08-07-10, 02:49 PM
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Gary's right. I wouldn't think the adjustable ones would be acceptable. The ones I have seen are apparently made to order as they were solid with welded flanges.
 
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Old 08-08-10, 07:06 AM
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Gary - Are you saying that the building code now requires 6X6wooden posts? Is that something new? What about designs that call for granite, fieldstone, brick etc?

I did a little research on lally posts. They certainly have the strength to support a deck. I think the reservations were about corrosion and lateral support.

One thing I found interesting is that one of the local building codes (I for get where) required that Simpson joist hangers be used.
 
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Old 08-08-10, 01:11 PM
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Not stealing Gary's thunder, but the adjustable lally columns telescope for fit. The bottom half will fill with water since it is exposed, and either split due to freezing or prematurely rust due to standing water in the pipe.
Thus the suggestion of the solid piece pipe with flanges.
 
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Old 08-08-10, 01:27 PM
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I remember seeing decks supported by I-beams and round steel at a couple of base clubs. Of course that was with unlimited (basically) money behind it. I'm sure the 'crete they were attached to were actually pilings driven in, since they were right on beaches, rivers, and lakes.

We did build a huge picnic gazebo on an Army base I was on...and thought about using steel posts. We were able to utilize the base engineers and public works to design and build...but it turned out wood was sooo much cheaper since we had an existing concrete pebble finish slab to build on.
 
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Old 08-08-10, 04:22 PM
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I found a lot of City/Counties are using that 2006 Deck Code as their basic one.
Years ago while building decks for new houses, we set glu-lams on 24'-6x6 p.t. posts in bases on concrete piers- 3'x3' poured on pipes. The 3" pipes were pile driven 65'-75' into the ground at 30% off plumb, total of three in a tri-angle design. The top intersect was entombed in a concrete pier 12" deep, set 8' below grade. Our hillside grade was 300' above the closed/unused coal mine entrances below. Had a nice view from the decks...

Be safe, Gary
 
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Old 08-08-10, 06:05 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Not stealing Gary's thunder, but the adjustable lally columns telescope for fit. The bottom half will fill with water since it is exposed, and either split due to freezing or prematurely rust due to standing water in the pipe.
Thus the suggestion of the solid piece pipe with flanges.
Yeah, I was talking about the fixed length posts filled with concrete and cut to fit. Don't misunderstand, I am not, nor am I planning on building a deck anytime in the forseeable future. I was mostly curious about the code requirement that decks be supported by 6X6 wooden posts. Why not a lally column, granite post, fieldstone, concrete pillar etc.

I was also curious about deck codes specifying material and size for posts since there is a huge variety of materials that can adequately and safely support a deck. I'm still scratching my head about the Simpson company. Apparently, they have a lot of pull somewhere if local codes are calling out Simpson products as a requirement.

GBR - I have looked at a half dozen local codes on lineand none of them specified a size requirement for wooden support posts. Are you saying that a set of plans calling for 4X4 posts would not be per code.
 
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Old 08-08-10, 07:29 PM
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Where we are, it totally depends on the height of the deck. Go over 4' off the ground, be prepared to use 6x6's. Of course most of our decks are 16 to 20 feet off the ground on one dimension and grade level on the house side. Mountains are unforgiving.
 
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Old 08-09-10, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Where we are, it totally depends on the height of the deck. Go over 4' off the ground, be prepared to use 6x6's. Of course most of our decks are 16 to 20 feet off the ground on one dimension and grade level on the house side. Mountains are unforgiving.
There is a house on a local golf course with a huge deck. It is supported by poured concrete pillars that are faced with stone. The house is 5-6 years old. Would that design not meet current code?

I'm not trying to be argumentative, just confused. I may be misreading this statement but this is what confused me.

"You may need a Structural Engineer to write a paper before the Inspector accepts this substitute for the now required 6x6 post. "
 
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Old 08-09-10, 04:22 PM
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Obviously if your new deck plans are approved by your local B.D., whatever size posts are specified will be fine. Many B.D.'s are using the Proscriptive Deck Guide I sited, rather than write up their own deck guide. I believe it is the IRC guide for decks (have not seen the newest one). To use an alternative post would require satisfying the local Inspector--- Engineering reports, written information of loads, shear values, psi of bearing, etc. Depends on LOCAL B.D. if they use it or not.

Even with concrete "posts", all the info is listed, rebar, type, set, connections, etc.
Take stock in Simpson-- now! lol You still may be able to show an IInspector the load and shear rating of a notched joist bearing on a 2x2 ledger with "X" amount of toe-nails, but if they use the Guide, lost battle..... The result will be stronger, safer decks, which is a good thing.

Be safe, Gary
 
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Old 08-09-10, 05:55 PM
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Wayne, sure it would pass local building code! Anything that cost that much would pass I think we were too caught up in common deck materials. BUT, as Gary was saying, even the concrete post will have to be built in stages so the inspector can see the rebar cage, strength of the concrete ordered, etc.
 
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Old 08-14-10, 08:27 PM
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Building codes are different county to county!!!
Our county requires ALL new decks, no matter what size or height, to have 6x6 posts set on concrete footers in 24" wide holes.
This because too many people, after the fact, want to add roofs, screen or window-in their deck. All future problems now solved!!

fred
 
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