Ripped out 10x12 deck..now what?


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Old 04-28-14, 11:50 AM
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Ripped out 10x12 deck..now what?

So I noticed some deck boards that were not looking so well. Wanted to just replace those and as I started looking around, saw more and more to replace until finally the whole deck was down. Not sure that it was built so well so wanted to rebuild. Had some questions.

1. There is a ledger board bolted into house on top of vinyl siding. I had thought that there should be some flashing in between. Should this ledger be removed, the siding removed and flashing put in between house and ledger?

2. The deck was built without hangers with the joists resting on a small 2x2 piece of wood! That sure didnt look right. For the opposite side from the house, there are three concrete footings about 1 inch below grade. I am confused as to the best way to put posts on this. I dont like their original build where the 4x4 posts just rested on the footings and were held up vertically by two 2x10's with the 4x4 post notched for one. I would rather put some sort of connector into the concrete and connect the post to it. So my first question is what is the best way for the posts to be installed.

3. The way this was build was with three posts on the end and 2x10's all around. There way nothing underneath the 10' span to support it. Ive seen a couple different ways to set this up with one having the posts be sandwiched between them to support the joists or have the posts come up tall, 2x10's across them and hangers holding them up. Which is best way to do this?

Thanks Kevin
 
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Old 04-28-14, 01:26 PM
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http://www.awc.org/Publications/DCA/DCA6/DCA6-09.pdf

This guide should assist you in answering your questions. It includes the latest span tables. Don't confuse yourself with what was there, it probably would not be up to today's building codes. You also need to check with your local building department as most decks require permits to ensure that they are indeed built to code.
 
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Old 04-28-14, 02:56 PM
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Zoning varies a lot in tenn. The last deck I built [about 15 yrs ago] required a permit but all they wanted was the money and to come out and inspect the location - no final inspection required

It's best to call your local zoning/inspection office and see what they require. Even if you find a permit isn't needed, you still want to build it right. The link above will get you started and while I mostly stain decks, there are carpenters here that have probably built as many as I've stained ... so all you have to do is ask.
 
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Old 04-29-14, 10:57 PM
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I've only built a few decks (and actually, just helped in building them), but I've inspected several hundred over the years. So here goes:

1. Pull the ledger, remove the vinyl siding under it, and install galvanized Z-flashing tucked up under the remaining siding, out and down over the ledger. Bolt the ledger to the foundation as per DCA 6. If I was doing it, I'd add impervious spacers between the ledger and the house at each fastener bolt, which will enable the ledger to dry from both sides instead of just one. It will get wet, even with flashing.

2. Get rid of the 2 x 2 ledger holding the joists, and either support them directly on the carrier beams or use flush beams with joist hangers. I prefer the former, since I'm tight and don't like spending a small fortune on joist hangers. Elevate your columns off the concrete footings using Simpson Strong-Tie galvanized steel brackets, anchored into the existing concrete.

3. I think a 2 x 10 spanning 10' is pushing the limit, especially if you like to hold large parties where the booze and beer are freely-flowing. Installing an intermediate column would firm things up, and minimize deck wobble under load. As mentioned above, I prefer cantilevering joists over an exterior carrier beam instead of carrying everything on a rim board with joist hangers. There is no "best way."

Don't skimp on your safety railing installation. I've lost count of the number of deficient railing systems I've seen over the years, usually because the posts are improperly fastened to the framing underneath. The details shown in DCA 6 are good ones to follow if you want a sturdy railing system.
 
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Old 05-01-14, 09:14 AM
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re

Hi
Thanks for the replies. I guess I am trying to figure out the section that is opposite house. The original had three 4x4 posts notched for a double 2x10. It was notched for just one of the 2x10's and the second nailed to it. They rested on a footing that was just below grade. I am going to check this footer to see what it really is...just a block shoved in the ground or was a hole dug & filled with cement. I tend to think it is just a block. I dont like the post just resting on top of a footing!

But my bigger concern is how to do it. Many plans show three footings with a beam going perpendicular to the joists in the middle and near the end of the deck with an overhang at the end. I tend to think this would be a much better way to build than to have a ledger holding half the weight and three posts at the end with basically a double 2x10 holding it the other weight. I will go check out some neighbors homes with decks to see ones that have been done/redone.

Sure appreciate opinions.

Kevin
 
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Old 05-01-14, 07:34 PM
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Following the provisions of DCA 6 will yield much better results that looking at what the neighbors' decks look like. Too many amateurs (and even a few professionals) are out there building or replacing more than a million decks each year in the U.S. According to a recent study done by the Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory at Washington State University, improperly designed and constructed decks cause more injuries and loss of life than any other part of the home structure.
 
 

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