Extend Existing Patio

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Old 08-11-13, 12:05 PM
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Extend Existing Patio

I have a 12'x12' concrete patio slab on the ground at the back of the house with a wooden roof which one end is attached to the house and the other end is supported with two aluminum post from the concrete slab. This area is not heated. The concrete slab was pour when the house was built about 25 years ago and is stable with no cracks. I built the roof over it about 12 years ago.

I want to extend the concrete patio to approx. 16'x 20' (it will extend 16' from the house). Since I want to keep the existing 12'x12' slab but I donít want to pour new concrete (too expensive) for the extended part I was thinking to dig 2 or 3 holes at 16' from the house, and use "Sonotubes" which I will fill with concrete and have the new post to support the new roof.

I will demolish the existing roof and build a new 16'x20' extended roof with 2"x10" joists; one end will be supported at the house like the previous roof and the other end will rest on the 2 or 3 new post from the "Sonotubes"

For the new extended area on the ground, I will dig about 1 foot and cover with sand / gravel and 12"x12" paving stones and will be level with the existing 12'x12' concrete slab

The questions I have: would the "Sonotubes" move a lot during the winter?
The new area which I will cover with sand / gravel / paving stones, would it move a lot?

Any better ideas?
 
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Old 08-11-13, 12:31 PM
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If you go to frost level with the sonotubes, they won't heave. Pavers will heave unless you take it down to clay and build back up from there. Have you considered doing the sonotube thingy and making an additional pour around the existing patio making it 16 x 20? You're not talking a lot of concrete. You'd just have to pin it into the existing slab along the edges and form it where you want. Really not that simple, but you get the gist.
 
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Old 08-11-13, 01:48 PM
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Thank you Chandler, I will have a look at the cost of having the new area in concrete, sound like a good idea
 
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Old 01-25-14, 11:38 AM
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Spring is approaching fast and I plan to have this project done around April / May. I like the idea about pinning the new concrete area to the existing concrete but I wonder; is it a good idea to avoid the sonotubes and support the new roof at the edges of the new concrete floor?

Perhaps I can have the edge of the new concrete slab where the roof will be supported thicker?

The roof alone is not going to be that heavy but in the winter, although the roof will be slopped, there will be a lot of weight from ice / snow.

I plan to have 3 proposals to evaluate the cost / methods from each contractor and I like to be informed as to what is involved
 
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Old 01-26-14, 11:42 AM
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Supporting the new roof with columns resting on just a concrete slab isn't a good idea. The roof will go up and down as the slab heaves in winter, and then settles back down in warmer weather. Trying to maintain a water-tight interface at the junction of a moving roof with your house's roof, which isn't moving, can be a perpetual source of trouble. Life is too short to be repairing water leaks every spring.

Also, you'll need a beam resting on the 3 columns, to support the ends of the joists.
 
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Old 01-26-14, 12:02 PM
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Good idea BridgeMan, I will go with the sonotubes and yes I had in mind the beam to support the ends of joists.

Thanks for your time
 
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