Help on to slope a detached Circular Patio on a Fairly level yard?

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-23-12, 10:50 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Help on to slope a detached Circular Patio on a Fairly level yard?

I am in the planning stages of a 18 ft. diameter circular paver patio that I am going to put in my backyard. The patio is not attached to any structure (ie it's out in the middle of my yard) and I am having a little difficulty deciding how to properly slope it.

Per everything I have read it states a minimum slope of 1/4" per foot, which would be about 4.5" over the entire patio length. This part is simple enough.

The problem is that my yard is pretty flat. I had originally planned on having the pavers level with the ground, but in order to have the proper slope it would seem that the pavers on one side of the patio would be 4.5" above the ground.

I am looking for advice on how to handle this dilemma.
 
Attached Images  
  #2  
Old 05-23-12, 11:12 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,623
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
Welcome to the forums.

How far away from the house will this be?
 
  #3  
Old 05-23-12, 12:36 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It is about 60 feet away from the house.
 
  #4  
Old 05-23-12, 01:38 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,623
Received 98 Votes on 86 Posts
I think I'd try to slope it a little out from the center just so water doesn't accumulate in the middle.
 
  #5  
Old 05-23-12, 03:03 PM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,130
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Slope everything from desired center of the patio to set the center point realizing that the patio stone surface will have to slope to accommodate the desired slope that will be much less than the previous number, which was based on the diameter of the patio and not the radius (1/2 as much).

Lay out the circumference of the outside dimension of the finished patio and set your edge restraints just outside of that line and then set the tops of the restraint to the required edge elevation.

Using the center point and the edge restraint as guides, scrape off any excess compacted base to give you a 1" uniform sand (concrete sand) setting bed and allow for the thickness of the pavers you selected. and recompact.

Set the pavers in the pattern you chose, lightly cover with sand (masonry sand) and vibrate with a plate compactor. Then sweep clean.

The choice of the pattern and pavers is critical since you want a curved shape using rectangular pavers, there will be extra work. If you are dealing with a real paver supplier, there are patterns and units for circular shapes complete with drawings for installations and even pavers designed for circular installations. There are also pavers shaped for curved applications and many are antiqued/tumbled.

Dick
 
  #6  
Old 05-23-12, 08:17 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you for the good information. I had thought about sloping from the center like a cone, I was just a little worried on how the pavers would meet up with one another. But I have to agree with you and based on what you have said that is the method that I will use.

I am purchasing 2 circle kits and combining them. However I will still have to extend it 6 courses with square pavers to get to full size. I was aware that I may have to do some cutting to make the gaps tight. I was planning on playing it by ear and seeing how the pavers looked without cutting first.

I tend to be a perfectionist and will probably end up cutting them, the only problem is that I estimate that there will be approximatly 400 pavers that would require cutting. I guess I will be busy.

Thanks again for your advice and I will post pictures when I get it done.

Brian
 
  #7  
Old 05-24-12, 04:22 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,194
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I've never done any paver flatwork, but it seems to me like you're making more work than necessary for yourself. Why can't you just vary the gaps between rectangular blocks to accommodate the offsets caused by the circular pattern? The pavers will be infilled with sand between each of them (as opposed to butted up tight), right?

I've built a few brick fireplace arches using rectangular bricks on elliptical forms, and was able to make the bricks conform to the arches without cutting any of them. The variation in mortar (wedge) thicknesses was barely noticeable.
 
  #8  
Old 05-24-12, 07:49 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you for the insight. I am hoping not to have to make any cuts to the pavers, but I won't know for sure until I lay them and see what they look like. I will hope for the best but expect the worst.
 
  #9  
Old 05-24-12, 09:34 PM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,130
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If the pavers you select are the antiqued, tumbled types (more costly), minor differences are not as noticeable and installation and cutting is minimized and you will have a cobblestone appearance instead of a harsh, clean rectangular appearance.

Trying to put square pavers, especially a style that is made for clean accurate joints will always cause problems on a curved patterns and more sawing, but that is your choice.

You will never know how they will work until you have vibrated the surface/joint sand into the joists.

Dick
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: