Titan Post Anchors for Pergola

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Old 03-11-13, 05:15 PM
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Titan Post Anchors for Pergola

Would the Titan post anchor system be appropriate for stabilizing this installation? And if so, can they be used under a brick patio or are they strictly for above-grade applications?

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Old 03-11-13, 05:29 PM
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From what I saw, they are cute, but what holds them to the surface? Their video only showed the base being driven into and attached to the post itself, but not to the deck. If you are planning on anchoring your pergola, you will need to pour footings to below the frost line and use Simpson Strongtie post base anchors to keep the posts from moving in any direction. Not as pretty as the Titans, but at least you can keep your pergola in your own yard and not your neighbors in a high wind.
 
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Old 03-11-13, 06:28 PM
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chandler, they recommend attaching to concrete with concrete screws...

Installing on Concrete - Titan Max 6x6 - YouTube


any reason this wouldn't work for pergola construction?
 
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Old 03-11-13, 07:04 PM
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They may work in a proper footing, but not on a paver situation, and not even in a patio situation as the weight of the pergola itself as well as the torquing of the structure will weaken the concrete and cause it to break. The video you showed was much better than the one I googled. As far as using them below grade, I would defer that to the manufacturer, since all they show is above grade applications.
 
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Old 03-11-13, 07:41 PM
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my plan would be to pull up pavers in the corners, dig, and pour concrete footings. Then install the corner posts on the footings, and put the pavers back around the posts.

the anchors would end up below the bricks as in the diagram attached, which was what i wondering in the second part of my question...

maybe someone else can chime in if they've used these before in this type of application?
 
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Old 03-11-13, 08:34 PM
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The Titan Max video shows a classic error being committed--the installer is using a hole pattern in the anchor plate that puts the anchor bolts too close to the edges of the wall (especially the back-side holes). He should have used the interior hole pattern in the plate instead. Most anchor manufacturers require a set-back distance from edge of concrete of at least 2", and many want 3". If a significant lateral load is placed on the posts being anchored, such as when high wind loading is acting perpendicular to a solid fence, the bolts will fracture and spall the concrete as they are stressed, as there's not enough "meat" to resist lateral anchor bolt forces. I've seen such spalling failures caused by improperly-located anchors many dozens of times over the years.
 
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Old 08-26-13, 09:41 AM
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Hi everyone,

I have a lot of knowledge about real world applications of the anchor and have also spent weeks and weeks in engineering labs actually observing IRC based testing procedures.

So I hope my comments are only taken as helpful additional facts to help anyone out and to ensure inaccurate statements are not taken as fact.

Pergolas

This is a very popular use for the anchor both on wood or composite decks and concrete.

Compression /Tension Testing

We have uplift engineering results showing a minimum of 6,600lbs and up to 7,100 lbs (3 sample test) required to pull a 6x6 post off the anchor. We have compression engineering results of between 23,000 and 34,000 lbs of load before observing initial deformation in the steel base. We achieved up to 50,000 lbs before the tube contacted the surface, 76,000 lbs before the lag heads contacted the surface.

Finally, as long as the post does not disintegrate we achieved maximum loads in the load cell machine of 112,000 to 118,000 lbs.

Guardrail Testing

The post anchor has been tested for residential use in guardrails following the ASTM 7032 test procedure which includes a safety factor of 2.5x above the design load. Pergola posts are much taller however so the lateral loads generated are much higher and you will get your strength from the way in which you build the entire structure.

These are great results.

Once beams and roof joists etc are all tied in together you get a very tough and rigid structure. And because a pergola is not designed to save people from falling off a deck like a railing, the performance issues are different. But as you can see, compression and tension failure is not likely to be your biggest concern.

Custom builders love it as to home owners. We get pictures of beautiful projects sent to us often.

Fence on Concrete

The video referred to use a beta version of the anchor called the Titan Max which had a stiff ribbed cavity base. We have since found that we achieve higher lateral loads with softwood posts (pine included) with our standard base because of the little bit of give and flex. Seems we get some load sharing among all the elements of the system. So we never went to market fully with the Max.

Also, those were 5" GRK caliburn screws we used and we drove them in on a 5-10 degree angle. While it is true that you want to be concerned about how close you install screws to the edge of a concrete slab, there are no worries here. With 2,000lbs + pullout strength per screw, they are the strongest element in that connection system.

You also have to keep in mind the structure being built, the purpose intended and the risks associated with it. Some structures are very critical and have different demands. That fence is looking great and the customers were thrilled to have a strong fence secured on a concrete wall without big massive bulky rusty brackets around each post.

So if anyone has any questions, don't hesitate to contact me. You will get a straight answer even if I don't have the right solution for what you have in mind. I hope this adds value to this discussion thread.

Richard Bergman
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Last edited by Shadeladie; 02-22-14 at 06:54 AM.
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Old 08-26-13, 03:07 PM
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Richard, thanks for your input on the post base system. Maybe you can answer the question posed in the original posters introduction. He was asking if they could be used below grade. Your literature does not address that. I still have a fear of spalling on the outer upper edges of the cmu wall onto which you installed the base. Although the "meat" was deeper, the initial stress will be on the weakest part of the cmu. Thanks again
 
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Old 02-21-14, 07:39 PM
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Post Anchors Below Grade

Sure Larry, sorry for the delay in replying. This is the reality of running a business and trying to stay connected to the online community - we need a 30 hour day.

The question was whether the post anchor should be used of the post or the anchor is intended to be below grade. Yet the image seemed to show a concrete pier whose top planar surface seemed to be at grade or just above grade with paver stones surrounding it from the grade level patio.

I would not recommend using the post anchor on a concrete pier where the top surface that the anchor attaches to is actually below the grade and therefore moist soil surrounds the anchor and the post bottom. This would surely lead to premature post rotting I would think.

However, if the post anchor is actually above the soil this risks is mitigated substantially. Not entirely however because I could see snow or rain traveling down between surrounding pavers stones and contacting the post and base. But if the migration is temporary and there is a path of egress then it will dry with each weather cycle much as the post does when set on composite deck or wood surfaces.

So don't bury it in the ground ever. But what the diagram seems to indicate would work so long as it is actually above the grade and good egress for run off water exists.

I hope this helps your readers.
 
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