Gap Between Post and Beam


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Old 04-21-14, 04:30 PM
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Gap Between Post and Beam

My first time building a deck and I have the frame all laid out and beam connected to notched 6x6 posts with carriage bolts in each. My beam is perfectly level, however the beam is not sitting on the middle post. I have a 1/8 to 1/4" gap between the post and beam. The beam is 2 2x8's tied together. Is it acceptable to place shims in between so that the beam is resting on the posts and not on the carriage bolts? Or should I try to cut a new post so that the beam sets on it. My other posts are cut perfect so I really don't want to have to redo it.
 
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Old 04-21-14, 04:34 PM
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I have attached a photo of the post in question
 
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Old 04-21-14, 07:21 PM
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Beams can't sit on posts without proper support. Did you say you notched your post to accommodate this? Read up on it in this publication: http://www.awc.org/Publications/DCA/DCA6/DCA6-09.pdf
 
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Old 04-21-14, 07:31 PM
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You can see it's notched Larry. The pic is sort of at a 45 degree angle towards the un-notched portion.

I would think a couple of strips of cedar or PT lattice under the beam would work wouldn't it?
 
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Old 04-21-14, 08:00 PM
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Yeah, but he's already eaten up 3" of a 5 1/2" post, making it a breakaway point (highly unlikely, but addressed).
 
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Old 04-22-14, 02:39 AM
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More stability would result from adding a vertical "scab" 2 x 6 on the flat (un-notched) side of the column, changing out the existing carriage bolts for longer ones and using through-bolts through the column proper. If shimming is done, better results would be achieved using something stronger than cedar but impervious to rot and moisture, like recycled plastic flats. A place in Albuquerque used to make the stuff in all different sizes, and it wasn't very expensive--I must have used more than 500 lbs. of it on a large bridge rehab job we did in the early 1990s.
 
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Old 04-22-14, 07:33 AM
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Thanks for the input! I plan to work on it after work tonight. Will the building inspectors have any issues with shimming the post under the beam?
 
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Old 04-22-14, 02:02 PM
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Probably not, but depending on how fickle he is, he may make you install a second carriage bolt through the beam and post above the one pictured, as well as requiring a 3/4" washer under the carriage bolt heads throughout, including ledger bolts.
 
 

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