Ground Level Deck & exposed foundation concern

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Old 01-18-14, 05:43 PM
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Ground Level Deck & exposed foundation concern

I am building a ground level deck but I don't know what to do about the exposed foundation and changing the frostline. I plan on removing the dirt I have circled with black in this picture:

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If I remove 15" of dirt next to the house doesn't that mean my foundation no longer meets the requirement for the frost line? I found this pic that helps illustrate the problem and shows some type of foam:

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I'm not sure if I can leave this exposed. I thought about piling dirt back in there against the foundation but then I would have to find some type of waterproof material to use instead of a beam on the last row.

What kind of water proof building materials could be used here?

Any ideas would be appreciated, thank you!
 
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Old 01-19-14, 02:28 AM
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Since you're in Indiana, where I suspect the frost line goes down at least 48", you'd be compromising the integrity of the house's footings if you remove more than a foot of fill around the foundation walls. A preferable alternative might be to pour an at-grade concrete patio for the first 5' or 6', then build your timber deck from the end of it outward into the yard. Possibly even raising the deck a step above the concrete to give it some character. The concrete patio portion can be made more interesting by exposing the aggregate, or using dye to give it some color.
 
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Old 01-20-14, 07:17 PM
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I appreciate the response. The HOA will only let my deck extend 12' from the back of my house. I think 2 different building materials down the middle of the deck would look odd. On the side of the deck away from the house I am going to have a recessed hot tub or else I wouldn't even build a deck this small.

Are there any other ideas?
 
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Old 01-21-14, 04:58 AM
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You could still pour a concrete patio. You'd need to erect a masonry wall [with footer] along the perimeter, back fill as needed and then pour the concrete or you could pour the perimeter wall along with the slab. While a concrete patio costs more than the wood deck it requires little to no maintenance.
 
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Old 01-25-14, 03:52 AM
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It sounds like a concrete patio would work for sure. The only problem is I wanted to do it now and it is too cold for concrete. Any idea on how to make the deck work?
 
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Old 01-25-14, 04:40 AM
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I don't know much about it but there are additives that can be put in the concrete for colder weather pours.
 
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Old 01-25-14, 06:08 AM
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this article showed up in BUILDER magazine yesterday - www.builderonline.com/buildsmart - should easily resolve your issue - good luck !
 
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Old 01-26-14, 01:17 AM
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stadry- the link is dead lol. I was curious enough where I thought I would jsut search the articles by date since you told me what day it was added.... but that website does not have an advanced search feature.

Could you link me again or tell me the name of the article?

Thanks again!
 
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Old 01-26-14, 05:23 AM
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That page loads if you give it enough time but I couldn't figure out which article he was referencing
 
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Old 01-26-14, 01:40 PM
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was just a cantilever wood deck - can't find it, either, & the page's shredded already,,, as i recall it had supporting columns set back about 4' from deck edge & dble 2x8's 16" o/c from the ledger board to deck edge,,, from what i saw, kate smith could've danced out there
 
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Old 01-26-14, 07:30 PM
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Even though she might have been using the 4' deck cantilever as a trampoline.

Best practice says keep cantilevers at no greater than L/4 to avoid large live load deflection and other problems associated with excess negative bending moments. I prefer about a 2' (maximum) cantilever myself, after inspecting/observing several decks over the years with bad cases of "the wiggles" attributed to large cantilevers.
 
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Old 01-27-14, 04:17 AM
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would've been my honor & privilege to have her bounce on our deck whenever she wished as i recall sketch, it was about 4' from nearest support beam & deck was 16' from ledger board,,, that your L/4 ?

necessary modification by onsite common sense is always the unknown in any equation, no ? believe any ' wiggles ' are more often due to poor design
 
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Old 01-27-14, 07:46 PM
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If the referenced deck (that "shredded itself") was 16' from ledger to exterior edge, and had a 4' cantilever, the L/4 maximum recommended DCA 6 cantilever would have been (16' - 4' = 12') / 4 = 3' max. Meaning Kate Smith's trampoline would have exceeded the recommended maximum by 4 / 3 - 1 = 33%. Applying that amount linearly to the negative bending moment occurring in the joists' top fibers at the interior support (already the location of maximum bending moment/highest stress in the span), it could easily over-stress the joists if they were selected on the basis of performing at close to optimum.

According to DCA 6, the span length L is the net distance between supports, not the overall deck dimension including cantilevers.
 
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Old 01-28-14, 05:15 AM
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thanks - good to know, bdge doubtful i'd ever have to build 1 like that but, if ever the topic comes up, @ least we know who's got the right stuff,,, thanks AGAIN !
 
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