Front Door "Awning"

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Old 02-16-13, 05:43 PM
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Front Door "Awning"

I would like to build a small wooden awning to cover our front door.

I am having trouble figuring out how I should attach a ledger board to/throug the brick veneer?

As far as load goes, this small awning will be about 5 ft by 3 ft. I plan to support one corner of the awning with a 6x6 post sitting on top of the stoop. The other sides of the awning will be supported by ledger boards attached to the house.

Here are photos of the front door area.

Any suggestions?

Thanks!
 
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Old 02-16-13, 06:40 PM
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Before I make a suggestion, could you provide one more picture from farther back showing the roofline above the entryway?
 
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Old 02-16-13, 06:49 PM
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Here is a photo of the entire front of the house.

I plan to get as much slope as I can with the new roof which will be shingled to match our existing roof. I am limited with what I can do due to the window(s) above the front door.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 07:07 PM
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IMO, what would look nice there is a flat roof semi-circular portico with a few columns for support.

I worked on this one a while back.

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Old 02-16-13, 07:13 PM
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that looks great, I think I am going for a square post look...and am only planning on having one post so I don't take up a lot of room on the stoop.

How would you tie the ledger board into/through the brick? Lag screws through the brick and into the interior house framing?
 
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Old 02-16-13, 07:24 PM
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Yes, the best way is to locate the studs inside and then drill a pilot hole from the inside out through the brick.

Deck ledgers should not be fastened in this manner but since this isn't really a deck, isn't meant for people to stand on or bbq on, and isn't accessible as an exit, most building inspectors will allow it.

IMO, I would keep the roof flat with a scupper as pictured. If you wanted a rectangle, that's fine, but I wouldn't shingle it. White trim around the front with a crown moulding and dentil moulding detail might tie it in nice. Your portico addition shouldn't look out of place with the design of the rest of the house.

Keep in mind that your column or columns could (and probably SHOULD) be located outside the existing porch footing to the right of the stairs.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 10:06 PM
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I'd be tempted to eliminate the column, and instead use a cantilevered 4 x 4 framework, with a diagonal tying back into a vertical against the house wall (adjacent to the door). And I'd also slope the roof as steeply as possible, covered with shingles, to make it look like it was original construction.
 
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Old 02-17-13, 05:00 AM
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Cantilevering will require too much interior demolition to affix the cantilevered members to the existing house framing, and IMO angled supports won't add too much to the beauty of the house. No matter which way you go, the door Key will present a problem. It either needs to be shaved down, or your framing will need to avoid it, since it sits proud of the brick. I am not a fan of flat roofs, but in your case, you don't have much room for a slope, making a flat portico, possibly the best choice, and it should add elegance to the front of the house.
 
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Old 02-17-13, 07:53 AM
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Chandler-Here is a photo with what I think I will do re: the ledger boards. I will run my rafters down at a slope as much as I can. I plan to brick the bottom 1/3 of the wooden post to match the house.

What do you think of this "plan?"

Any feedback on attaching the ledger boards keeping in mind there won't be that much load involved?
 
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Old 02-17-13, 08:15 AM
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XSleeper will chime in here shortly, but IMO, a symmetrical column post set up may look better. Having only one may make it look heavy on that side. Not sure where you are in Tennessee, but you may not have much snow load, similar to where we are in North Georgia, meaning a substantially built unit with lesser slope may be good, too.

Or no column posts at all, since you can enclose it on both sides with the walls. Just another thought.
 
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Old 02-17-13, 07:42 PM
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I've already said my piece. There is no way I'd put "any type" of pitched shingled roof on that entry. IMO it would ruin the appearance of the house.

The only other option I'd suggest is maybe a canvas awning or terrace canopy of some type. A glass or acrylic one would look nice and would be clean and thin.
 
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Old 02-17-13, 08:59 PM
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So the question is--how exactly is making it look like the pitched roof's shingles going to make it look out of place? The roof and shingles are already there. This would just be an extension of them, closer to ground level.
 
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Old 02-18-13, 06:22 AM
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If that question is directed at me, I'd say that it's probably because if the roof is constructed in the space provided (where his black lines are- between the brick window sill and the top of the door) and you match the pitch of the existing roof, the porch roof would only project about 16-18" which is pretty useless for a porch roof. The black line on his picture indicates how far he is hoping the roof to project. If you start from the front of the black line and go up at the suggested roof pitch, you cover up the bottom half of the window.

If the roof starts at the bottom of the brick sill and it is made to extend lower (so that it can project a little farther), and it covers up the top transom window, it detracts from the symmetrical appearance of the sidelights and transom window above the entry door.

That and shed roofs are never attractive. The triangular side of the shed roof (that faces to the right) would have to be covered with some type of siding or wide trim that wouldn't match anything else on the house. It's a nice house- and the front entry says everything about you and your house- I'd worry about constructing something on the front of the house that looks tacky.
 
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Old 02-18-13, 09:38 AM
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"Tacky" is building any flat-roofed affair, especially like that contraption with the fake columns pictured earlier--looks like someone couldn't afford the complete, large mansion of their dreams, so they settled for a tiny door portico (with a flat roof prone to leaks, BTW) before running out of money.

No one said anything about matching the new door shelter's pitch with the existing roof pitch. Matching shingles would be more important than matching pitch, and anything greater than 2:12 would work just fine.
 
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Old 02-18-13, 08:12 PM
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Perhaps you should reread the rules about flaming other people's posts, Bridgeman. I didn't intend to offend you. My intent was not to run your idea into the ground, so if you got that impression, I apologize. However, you did ask "why it would look out of place", so I thought I was obliged to answer. I don't recall asking for your opinion about the portico I worked on, so you could just as well have left that part out... those comments benefits no one.

Since you brought it up, and if you would like to know, the flat portico with the rounded front was drawn by an architect, approved by a designer, and was exactly what the customer wanted. The picture does not show the enormous size of the house nor the existing large rounded parts of the house with built up crown moulding that the portico matches. You also obviously can't see the pitch inside the "flat" EPDM roof since it's hidden behind the short parapet wall behind the crown moulding, and contrary to your opinion, it is not prone to leak. I'm really not sure how you could make a judgment on it based on a tiny snapshot that's only 16 ft wide. But whatever, it's off topic.

What I would wish for TCarson... as I mentioned earlier... is a roof that doesn't "look out of place with the design of the rest of the house." That's all any of my previous comments meant.

Maybe he can judge for himself if a 2:12 roof on a house with no other 2:12 shed roofs would look out of place when he only has 6:12 roofs. Of maybe he can't, and needs some opinions. Isn't that what all of us are here for? To offer options- not to flame each other. I think all of us are just trying to steer him in the right direction and offer the pros and cons of various options.

Which brings me back to the reason I suggested a "flat" portico in the first place. It's thin... can be made to any size or projection... and does not interfere with the aesthetic view of the window or door/transom/sidelights. All that would be visible from a straight on view is some white trim... which could either exactly match the style of trim on the rest of the house, or accent it. A good engineer and iron worker could probably even make it so that it did not even need a support column.

I can't get a good read on how far that brick wall on the right side extends. I guess my first impression was that it was only bumped out about 16-20".
 
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Old 02-19-13, 09:21 PM
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Sorry if you were offended, XSleeper. I was not directing any specific comments towards you or anyone else; but rather, was only stating what that particular portico design looked like to ME. In an earlier post, you mentioned that "shed roofs are never attractive . . . . always look tacky"--that statement could be construed by some as a flaming comment, especially those of us who grew up in a part of the country where shed roofs were quite common (along with being practical, and acceptable). Inflammatory comments (as defined by Webster's Unabridged Dictionary) are those "tending to arouse anger, hostility or passion." Although your response shows I obviously made you angry, that was definitely not my intent. I will make an effort to more carefully choose my words in future threads you are posting on.

To that end, and not meaning any offense to your architect, I still think the portico pictured is not a good design. In my very humble opinion, I believe the 2 front columns take up too much space on the second curved tread, by restricting a smooth flow of traffic when multiple users are present. It appears close to one-third of the total tread width is occupied by out-of-proportion, fake columns. They create a somewhat "cluttered" appearance, and also would significantly block the view of anyone in the house, looking out towards the street through the open door. And again, no offense intended.
 
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