Installing Deck on Old House without Band Board

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-18-13, 06:30 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Installing Deck on Old House without Band Board

I'm designing a deck for a client that has an old, 2-story house. The exterior wall is double wythe brick and there is no band board - the floor joists are toothed into the wythe brick.

My question is, how would I go about securing a ledger board to the outside of the house? I'm thinking the only proper way to install a deck would be to sister the deck joists to the house joists, but that would require ceiling demo inside the house.

Any thoughts?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-18-13, 06:39 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,290
Received 44 Votes on 41 Posts
Welcome to the forums.

I wouldn't worry about it, I would build the deck free standing instead.
 
  #3  
Old 01-18-13, 06:42 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The problem with that is that there is old, elaborate trim which would have to be replaced to conceal posts supporting the end at the house -- which I'd like to avoid.
 
  #4  
Old 01-18-13, 06:45 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Free standing is the only way to safely do this. Maybe you can post a few pix so we can see what you see. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
  #5  
Old 01-18-13, 06:52 AM
Halton's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 337
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
.


Penetrating the exterior brick wall with the joists would likely present a difficult area to keep properly sealed. One option would be to mount brackets on the inside joists that provide an anchor for the
thru-bolts that would fasten the ledger to the wall. As always.....you would need to use caution and not over-tighten them to avoid pulling the brick inwards.


.
 
Attached Images  
  #6  
Old 01-18-13, 06:54 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
This is an old image of the house before it was purchased. We're replacing the existing porch due to some structural damage.
 

Last edited by Mike Schulte; 01-18-13 at 09:29 AM.
  #7  
Old 01-18-13, 08:09 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 147
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I am assuming that you are trying to preserve the existing look of the porch and the only work you are hoping to do is to reframe the second level of the porch/deck. If that is the case then I would understand why you are not using a free standing deck layout. If the double wythe of brick is solid masonry and not a veneer with a cavity wall then you should be able to simply expansion anchor into the masonry with some good expansion anchors and get the support you need.

You could expansion anchor a wood ledger below the deck and set your new framing on top of that (but visually this might not fit the look).

You could expansion anchor a wood ledger board in line with the deck joist and use joist hangers.

you could expansion anchor a steel angle and set the deck joist on the horizontal leg of the angle.

No matter what you use the deck needs to be designed to avoid water getting behind the wall support (wood ledger or steel angle) and if there is a veneer cavity behind the outside wythe of brick then all of the above is not an option.
 
  #8  
Old 01-18-13, 08:41 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'm actually replacing all the columns with new fiberglass columns and new cement fiber trim, re-framing, updating the electrical, and installing a waterproof membrane and deck.

Unfortunately, it's not solid masonry. It's a veneer. The homeowner had pictures of the inside of the house during a ceiling replacement so we know for fact there is no band board. The floor joists in the house are resting on the old brick walls.

I'm thinking the only way to do it properly is to make the porch free-standing and conceal the posts with new half-columns. It's just those new fiberglass columns are pretty pricey!!
 
  #9  
Old 01-18-13, 09:22 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
"Before it was built" has me a little puzzled.
If the columns are structural, then I would use LVL across for joisting and have the band just adjacent to the veneer. Triple LVL will handle this load, IMO. Veneer will not support a deck, as you know. I love this design, and envy you for the opportunity to do a remake on it.
 
  #10  
Old 01-18-13, 09:37 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Whoops..."Before it was built" should read " before it was purchased"!

Thanks, it's a neat project, but has it's difficulties. I do believe the half-columns against the building are load bearing, but they too are facing the wear and tear of nearly 90 years of weathering/poor roof drainage.

 
  #11  
Old 01-19-13, 02:36 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 3,196
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Leave the brick alone. When you replace the existing columns, incorporate a column design that will carry all applied loads from both the porch and upper deck cross-beams; square steel tubing would be my choice, with pre-welded lugs (steel angle clips) for the beams to rest on. Even if it means adding some fancy cladding to hide the steel while making the columns look "original" (after several good coats of paint on the steel, of course, to minimize corrosion damage from condensation under the cladding). Architects do it all the time.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: