house deck ledger board removal


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Old 08-31-12, 06:24 PM
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house deck ledger board removal

Hello Guys,
We just bought a new house and our deck ledger board is rotting, the deck itself is in ok shape with some TLC. My question is. Is it possible to remove the ledger board from the house and still keep the rest of the deck in tact? I was thinking I would be able to brace the side of the deck that is bolted to the ledger board than unbolt and drop the old rotted ledger board and replace it with a new one (with new flashing) than bolt everything back together. I wanted to get some advice before we dove into this project.
Thank you
Wulfgar62
 
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Old 09-01-12, 12:38 AM
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No reason it couldn't be done. Make sure the temporary bracing is adequate to support the joist loads, but far enough away from the ledger to not get in the way. The real tricky part is getting flashing properly installed--it might require removing a row or two of deck planks in order to get the vertical flashing leg tucked up under the siding. Also, it's not a bad idea to transversely kerf the bottoms of the first row of deck planks before reinstalling them (along with applying some copper napthanate to the cuts) to promote drainage over the flashing. Otherwise, they'll likely rot before too long because of water being trapped.
 
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Old 09-04-12, 02:47 PM
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It's probably rotted because water collected there & it will happen again. With proper supports & brackets, you can eliminate the ledger board completely.
 
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Old 09-11-12, 10:20 PM
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When you say "new house", does that mean new-construction or "old home" you just bought?

If it is new construction, I would obviously ask the builder to replace it.

If it is an old home, did you get a home inspector prior to purchase? Did he note this in his report? If not, ask him why not as this is something he should have caught.

Some questions for you:

1. What makes you think your ledger board is rotting?
2. Do you have a basement access to the side where this ledger board is attached
3. If the ledger board is indeed rotting, you may have rot issues to your rim joist and/or sill plates. Have you check those with an awl?
4. How tall is your deck?

I am fairly handy, but I don't think replacing a ledger board would be that simple. Some steps I can think of are:

1. You would first need to remove your decking (maybe some post(s) and/or guard rails)

2. Install a temporary support for the entire width of the ledger board with a beam underneath joists

3. Remove some siding and check the condition of the plywood (replace if necessary)

4. Check the rim joist and sill plates for rots

5. Reinstall plywood sheating, house wrap, water proofing membrane, new ledger board, flash & ounter-flashings, etc.
 
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Old 09-15-12, 07:34 PM
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We had this with our house as well. Ended up removing the boards and flipped them over when we put it back together. Having a clear area is key.

Not sure what the saying is, something like if there is smoke there is fire. We had a rotten board, removed it and then realized none of the flashing was installed correctly. This meant removing a lot more material than we had intended, including jacking up the house because the water had rotted through the boards and into the beams.

It maybe won't be bad for you like this, but I'd be suspect of other areas of the house if it is rotting so early. Best to check around and get on the offense with that rot!
 
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Old 09-15-12, 07:59 PM
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Well-spoken, Andrew. The OP hasn't responded for more than a month, so who knows what's going on with him? It's unfortunate when people keep putting off making necessary structural repairs, for fear of what they may find. The longer they wait, the more extensive the damage (and often much higher cost to repair).

Hope he gets to it before his deck collapses.
 
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Old 09-16-12, 04:02 AM
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Don't know if I would have "flipped" a rotten or bad board just to make it pretty. I would have replaced it in it's entirety.
 
 

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