insect-resistant woods??

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Old 08-23-10, 01:00 PM
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insect-resistant woods??

I'm going to go with wood for my deck redo. I'm ok with the decking, it's the posts and wood trim that I'm concerned about.

The 4x4 posts are clad with +/- 5/8" painted wood. That wood is the stuff that the bugs (ants probably)are going for.

The wood gets all decayed under the paint and in some cases the 4x4s have then been eaten into and are all wobbly. I think a couple of the posts are being supported by the railing rather than the other way around.

I won't know the extent of the damage until I get in there and start taking it apart-which I don't want to do until I'm ready to replace.

the structure and posts are PT. The joists and some of the posts are in fine shape, it's just a few that are not.

So while I was considering possibly switching to South American Hardwoods for the posts, I realized the 4x4s aren't necessarily the problem.

So I will replace the posts with PT, but the wood to clad them must be rot and insect resistant.
what species would you recommend? (It will be painted)
 
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Old 08-23-10, 01:18 PM
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We use cedar around here, not sure how prevalent that is in your area
 
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Old 08-23-10, 03:29 PM
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Cedar and redwood are rot and bug resistant but do require a good coat of oil base primer before being painted any light color. Tannin bleed is prevalent with those types of wood. Cyprus is also rot resistant but I've never painted any, not stained a whole lot of it either About the only other choice would be PT.

Do you know what type of wood the posts were clad with? The clad itself might be the problem if moisture is getting behind it
 
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Old 08-24-10, 02:39 PM
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I don't know what kind of wood the sheathing is. I assumed it was pt. I'm home now and went out and checked it and it's 1x stock (3/4")

I'm sure I could do cedar. Here in new england I haven't found a whole lot of redwood. I know I can get it but it's expensive.

with cedar and PT, don't you have to let them both age about 6 months before painting?

your comment about the clad being the problem may be on the money. The rails and ballusters are fine, and the two posts next to the house (under the overhang) actually look ok.

I'll see if I can post pictures.
 
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Old 08-24-10, 02:52 PM
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If the cedar has been kiln dried - you can prime/paint it right away. If it's air dried you may have to wait awhile. You can also get kiln dried PT but it is considerably more expensive and the big box stores don't always carry it.

Not much redwood for sale around here either and it's expensive when you find it I hear that on the other side of the country it's affordable but that doesn't do us any good

What color are you needing to paint the cedar?
 
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Old 08-24-10, 03:29 PM
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I'm sure I can get the kiln-dried from my local lumber yard. I'm thinking of priming every surface before I do anything!
The color I'll be painting it will be some shade of off-white similar to existing


here's one that needs replacing...
[IMG][/IMG]
 
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Old 08-25-10, 05:32 AM
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That looks like moisture damage. An oil primer with caulking where it's needed and a couple of good coats of latex paint should have prevented the damage although you can't skip the maintainence as needed.

Use a bleach/water solution [no stronger than 50/50] to clean off the mildew, rinse well and let dry thoroughly before priming any of the raw wood. Priming the backside of the cedar would be a good idea. Caulking all the joints should also help keep the moisture from getting behind the wood.
 
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