Footings for patio cover posts

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-07-13, 04:30 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Footings for patio cover posts

I am building a patio cover over a 10 x 20 concrete patio. It will be a roof with gables on the end and a 3/12 or 4/12 pitch. I am using two beams, each being 20 feet long, at the front and back. I have post anchors in the concrete back next to the house and the beam will span 15'6" between the posts. On the other side, I need to pour some footings to put my post anchors on. I will probably space the posts the same as the front ones and I can put a middle post between the two corner posts if need be (I can't do this on the side next to the house because the sliding glass door is in the middle of the patio. I am planning on using 4 x 12 beams and 6 x 6 posts. My question is what do I need to do to pour the footings? How deep do I need to dig? How large do they need to be (how far across)? Do I need to leave some concrete above ground or can I dig my hole and fill it full of concrete and screet it off even with ground level? I live in Portland, OR so no real frost depth here. I guess I just need to know the best way to go about making these. Thanks.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-07-13, 04:49 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 21,061
Received 240 Votes on 219 Posts
Do you have a permit for this work? With footings it is a permanent structure under most codes and requires permitting. The inspections dept. should help you with the footing requirements if you are nice. They will tell you the minimum depth, size and thickness they are looking for.
 
  #3  
Old 07-07-13, 05:55 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I don't have a permit for the work and I don't know that I need one. I have looked at the requirements for my city and it says no permit is required for "◦Framed-covered accessory buildings not more than 500 square feet in area, one story in height, or closer than three feet to the property line where the structure is composed of a rigid framework to support tensioned membrane that provides a weather barrier." This is a free standing patio cover that will not be attached to the house and will have custom made canvas walls to protect from the weather. Anyway, I figured I'd just ask a simple question and see if I could get an idea. The other thing I need to do is figure out what size of 6x beams to use instead of 4x because I think the 6x beams would look better on the posts.
 
  #4  
Old 07-26-13, 01:20 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Loknload, did you ever get an answer to your question? I am beginning a project very similar to yours - I am south of you in the valley. I am building two freestanding structures just like yours. I too am struggling with footings the most. I have seen many different anchors and they do NOT look stout enough to take our winter wind storms. My parents house here in the valley has a carport that was built by a contractor and the posts are set in concrete, NOT on steel footing brackets. The carport is bigger and has been through hell and highwater over the last fifteen years, still solid as a rock so I am unsure why everyone says setting posts IN concrete is the worst thing you could do...?

Hopefully we can get a solid recommendation without the permit police barking about code, future poster's - we don't need permits for these structures in most of Oregon!
 
  #5  
Old 07-26-13, 01:34 PM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,130
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Post and beam construction requires some sort of lateral support and must have some internal brace of lateral resistance or the roof system can end up on the ground if there are winds.

the other choice is to bury the posts into the ground (as cantilever columns) to resist wind loads and help resist the wind loads from the curtains on the sides (they can end up being substatial).

It is not worth hiring a structural engineer for, so if the structure is good enough when you push or pull on the postis for a period on time, it MIGHT be acceptable in the long run. If not, just add substantial diagonals in two directions because you never know where the wind come from.

Dick
 
  #6  
Old 07-26-13, 01:43 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
@ Concretemasonry - Thanks for the tip, can you tell me why so many people are against sinking the posts in concrete? The carport I referenced earlier has been run into twice, been through a once in a century wind storm and it's fine with posts set in concrete, no signs of rot yet and we get rain here six months out of the year or more. Also, do you have a recommendation on post depth? I know its a simple structure that I'm more than capable of building sturdy - I just don't want to screw the most important part up. I ended up reading too much and now I've heard 10 different ways to "correctly" set posts...
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: