Porch Floor Paint is WAY EXPENSIVE! Need Advice.

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Old 09-30-10, 12:40 PM
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Porch Floor Paint is WAY EXPENSIVE! Need Advice.

So I just rebuilt/refinished my 100 year old farmers porch. That included stripping and powerwashing 3 thick layers of paint and then sanding the surface smooth with a floor sander. I was able to get it down to 80% bare wood. The remaining paint has proven itself tough enough to be painted over.

Being very proud of how it came out, I wanted the best paint I can get...which is usually Benjamin Moore or Sherwin Williams in my mind. So I go to the BM store near my house (its closer than the SW) to check out thier porch paint. Holy $$$ Batman!

They wanted $120 for a gallon!!! Based on thier coverage rate I'd need a gallon + 1 quart minimum. Thier paint is also not self-priming so I'd need maybe two gallons of that. $200 to paint my farmers porch!!!

Okay, maybe they're nuts so I go to the Sherwin Williams store. Although less expensive, still mucho dinero! Their paint is self priming but I'd still need two gallons. They are still expensive at $65 a gallon. What gives?

Have I taken in too many fumes or is this normal? At this point I'm considering going to Lowes and getting Valspar's Oil-Based Porch and floor paint. At $23 a gallon, for two gallons plus primer it would be less than half of SW and almost a 1/4 of the BM price. Any advice?!?
 
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Old 09-30-10, 01:17 PM
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SWP is always running specials for diyers so you might want to keep an eye out for them. I used to get a pretty good discount but since I've retired, not so much Prices on a lot of things seemed to have increased a lot since I retired

What kind of weather is your porch subjected to? The more sun and rain it gets, the harder it will be for a coating to hold up. Generally the more expensive coatings will last and cover better than their cheaper counterpart. IF the cheaper paint only lasts half as long - you've not saved any money. Valspar had some good oil base exterior paints back in the '70s but I have no idea how their coatings stack up today.
 
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Old 09-30-10, 02:12 PM
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Thanks for the reply. First let me say that I was breathing in too many fumes. I was in disbelief of the Benjamin Moore price at my local Aubachon and went to a National Lumber the next town over. $41 a gallon. That sounds more like it. At Aubachon the Porch and floor paint was next to a garage epoxy kit...I have a feeling they swapped the stickers by mistake.

Second.....the Benjamin Moore site says to prime bare/new wood first before applying the Porch/Floor paint. The can at the hardware store said no such thing. So I went ahead and asked an employee, whom I know has worked there for at least 3 years at this pretty-much-family-owned business. He confidently said nope, no primer needed...its self priming. Weird....hopefully he is right. Here is a link to the BM datasheet if anyone cares.
http://www.benjaminmoore.com/bmpsweb...eet_file_en_US

To answer your questions marksr, the porch wraps around the front and side of the house and is covered. With gutters, the roof line extends about 1.5 ft beyond the edge of the porch. The only rain it sees is wind driven rain or mist. The front never sees the sun, the side does for about 6 hours a day...but only from Sept to April.
 
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Old 10-01-10, 02:38 AM
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I thought the BM price sounded awful high.
Generally it's best to use a separate primer but often it's ok to use the P&D enamel as a primer. When you use the P&D enamel as a primer it's recommended that you thin it about 10%, the 2nd coat would go on full strength.
 
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Old 10-01-10, 04:19 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
I thought the BM price sounded awful high.
Generally it's best to use a separate primer but often it's ok to use the P&D enamel as a primer. When you use the P&D enamel as a primer it's recommended that you thin it about 10%, the 2nd coat would go on full strength.
Funny thing is..the Benjamin Moore Porch and Floor Urethane Alkyd Enamel datasheet says do not thin.

So far we've got 3 different opinions . A professional who knows paints way better than I ever will, a clerk who sells the product and seems to know his stuff, and the Benjamin Moore website.

As an engineer, I can guarantee I am overthinking this....but thats what I do.
 
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Old 10-01-10, 09:45 AM
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Remember the BM site says to use a separate primer. The finish coat should go on full strength. If the P&D enamel was being used as the primer - that coat would be thinned in order for the paint to suck into the wood and create a good bond.

If it were me, I'd probably use an oil base exterior wood primer and then top coat with the P&D enamel I felt comfortable paying for. I don't mind paying extra for a coating if I know it will out preform the cheaper one. I'm real familiar with SWP's coatings, have used BM but not a lot and have little experience with the coatings sold at big box paint depts.

On a small job where it would save money - I wouldn't have any qualms with thinning some of the P&D enamel for the 1st coat [instead of a dedicated primer]
 
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Old 10-04-10, 10:07 AM
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UPDATE!

This thread has been something of a roller coaster ride but I figured I'd give everyone an update. I decided that I was going to make the journey two towns over to a HUGE Sherwin Williams store.

Thier price was cheap @ $43 a gallon. The associate assured me that I wouldn't need to prime, and that two coats would be plenty. He even offered to include an anti-slip additive for free. Okay, I was sold. I'll be buying all my paints from this store from now on. You get what you pay for.

It was by far the best painting experience I've ever had! (bear in mind I don't do this too often). The coverage was excellent. It is low-VOC and didn't have any odors at all. The first coat got sucked into the bare wood pretty quick and I thought I wasn't going to have enough paint but everything turned out great!

Even though the temp was cool @55-60 degrees it dried very quickly. I highly recommend Sherwin Williams Porch and Floor paint. I'll be using it again on my basement floor.

Thanks!
 
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Old 10-04-10, 12:57 PM
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Glad it worked out for you

I'd be a little leery of using the same paint on your basement floor. Does it currently have paint on it? Basement floors are prone to paint failure because often moisture migrates thru the concrete from below. If this happens and the concrete is sealed by paint - the paint will peel If there are no moisture issues - the paint should do ok.
 
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Old 10-04-10, 02:06 PM
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The basement floor is going to be interesting. It is currently unpainted. I'll be installing a sump pump even though I don't have water issues just to relieve any potential negative pressure. I'll be sealing the floor with a silicate based sealer which is supposedly paint friendly. I figure that should do it.....if not, nothing will.
 
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