Covered Patio Problems

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Old 09-24-13, 05:14 AM
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Covered Patio Problems

I will try and make this short and to the point. We had a house for and had our home rebuilt. They added a covered patio in the back for us and we were very excited. A year later the patio started to sink where the pillars were due to the weight. I dug under in 3 spots and jacked it back up and it was looking good. A year went by and we had a very hot summer here in TX and the clay ground shifted even with us watering. Now the force of the covered patio and the dry ground is pushing away the 4 inch thick cement pad ( which was never anchored to the house) and after a lot of researching looks like it should have been on a cement footer. I have a 2 inch space between the house and the patio cement. I was going to put pavers on top so that's not the issue. The pillar is being pushed out away from the house. How do I fix this? My thoughts were to add temp supports and remove the 2 pillars, then cement cut a 18 inch square where the pillar sits and dig 2-3 ft down, fill with cement and put the pillar back. This would keep the patio free of any direct pressure.
Thoughts, ideas? Attached are some pics.
 
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Old 09-24-13, 07:05 PM
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Apparently, the problem in Texas is different than most of the country. You are correct that there should have been footings under the posts. The entire patio may have needed a ribbon footing. That's where you need a local guy or someone who knows Texas.
 
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Old 09-25-13, 03:15 AM
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I agree, not knowing custom for Texas I'll only state what we have to do. The slab must be poured contiguous with a drop (ribbon) footing on all sides. This gives, not only vertical support to your post members, but it keeps the slab from slipping. If posts are known to be used after the pour, then footers for the posts are poured at the same time with rebar cages embedded in the footer.
 
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Old 09-25-13, 06:49 AM
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This really sucks and we sure don't have the cash for a new cement patio at the moment. Not worrying about the cement patio, if I cut a good 2x2 square where the post sits and dig 2-3 ft down and fill the hole with cement, would that give good support for the pillar? Is there a better way to dig a footing that wont shift? Here is a pic of the patio cover, its not very big.
 
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Old 09-25-13, 08:17 AM
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What you are suggesting is spot on. Cut the slab, dig 12-18" (to frost line) and 12" square and make a pour. This will correct the attitude of the post, but it won't do much for the slab. I feel that may be in the offing later on, so that's cool.
 
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Old 09-25-13, 09:44 AM
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Thanks for the reply, yea when money will allow to fix the deck, trying to get the wife a new car, pay off her school debt, pay off my truck. The deck is the least of my worries. Just trying to keep the roof from falling. lol
 
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