Roof over Deck Ideas?

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Old 07-01-12, 06:02 PM
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Roof over Deck Ideas?

I really want to put a roof over a portion of my deck, and am looking for ideas. I recently got an estimate from a local contractor to extend the rear roof out to make the back a straight line, but the quote of $7,500 seamed pretty high for what would end up being a very small covered area (that quote included electrical work, permits, etc). I built the deck myself, but am not comfortable with tying anything directly into the house on my own.



If I don't extend the roof I won't be able to get away with much slope, which means a shingle roof is probably out of the question. I've been looking into pergola style roofs, but have no idea what I would use for the roofing material, or what slope would be acceptable. I want it to look nice and fit int with the "natural" feel of my back yard.

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I've seen some deck roofs that are actually taller than the house roof. Doesn't that cause water drainage issues?

Also, There is a concrete slab under the portion of the deck in the concave portion of the house. I'm assuming I'm going to have to pull up some decking to make room for posts for the roof.

Thanks for any help and ideas!

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Old 07-01-12, 06:27 PM
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With your roof line it would be quite difficult to tie in a roof. How about a popup canopy? Or a nicer permanent canopy like you see in the home stores?
Another option would be a sail canopy. Or if you just looking for some permanent shade, how about a pergola?
 
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Old 07-01-12, 07:07 PM
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I live in Central Florida, where it rains almost every afternoon in the summer. I want something that will keep water out and allow me to BBQ, sit out there, etc.. I also would like some electrical, mainly a fan under the roof. None of those things would allow that.
 
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Old 07-01-12, 10:43 PM
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Your situation is very similar to one that our egg guy has at his house. He built a pergola-style, heavy timber-framed roof assembly which looks quite decent (he milled all of the framing members from trees on their property, giving everything the "rough-hewn" look). Main carrier beams are something like 6 x 8s, parallel to the long direction of the house, with 2 x 8 joists perpendicular. And he sloped the joists by installing his taller columns (they're all 6 x 6s) next to the house, then shorter ones (I'm guessing about 15" shorter) at the outside edge of the deck. His support structure doesn't actually touch the roof, but rather is raised about 2" above the shingles, with taper-cuts on the cantilevered joists at the house end. He used heavy plastic roofing panels, with a slight tint, a bit pricey he said, but having a fairly decent warranty against cracking, crazing or breaking--I think he mentioned it was 10 years. They grill out there all the time, and have friends over even when it's raining. He said the entire structure is reasonably water-tight, with only very windy conditions allowing some blow-by to sneak in between the house roof and the deck's roofing panels. The rain gutters catch most of the rain coming off the roof, and send it to downspouts on either end. The entire structure is quite nice-looking, and doesn't look at all out of place.

His biggest complaint was keeping the gutters clean, as his yard has a few larger trees that drop a lot of leaves in the Fall, and the clearance under the joists (and proximity of the high-side carrier beam) makes for slightly limited access--I suggested he consider using a high-pressure hose nozzle to flush out the leaves, and he agreed to give that a try come Fall.
 
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Old 07-01-12, 11:12 PM
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I really want to put a roof over a portion of my deck, and am looking for ideas... I've been looking into pergola style roofs, but have no idea what I would use for the roofing material, or what slope would be acceptable. I want it to look nice and fit int with the "natural" feel of my back yard.
For a roof over the concave portion, I'd consider building a free-standing structure, supported on its own, that carries a roof that tucks up under the eaves and slopes down maybe 2" overall toward the larger deck. For the roof, I'd think about using corrugated fiberglass.
 
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Old 07-01-12, 11:40 PM
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"Tucking up under the eaves" will only work if very short people will be using the deck. Knocking one's head on the bottoms of support joists isn't fun, especially at the downhill end of them.

I'll say it again--Ouch hurts.
 
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Old 07-02-12, 07:10 AM
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I'd get more bids - one does not tell you much, you need three or more so you can compare costs and ideas.
 
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Old 07-02-12, 02:21 PM
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"Tucking up under the eaves" will only work if very short people will be using the deck. Knocking one's head on the bottoms of support joists isn't fun, especially at the downhill end of them.
The first picture in the OP shows two doors opening onto this space, with what appears to be at least 2' between the top of the door and the bottom of the eaves.

No live load and no snow load. Being generous on the dimensions, let's say, at the edge of the structure nearest the larger portion of the deck:
  • 2X10, doubled, support beam,
  • 2X8 rafters/joists,
  • 2" of corrugated fiberglass with its corrugated support pieces,
  • 2" of slope, and
  • 2" clearance at the high end.
That's 23" total. Anyone whose head will touch that will also have to duck to get through the doorways, it seems to me.
 
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Old 07-02-12, 08:49 PM
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Thanx for pointing out the fact that the OP has high ceilings in his house; I missed that. But I still don't think your suggestion is very practical, for several reasons:

1. With just a 2" clearance, how will he attach/install the roofing panels under the soffits? Even the attachment fasteners won't fit, and finding skilled carpenters who can work "blind" in a 2" space will be challenging. Same goes for when it comes time to replace broken or damaged panels.

2. Having just 2" of fall in his entire run isn't very conducive for keeping the panels flushed clear of dirt and leaves from the yard. I had a translucent -decked roof over the patio at a former house we lived (it came with the property), with a measured pitch of 1/4" per foot. The thing collected dirt like there was no tomorrow, and it really became tiresome going up on a ladder to sweep and hose the thing down every 2 weeks or so. And the twice-a-month routine was required to keep the moss and algae from growing.

3. In aesthetic terms, which would look better? A squashed down structure, squeezed under the soffits, or one with rough-hewn timbers that soars above the patio, reaching for the sky? I know which I would prefer, having seen one of the latter that I mentioned earlier. To each his own, I guess.
 
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Old 07-02-12, 10:28 PM
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1. With just a 2" clearance, how will he attach/install the roofing panels under the soffits? Even the attachment fasteners won't fit, and finding skilled carpenters who can work "blind" in a 2" space will be challenging. Same goes for when it comes time to replace broken or damaged panels.
I wasn't suggesting a structure attached to either the house wall or the eaves or soffit, or any other part of the house. In fact, I specifically described it as
a free-standing structure, supported on its own...
And if all of the fasteners are installed outboard of the eaves - with the exception of the ends of each run - repair and replacement should be manageable.

The entire roof could be made removable by attaching the corrugated supports with straps, and only attaching the covering on the peaks of the corrugation, with fasteners that stopped within the corrugated support.

2. Having just 2" of fall in his entire run isn't very conducive for keeping the panels flushed clear of dirt and leaves from the yard. I had a translucent -decked roof over the patio at a former house we lived (it came with the property), with a measured pitch of 1/4" per foot. The thing collected dirt like there was no tomorrow, and it really became tiresome going up on a ladder to sweep and hose the thing down every 2 weeks or so. And the twice-a-month routine was required to keep the moss and algae from growing.
I'm guessing that might be one of the differences between Central Florida and Oregon. That said, the slope could be increased up to 4" by raising the end under the eaves and lowering the end on the support beam by 1" each, if that would help, without impeding movement.

3. In aesthetic terms, which would look better? A squashed down structure, squeezed under the soffits, or one with rough-hewn timbers that soars above the patio, reaching for the sky? I know which I would prefer, having seen one of the latter that I mentioned earlier.
That sounds very attractive. I'm wondering though, about that structure's vulnerability to wind damage (a major concern in Central Florida), and, as you mentioned, the opportunity for rain to blow in between the new covering and the house roof. Especially with any appreciable slope to the new covering, running over a roof with no slope in the same direction.
 
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Old 07-04-12, 12:03 AM
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Regarding wind damage, you're saying a heavy timber frame structure is going to be more vulnerable than trying to attach corrugated roof decking with "removable straps?" Better have ear plugs available for all deck users, going that route, as the corrugated panels will be rattling all the time. The timber frame I'd use would be there long after the entire house blows away in a major wind event. Not sure what you're smoking, nash, but I suspect it's not legal.

And no one else, besides you (including the OP or myself), mentioned attaching any part of the roof structure to the house. So you're definitely winning the current argument on that matter that you're having with yourself.
 
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